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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Emma Hallam and I.R. Murray

Voluntary sector information, presents particular challenges to information providers, in terms of networking across a diverse body of organisations. Opportunities offered…

Abstract

Voluntary sector information, presents particular challenges to information providers, in terms of networking across a diverse body of organisations. Opportunities offered by WWW community networks include information sharing through online databases, more efficiently updated than printed sources, and electronic networking, potentially easing communication between organisations and between sectors. This paper presents the results of both quantitative and qualitative surveys of the local voluntary sector in the Borough of Charnwood Forest, Leicestershire. The IT capabilities and information needs were measured and examined. The opinions of local practitioners in voluntary sector information were also sought. A range of different levels of IT skills and facilities was found amongst local voluntary sector organisations, and a reticence amongst some organisations to get involved in recent IT developments was also detected. Facilitation, in the form of training, IT support and facilities, was therefore identified as important to effective voluntary sector information provision. It was recommended that research should be carried out with regard to local information needs, and that an editorial board be established.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Emma Martin and Katherine Gardiner

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the steps the hospitality sector is taking to ensure compliance with the age discrimination legislation introduced in October 2006.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the steps the hospitality sector is taking to ensure compliance with the age discrimination legislation introduced in October 2006.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of the five sub sectors of the hospitality industry, hotels, restaurants, pubs and clubs, contract catering and hospitality services, was conducted during April 2006.

Findings

It was found that ageism was considered a problem by respondents from hospitality services, largely public sector organisations, and the greatest impact from the legislation was considered to be within these firms. Overall, 45 per cent of respondents reported knowing “little” or “nothing” about the incoming legislation and the overwhelming majority felt they did not know enough.

Research limitations/implications

Out of the postal survey of 950 organisations there were 112 respondents, representing a response rate of just below 12 per cent. Perhaps the most prominent issue with surveys of this type are the concerns of employers about compliance and being caught out or, in this case, it may highlight a greater level of apathy or lack of awareness than the following results show.

Practical implications

The findings show the need to target the message about the age discrimination legislation particularly to the pub, club and hotel sector.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the desire for knowledge about the legislation across the sector and the lack of awareness of sources of information.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Liz Matykiewicz and Robert McMurray

The purpose of this paper is to consider the ways in which certain occupational, organizational and political positions become active sites of leadership construction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the ways in which certain occupational, organizational and political positions become active sites of leadership construction. Taking as their example the introduction of the Modern Matron in the English National Health Service (NHS) this paper considers how new forms of gender transcending leadership are constituted relationally through a dynamic interplay of historical, nostalgic, social, political and organizational forces.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted within an interpretive paradigm of social constructivism and draws on data from semi‐structured interviews with a purposive sample of 16 Modern Matrons working in a single English NHS Trust. In keeping with inductive, qualitative research practice, data has been analysed thematically and ordered using descriptive, hierarchical and relational coding.

Findings

Their contention is that the Modern Matron presents as a site for relational leadership in respect of both self and other. This paper argues that the construction of Modern Matron usefully points to the ways in which multiple discourses, practices and relations may be intertwined in defining what it is to lead in contemporary organizations. This paper highlights the extent to which leadership is an on‐going relational co‐construction based – in this instance – in the interplay of four factors: nostalgic authority, visibility, praxis and order negotiation. Together, these produce a mode of leading that is neither heroic nor popularist.

Research limitations/implications

Further research might consider how competing temporal, political and organizational imperatives encourage the development of particular sites for leadership, and how such leadership is then re‐performed in practice, as well as the affects/effect on individual and organisational performance.

Originality/value

The data provides opportunity to consider the “lived experience” of leaders in sites that are traditionally gendered female in non‐standard/public sector settings. Moreover, this paper presents empirical evidence in support of leadership as socially constructed and relational, borne of tension between different temporal, spatial and experiential factors, the on‐going negotiation of which both utilises and transcends masculinized and feminized gender performances. The result is a form of “leading” which is often subtle, difficult to identify and self‐effacing.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Emma Martin

Despite the renowned poor employment practices across the hospitality industry recent analysis of the Workplace Industrial Relations Survey reported higher levels of job…

Abstract

Despite the renowned poor employment practices across the hospitality industry recent analysis of the Workplace Industrial Relations Survey reported higher levels of job satisfaction among hospitality employees than those in other industries. This paper presents a collective case study of hospitality employees across four small independent restaurants to shed light onto why this situation might exist. The paper discusses the influence an employee's orientation to work has and demonstrates how orientations underpin individual attitudes and behaviour. In presenting four different orientations to work, how individuals manage work and life for personal satisfaction and gain, is illustrated. Indeed, this individualistic ideology contributes to the levels of job satisfaction reported.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Emma H. Wood and Jonathan Moss

Using techniques developed mainly in subjective well-being and “happiness” studies, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the applicability of these and related methods…

Abstract

Purpose

Using techniques developed mainly in subjective well-being and “happiness” studies, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the applicability of these and related methods for understanding and evaluating the emotional responses experienced within the live music event environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The concept of “experience” is debated and set within the context of music events designed to create a specific type of emotional experience for the attendees. The main tools for researching experiences over a time period are considered focusing on the “experience sampling method” (ESM) (Csikszentmihalyi, 1997) and the “day reconstruction method” (Kahneman et al., 2004). These methods are critiqued in terms of their usefulness and practicality as research tools in the study of audience emotions.

Findings

A revised method was then developed and a small-scale trial undertaken at a live music event, the results of which are presented and discussed. A conceptual model illustrating the interconnectedness of experience is introduced as an example of the application of the data gathered through this method to theory development. The paper concludes by reflecting on both the methodological appropriateness and practicality of ESMs as a way of gathering valuable data on the emotions engendered by events.

Research limitations/implications

An obstacle yet to be overcome is using this data to predict attitudinal and behavioural change related to arts marketing goals. However, studies in other areas have clearly shown that emotional response is a significant indicator of future behaviour suggesting that the potential is there.

Practical implications

The trialled method provides a useful starting point for better understanding the complexity of emotional effects triggered at live music events.

Originality/value

The paper concludes that an adaptation of these methods has the potential to provide much needed rich and credible data on the feelings and emotional reactions triggered by different elements of a live event.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Erika Cudworth, Will Boisseau and Richard J. White

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 41 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2008

Margaret Flynn and Bridget Penhale

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Syahrul Nizam Kamaruzzaman and Emma Marinie Ahmad Zawawi

This paper aims to provide better understanding of the practices and experiences of facilities management (FM) in Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide better understanding of the practices and experiences of facilities management (FM) in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses contemporary roles, issues and future challenges facing FM in Malaysia. It also reviews other western countries where FM is better and more effectively managed. In addition, the paper generates ideas on the future plans and strategies for the development of FM in Malaysia.

Findings

The paper finds that Malaysia still lacks a maintenance and facilities culture. Many things need to be established in order to satisfy both the public and private sectors. Out‐sourcing is identified as one of the best options for FM in Malaysia, which may involve more companies, with more contracts being tendered out.

Originality/value

This literature review offers insight into FM in Malaysia. It is suggests that more technical expertise in this field should be encouraged in order to improve the status of FM in the country.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Abstract

Details

Innovation and the Arts: The Value of Humanities Studies for Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-886-5

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Book part
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Mike Finn

Abstract

Details

British Universities in the Brexit Moment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-742-5

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