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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09684880010312686. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09684880010312686. When citing the article, please cite: Martin Belcher, Emma Place, Grainne Conole, (2000), “Quality assurance in subject gateways: creating high quality portals on the Internet”, Quality Assurance in Education, Vol. 8 Iss: 1, pp. 38 - 48.

Details

Library Consortium Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-2760

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Emma Martin and Katherine Gardiner

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the steps the hospitality sector is taking to ensure compliance with the age discrimination legislation introduced in October 2006.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the steps the hospitality sector is taking to ensure compliance with the age discrimination legislation introduced in October 2006.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of the five sub sectors of the hospitality industry, hotels, restaurants, pubs and clubs, contract catering and hospitality services, was conducted during April 2006.

Findings

It was found that ageism was considered a problem by respondents from hospitality services, largely public sector organisations, and the greatest impact from the legislation was considered to be within these firms. Overall, 45 per cent of respondents reported knowing “little” or “nothing” about the incoming legislation and the overwhelming majority felt they did not know enough.

Research limitations/implications

Out of the postal survey of 950 organisations there were 112 respondents, representing a response rate of just below 12 per cent. Perhaps the most prominent issue with surveys of this type are the concerns of employers about compliance and being caught out or, in this case, it may highlight a greater level of apathy or lack of awareness than the following results show.

Practical implications

The findings show the need to target the message about the age discrimination legislation particularly to the pub, club and hotel sector.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the desire for knowledge about the legislation across the sector and the lack of awareness of sources of information.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Emma Kingston

The purpose of this paper is to compare the emotional competence of first year undergraduates enrolled on a high or low drop‐out rate (HDR and LDR, respectively) course…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the emotional competence of first year undergraduates enrolled on a high or low drop‐out rate (HDR and LDR, respectively) course, at a newly established university within the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative data collection methods was used. The Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue) established participants' emotional competence, and semi‐structured interviews were used to probe the findings from the TEIQue.

Findings

The results indicate that typical HDR course participants have high self‐esteem and a good level of interpersonal skills, but are controlled by their emotions and exhibit an external locus of control. This manifests itself in a distrust of peers as a source of support and a reactive attitude to self‐improvement. Typical LDR course participants have low self‐esteem and a good level of intrapersonal skills, but have developed the ability to control their emotions and exhibit an internal locus of control. This manifests itself in a high level of confidence in peers as a source of support and a proactive attitude to self‐improvement.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the learning styles literature by investigating the impact of students' characteristic affective behaviours on their vulnerability to drop‐out.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Emma Martin

Despite the renowned poor employment practices across the hospitality industry recent analysis of the Workplace Industrial Relations Survey reported higher levels of job…

Abstract

Despite the renowned poor employment practices across the hospitality industry recent analysis of the Workplace Industrial Relations Survey reported higher levels of job satisfaction among hospitality employees than those in other industries. This paper presents a collective case study of hospitality employees across four small independent restaurants to shed light onto why this situation might exist. The paper discusses the influence an employee's orientation to work has and demonstrates how orientations underpin individual attitudes and behaviour. In presenting four different orientations to work, how individuals manage work and life for personal satisfaction and gain, is illustrated. Indeed, this individualistic ideology contributes to the levels of job satisfaction reported.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2011

Martin Farnham and Emma Hutchinson

A substantial literature examines the effect of high-performance workplace practices on various outcomes for firms and workers. However, little attention has been paid to…

Abstract

A substantial literature examines the effect of high-performance workplace practices on various outcomes for firms and workers. However, little attention has been paid to the effect of broad job design on product quality or financial performance. And with rare exception, the empirical literature on outcomes from high-performance work practices treats those practices as exogenously determined. This chapter seeks to address these two shortcomings in the existing literature. Using a nationally representative cross-section of British employers in 2004, we measure the effect of multiskilling on establishment-level labor productivity, product quality, and financial performance. We find that treating multiskilling as an endogenous choice of employers in empirical models of organizational performance has significant implications for the results. In particular, the estimated (positive) effect of multiskilling on labor productivity vanishes when we treat multiskilling as an endogenous choice of employers. Treating multiskilling as an endogenous choice changes its estimated effect on product quality from zero to positive and substantially increases the estimated magnitude of its (positive) effect on financial performance.

Details

Advances in the Economic Analysis of Participatory and Labor-Managed Firms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-760-5

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Paul A. Willie, Chandana Jayawardena and Barrie Laver

The purpose of this paper is to identify the best approaches management should embrace to successfully attract and retain high quality human resource talent within the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the best approaches management should embrace to successfully attract and retain high quality human resource talent within the Niagara region's hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A selected cross‐section of relevant and recent publications are reviewed. The key findings from a mini survey involving 14 senior hospitality managers in the Niagara region are shared.

Findings

This paper suggests that the hospitality managers should: understand the basics related to good human resource management practices; know the “fair market value” for each position; foster relationships with colleges and universities to tap into student labor; encourage mature workers to apply for part‐time work; and cultivate a good relationship with seasonal employees and educate them on the rewards of a career within the hospitality industry. Through the industry survey, it was discovered that hospitality managers within the Niagara region are already executing some of these strategies. However, it was concluded that a stronger working relationship with the seasonal employees is required in the region.

Originality/value

Two academics with hotel general manager experience in five countries join hands with the president for three four‐diamond hotels to write this paper. Given the background of the authors, it is expected that the viewpoints would be welcomed by hospitality managers.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1945

FIGHTING has indeed ceased in Europe and our gratitude, especially in London and its adjacencies, is profound. It is shared by all, of course. War is by no means over and…

Abstract

FIGHTING has indeed ceased in Europe and our gratitude, especially in London and its adjacencies, is profound. It is shared by all, of course. War is by no means over and that and the drearier contentions of politics for a month or two, or it may be for years, are likely to act as a brake on many schemes. It is true a substantial Education Act has been achieved during the war but such peace as we have achieved finds none of the great social schemes, other than this, anywhere but in the realm of talk. Older men may well be cynical and more may be sceptical; so, it becomes those who believe a better world is possible to be aware. Hardly a town or county is without a scheme of development of sorts, ranging from entirely new, and always enlarged, central libraries to extended branch schemes. The cold fact is that only in a few cases, if in any, will any building of libraries be permitted yet. That does not mean that scheming is a vain occupation. Librarians realize as other men do that housing needs will overwhelm building resources for a few years and that schools, which are disastrously inadequate to permit the full implementing of the Act of 1944, and hospitals, will be preferred to us. Librarians, however, must be opportunists, too ; they will lose nothing by readiness to seize chances. Let us take what we can get; if, in the many newly‐planned residential centres, satellite towns, or other communities, no elaborate library accommodation is possible, let us reflect that what really matters are a book service and a centre of information, which do not require elaborate buildings, only good librarianship. Then, when the needs of the area are known, an appropriate building may be provided. And, as Mr. Berwick Sayers has suggested, much more temporary buildings than have been erected in late years should be used ; we have too many “good buildings” which are obsolescent—to say the least. It can be assumed now that readers do not need so much inducement to use public libraries as they did formerly, although some do and it is well to insist that temporary buildings are not necessarily unattractive inside or outside.

Details

New Library World, vol. 47 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Richard Teare

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2011

Pauline Heslop and Anna Marriott

This paper aims to outline the process of undertaking the Confidential Inquiry (CI) into the deaths of people with learning disabilities and discusses three particular…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline the process of undertaking the Confidential Inquiry (CI) into the deaths of people with learning disabilities and discusses three particular issues: engaging with professionals; maintaining confidentiality; and the tension between wanting to base the findings on a sufficiently large number of cases so that the findings are robust and reliable, but also wanting to make immediate changes to any potentially modifiable factors found to contribute to the deaths of people with learning disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The CI into the deaths of people with learning disabilities reviews the deaths of all people with learning disabilities living in the (former) Avon and Gloucestershire areas. It has been commissioned by the Department of Health to run until March 2013. One of the key drivers for a CI has been the work of Mencap in exposing the unequal health care that some people with learning disabilities received in the NHS.

Findings

The principal goal of the CI is to improve the standard and quality of care for people with learning disabilities and ultimately their health outcomes. The CI team aims to detect potentially modifiable contributory factors in the care of a person with learning disabilities who has subsequently died, share any examples of good practice in their care and provide information to guide the commissioning of services.

Originality/value

It is anticipated that the findings of the CI will provide a considerable amount of evidence on which to improve the standard and quality of care for people with learning disabilities and ultimately their health outcomes.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2011

Beverley Dawkins

This paper aims to provide a commentary on the previous paper in this issue “The Confidential Inquiry (CI) into the deaths of people with learning disabilities – the story so far.”

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a commentary on the previous paper in this issue “The Confidential Inquiry (CI) into the deaths of people with learning disabilities – the story so far.”

Design/methodology/approach

The author considers the potential impact of the CI in reducing the health inequalities and premature deaths of people with learning disabilities.

Findings

The author considers how the process of conducting the CI described in the paper will address the fundamental issues of indifference and discrimination documented in the Mencap report, Death by Indifference.

Originality/value

The author suggests that, in conjunction with the findings that the CI will publish in the future, that the political will to change the way health services are delivered to people with learning disabilities in the future will be crucial.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

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