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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Isaac Cliford Queku, Seth Gyedu and Emmanuel Carsamer

The purpose of the paper is to investigate the causal relationships and speed of adjustment of stock prices to changes in macroeconomic information (MEI) in Ghana from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to investigate the causal relationships and speed of adjustment of stock prices to changes in macroeconomic information (MEI) in Ghana from 1996 to 2018 using monthly data. The paper seeks to conduct the investigation at individual MEI level rather than the composite MEI.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative approach was used in this paper. Monthly data span of 1996–2018 was used. The delay and half-life technique was used to determine the speed with which the information resulting from the changes in the macroeconomic are evident in the stock price. Thereafter, Toda–Yamamoto Granger no-causality approach was used to examine the causal relationship amongst variables.

Findings

The paper revealed that although the market adjustment to MEI has improved, the speed is till slow. The exchange rate exhibited the slowest speed in respect of the market reaction while the market reaction to money supply was the fastest. Toda–Yamamoto Granger no-causality estimation also revealed a bi-directional causality between MEI (gross domestic product, interest rate and money supply) and stock price and uni-directional relationship flowing from MEI (the exchange rate and foreign direct investment) to stock price. The paper also found no causality between inflation and stock price.

Research limitations/implications

The findings although revealed improved level of market efficiency in comparison with the earlier data, the speed of adjustment is still undesirable. Rigorous approach should be adopted for the implementation of major reforms such as alternative market so as to increase the number of share listing and to increase the scope of investors' participation to enhancing trading volume and marketability and ultimately speed up information diffusion.

Practical implications

The practical implication of the low level of information processing rate of Ghana Stock Exchange (averagely more than a month) is that astute investors and market analysts could employ MEI to outperform the market prior to their infusion onto the stock market.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few studies in the Ghanaian literature that has extended the investigation of the speed of adjustment beyond composite or aggregate macroeconomic level estimation to estimation at individual variable level. This contribution is very relevant since each macroeconomic variable has unique characteristics and require specific policy framework, it is important to consider the speed of adjustment from the perspective of each of the individual variables.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Andrews Osei-Bonsu, Anselm Komla Abotsi and Emmanuel Carsamer

The Ghanaian insurance industry has been transformed significantly from state-led to a market-driven one over the past decades. The empirical literature on the causal…

Abstract

Purpose

The Ghanaian insurance industry has been transformed significantly from state-led to a market-driven one over the past decades. The empirical literature on the causal relationship between insurance and economic growth has been mixed, but little study on this has been done in Ghana. This study therefore empirically examines the effect of the growing insurance industry on the economic growth in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative research design was deployed in the study. The study used Johansen–Juselius cointegration test and vector error correction model. The study deployed quarterly data from the first quarter of 2006 to the second quarter of 2018 sourced from the World Bank (World Development Indicators), National Insurance Commission, Ghana Statistical Service and Bank of Ghana.

Findings

Findings revealed that there is a significant and positive short and long-run relationship between insurance and economic growth in Ghana, bidirectional causality between insurance and economic growth and also a long-run effect of innovations (shocks) in insurance on economic growth.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of the study is the unavailability of quarterly data of some of the variables.

Practical implications

The study recommends the development and implementation of policies that promote an increase in coverage and access to insurance products to enhance economic growth.

Originality/value

The study finds a bidirectional causality running from insurance premium to economic growth and from economic growth to insurance which is consistent with the feedback hypothesis in the case of Ghana. Impulse response functions and the variance decompositions revealed that innovation (shock) in the insurance industry has a positive impact on economic growth.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Emmanuel Carsamer and Anthony Abbam

The purpose of this study is to assess the suitability of religion and religiosity in small and medium-scale enterprises’ (SMEs) tax compliance in Ghanaian markets. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the suitability of religion and religiosity in small and medium-scale enterprises’ (SMEs) tax compliance in Ghanaian markets. The current research attempts to obtain insights into the advantages of Ghanaian religious notoriety in tax compliance based on the perceptions of entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey is the main tool used in this research. A total of 472 questionnaires were distributed to SMEs without Ghana revenue authority. Because of self-administered instrument, all the questionnaires were returned for analysis.

Findings

The results suggest that Ghanaian religious notoriety does not explain SMEs’ tax compliance and that tax evasion is seen as ethical. Institutional, firm and entrepreneurs’ characteristics are important determinants of SMEs’ tax compliance.

Practical implications

The results of this research paper will help regulators and Ghana Revenue Authority in developing tax compliance education without compromising on religion.

Originality/value

This paper provides empirical evidence of the suitability of religion and religiosity in emerging markets in general and Ghana in particular and enhances the level of understanding of SMEs’ tax compliance.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Emmanuel Carsamer

The concept of co-movement has witnessed a resurgence in the international finance literature in recent years after the black swan events. This might be due to a renewed…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of co-movement has witnessed a resurgence in the international finance literature in recent years after the black swan events. This might be due to a renewed focus on globalization and financial market integration in the world over. The purpose of this paper is to examine the dynamic linkages in the foreign exchange market resulting from recent globalization and financial market integration in Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework was adapted from the extant literature and was used as the basis of modeling foreign exchange market in Africa. This paper adopts a quantitative research approach and opted for dynamic panel data analysis to empirically unearth the determinants of foreign exchange market co-movement.

Findings

It is interesting to note that exchange rate co-movements were externally determined. Robust support was found for trade intensity, competition and world interest rate on foreign exchange rates co-movement, but regional interest rate differential decreased it. These findings clearly demonstrate the level of financial development and challenges that sometimes exist in exchange rate policy implementation by policy makers in Africa.

Research limitations/implications

Future research might incorporate bilateral investment into the model of exchange rate correlation.

Originality/value

Studies focussing on simultaneous consideration of intensity, trade competition and capital account openness to exchange rate correlations in the contexts of Africa are almost non-existent, and this study makes an important contribution in not only addressing this imbalance but also more importantly improving the relatively parsimonious literature on foreign exchange co-movement.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Emmanuel Carsamer

The concept of volatility transmission and co-movement has witnessed a resurgence in the international finance literature in recent years after the black swan events which…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of volatility transmission and co-movement has witnessed a resurgence in the international finance literature in recent years after the black swan events which gave evidence of financial market linkages. The purpose of this paper is to examine the dynamic sources of volatility transmission in the foreign exchange market in recent financial market integration in Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework was adapted from the extant literature and was used as the basis of modeling exchange rate volatility transmission. This paper adopts a quantitative research approach and opts for augmented DCC model to empirically unearth the sources of exchange rate volatility transmission.

Findings

The key findings of the study are that, the African market is more prone to shock from outside than in the region. Macroeconomic news surprises influence volatility transmission and co-movements. Robust support is found for trade balance, interest rate and gross domestic product. These findings clearly demonstrate the low level of financial development and challenges that sometimes exist in exchange rate-policy implementation by policy makers.

Research limitations/implications

Interested academics and practitioners working in the area might incorporate bilateral investment into the model of exchange rate correlation in future research.

Originality/value

Unilaterally considering exchange rate volatility transmission and subsequent augmentation of the DCC model, this study makes a modest contribution to the examination of exchange rate correlations in Africa. This study makes an important contribution in not only addressing this imbalance, but more importantly improving the relative literature on exchange rate volatility transmission.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

John Kuada

Abstract

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2020

Joseph Ato Forson, Rosemary Afrakomah Opoku, Michael Owusu Appiah, Evans Kyeremeh, Ibrahim Anyass Ahmed, Ronald Addo-Quaye, Zhen Peng, Ernest Yeboah Acheampong, Bernard Bekuni Boawei Bingab, Emmanuel Bosomtwe and Akorkor Kehinde Awoonor

The significant impact of innovation in stimulating economic growth cannot be overemphasized, more importantly from policy perspective. For this reason, the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

The significant impact of innovation in stimulating economic growth cannot be overemphasized, more importantly from policy perspective. For this reason, the relationship between innovation and economic growth in developing economies such as the ones in Africa has remained topical. Yet, innovation as a concept is multi-dimensional and cannot be measured by just one single variable. With hindsight of the traditional measures of innovation in literature, we augment it with the number of scientific journals published in the region to enrich this discourse.

Design/methodology/approach

We focus on an approach that explores innovation policy qualitatively from various policy documents of selected countries in the region from three policy perspectives (i.e. institutional framework, financing and diffusion and interaction). We further investigate whether innovation as perceived differently is important for economic growth in 25 economies in sub-Saharan Africa over the period 1990–2016. Instrumental variable estimation of a threshold regression is used to capture the contributions of innovation as a multi-dimensional concept on economic growth, while dealing with endogeneity between the regressors and error term.

Findings

The results from both traditional panel regressions and IV panel threshold regressions show a positive relationship between innovation and economic growth, although the impact seems negligible. Institutional quality dampens innovation among low-regime economies, and the relation is persistent regardless of when the focus is on aggregate or decomposed institutional factors. The impact of innovation on economic growth in most regressions is robust to different dimensions of innovation. Yet, the coefficients of the innovation variables in the two regimes are quite dissimilar. While most countries in the region have offered financial support in the form of budgetary allocations to strengthen institutions, barriers to the design and implementation of innovation policies may be responsible for the sluggish contribution of innovation to the growth pattern of the region.

Originality/value

Segregating economies of Africa into two distinct regimes based on a threshold of investment in education as a share of GDP in order to understand the relationship between innovation and economic growth is quite novel. This lends credence to the fact that innovation as a multifaceted concept does not take place by chance – it is carefully planned. We have enriched the discourse of innovation and thus helped in deepening understanding on this contentious subject.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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