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Article

Eddie Kane and Emily Evans

Interactions between individuals experiencing mental health (MH) problems and the police are complex and may affect the way in which both parties react to and experience…

Abstract

Purpose

Interactions between individuals experiencing mental health (MH) problems and the police are complex and may affect the way in which both parties react to and experience the interactions. The purpose of this paper is to examine three commonly used interventions to improve these interactions.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods were used to examine embedded MH professionals in command and control rooms, Liaison and Diversion Teams and Street Triage. The authors also reviewed the use of Section 136 (s136) of the Mental Health Act 1983 (2007) during the period these interventions were deployed.

Findings

There was strong support for these interventions but also gaps, resource and operational issues that need to be addressed if they are to have optimal effect on delivering appropriate diversion from the justice system, reduce reoffending and improve MH outcomes for individuals. The use of s136 remained relatively constant.

Originality/value

Despite a recent increase in the level of investment related to these interventions the evidence base remains limited. This study provides baseline of research evidence for those who commission and provide services for individuals experiencing mental ill health and who are in contact with the justice system.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article

Rick Brown and Emily Evans

This study examines changes to the night‐time economy of Hartlepool in the north east of England following the introduction of the Licensing Act 2003. It shows that later…

Abstract

This study examines changes to the night‐time economy of Hartlepool in the north east of England following the introduction of the Licensing Act 2003. It shows that later opening hours led to later drinking, which in turn led to later violence, criminal damage and antisocial behaviour. Over the period examined, violence against the person fell by 14% in the town centre between the hours of 8pm and 4.59am, while criminal damage fell by 15% and antisocial behaviour increased by 4%. Extending the licensing hours would appear to have contributed to a more moderate (4%) reduction in violence against the person, resulting from a reduction in violence between midnight and 1.59am (the previous closing time) and a smaller increase between 2am and 4.59am. Using the same approach, criminal damage and antisocial behaviour saw small net increases over the same period. Both licensees and partner agencies perceived that changes were detrimental to the town centre. Existing powers at the time of the research appeared to be insufficient to address these problems, which affected the whole of the night‐time economy area rather than individual premises. However, new proposals for extended early morning restriction orders would allow local authorities to revert to the opening hours in place prior to the Licensing Act 2003.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article

Emily Evans

The purpose of this paper is to outline findings from research into Integrated Offender Management (IOM), an example of multi-agency working between the police, probation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline findings from research into Integrated Offender Management (IOM), an example of multi-agency working between the police, probation and drug treatment services, and how this is expected to be affected by the “Transforming Rehabilitation” (TR) changes to the probation service being introduced by the Ministry of Justice.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach was realistic evaluation. The findings of this paper draw upon semi-structured interviews undertaken with IOM staff, offenders and a small number of national IOM portfolio holders. Observations of the operation of IOM in the local site have also been used.

Findings

Three underpinning mechanisms within IOM were uncovered during the research, all of which are at risk from the TR changes.

Research limitations/implications

IOM, as it currently operates, will be affected fundamentally by the TR changes, due to the disruption to stable multi-agency working. The research is limited by taking place during the planning and initial roll out of the TR changes; as a result interviewees were commenting on their expectations rather than their direct experience of the changes. However, their experience within IOM makes them well placed to assess the likely impact of TR.

Originality/value

As the TR changes are new, this paper is amongst only a small number seeking to assess their anticipated impact based on primary research.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Content available
Article

Paresh Wankhade

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article

Josephine May

The article sets out primarily to fill in some of the gaps in the biography of Lucy Arabella Stocks Garvin (1851–1938), first principal of Sydney Girls High School. As a…

Abstract

Purpose

The article sets out primarily to fill in some of the gaps in the biography of Lucy Arabella Stocks Garvin (1851–1938), first principal of Sydney Girls High School. As a reflexive exercise stimulated by this biographical research, the second aim is to explore the transformative work of digital sources on the researcher's research processes that in turn generate possibilities for expanded biographical studies in the history of education.

Design/methodology/approach

This article encompasses two approaches: the first uses traditional historical methods in the digital sources to provide an expanded biography of Lucy Garvin. The second is a reflexive investigation of the effects of digitisation of sources on the historian's research processes.

Findings

The advent of digital technologies has opened up more evidence on the life of Lucy Garvin which enables a fuller account both within and beyond the school gate. Digital sources have helped to address important gaps in her life story that challenge current historiographical understandings about her: for example, regarding her initial travel to Australia; her previous career as a teacher in Australia and the circumstances of her appointment as principal; her private and family life; and her involvement in extra school activities. In the process of exploring Garvin's life, the researcher reflected on the work of digital sources and argues that such sources transform the research process by speeding up and de-situating the collection and selection of evidence, while at the same time expanding and slowing the scrutiny of evidence. The ever-expanding array of digital sources, despite its patchiness, can lead to finer grained expanded biographical studies while increasing the provisionality of historical accounts.

Originality/value

The article presents new biographical information about an important early female educational leader in Australia and discusses the impact of digital sources on archival and research processes in the history of women's education.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article

Emily Mellor and Simon Duff

This research paper reports findings from a qualitative analysis which explored pornography use in secure hospitals. The purpose of this paper is to investigate what…

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper reports findings from a qualitative analysis which explored pornography use in secure hospitals. The purpose of this paper is to investigate what attitudes staff working in secure hospital have towards patients having access to pornography, how they make decisions regarding access to pornography and what factors they take into account during this process. This research is an extension of a prior quantitative research study (Mellor and Duff, 2019).

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews to explore professionals’ attitudes towards pornography use in a secure hospital. The sample comprised of six volunteers who had taken part in a previous research study (Mellor and Duff, 2019) requesting to discuss the topic area further. As such this research study was developed. Thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006) was used to analyse the qualitative data and the Attitudes towards Pornography Scale (Evans-DeCicco and Cowan, 2001) was used to collect demographic information.

Findings

Six themes were identified from the transcripts. The first theme explores staff members’ attitudes towards pornography. The second relates to the use of boundaries and monitoring of pornography. The third theme looks at the potential impact that pornography could have on the patient, either positive or negative. The fourth theme explores the extent to which patients are still considered as human beings, whereas the fifth theme explores the vulnerabilities that may make patients more at risk of being negatively influenced by pornography. The final theme looks at decision making regarding access to pornography.

Practical implications

The research offers an insight into how pornography within secure hospitals is managed. The research also provides an exploration into multi-disciplinary team decision making with regard to pornographic material and notes the general openness of staff towards patients having access to pornography.

Originality/value

The findings have important messages for services with regard to policy making. The findings are also relevant for understanding how pornography is managed with in secure hospitals.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article

Emily Staite, Lynne Howey, Clare Anderson and Paula Maddison

Data shows that there is an increasing number of young people in the UK needing access to mental health services, including crisis teams. This need has been exacerbated by…

Abstract

Purpose

Data shows that there is an increasing number of young people in the UK needing access to mental health services, including crisis teams. This need has been exacerbated by the current global pandemic. There is mixed evidence for the effectiveness of crisis teams in improving adult functioning, and none, to the authors’ knowledge, that empirically examines the functioning of young people following intervention from child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) crisis teams in the UK. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to use CAMHS Crisis Team data, from an NHS trust that supports 1.4 million people in the North East of England, to examine a young person's functioning following a crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

This service evaluation compared functioning, as measured by the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS), pre- and post-treatment for young people accessing the CAMHS Crisis Team between December 2018 and December 2019.

Findings

There were 109 participants included in the analysis. ORS scores were significantly higher at the end of treatment (t(108) = −4.2046, p < 0.001) with a small effect size (d = −0.36). Sixteen (15%) patients exhibited significant and reliable change (i.e. functioning improved). A further four (4%) patients exhibited no change (i.e. functioning did not deteriorate despite being in crisis). No patients significantly deteriorated in functioning after accessing the crisis service.

Practical implications

Despite a possibly overly conservative analysis, 15% of patients not only significantly improved functioning but were able to return to a “healthy” level of functioning after a mental health crisis following intervention from a CAMHS Crisis Team. Intervention(s) from a CAMHS Crisis Team are also stabilising as some young people’s functioning did not deteriorate following a mental health crisis. However, improvements also need to be made to increase the number of patients whose functioning did not significantly improve following intervention from a CAMHS Crisis Team.

Originality/value

This paper evaluates a young person’s functioning following a mental health crisis and intervention from a CAMHS Crisis Team in the North East of England.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Article

Ahmad Thamrini Fadzlin Syed Mohamed, Ahmad Fahimi Amir, Nur Khadirah Ab. Rahman, Emily Abd Rahman and Afifah Quraishah Abdul Nasir

The purpose of this paper is to give insight on the important preparation task needed to be considered by prospective PhD candidates prior to the start of their study. As…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give insight on the important preparation task needed to be considered by prospective PhD candidates prior to the start of their study. As pursuing and obtaining a higher degree qualification is becoming more eminent for those who want to advance their academic career, crucial preparation is needed before embarking on the doctoral quest.

Design/methodology/approach

A small-scale study of the PhD experience was carried out in a public university in Malaysia using semi-structured in-depth interviews with eight successful doctoral students representing three different faculties to assess respondents’ experiences concerning the preparation aspect, challenges faced and strategies used to overcome the problem.

Findings

From the interview data, three overarching themes emerged: motives, task and financial and health as important dominators that could influence a successful venture of a PhD journey.

Research limitations/implications

As the present research respondents were few, further research with bigger number of respondents may shed better light in identifying other important aspect in preparation for PhD. The authors are unable, in the space of this paper, to fully explore the implications of the data, and the work of others that it builds on, for the future of professional doctorates or other types of PhD awards. As professional doctorates are fully concentrated on their professional endeavour, i.e. nursing and education, the preparation needed may include different groundwork. In addition, this study was carried out in Malaysia, where the system may not necessarily share the same characteristics to other doctoral systems in other countries. Cultural differences, the impact of age, gender and race, were other variables that could be weighed by future research in the same area.

Practical implications

The university’s graduate office should line-up courses to inform future doctoral candidates on the aspect of preparation at personal level that the students need to carry out.

Social implications

The study provides new views where potential doctoral students should be helped and guided to become more consciously aware of their decision in pursuing a higher degree. This paper provides suggestions on the guidelines of the initial preparation needed before embarking on a PhD journey and managing their own learning.

Originality/value

The paper establishes the important aspect of the preparation phase needed to be considered by future doctoral students before pursuing their doctoral quest.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

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Article

Emily Mellor and Simon Duff

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the attitudes of staff members in secure hospitals and the general population towards pornography use and their decision-making…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the attitudes of staff members in secure hospitals and the general population towards pornography use and their decision-making regarding access to pornography.

Design/methodology/approach

A between participants design was used whereby 324 participants, including 162 staff members and 162 people of general population, answered an online questionnaire. Vignettes were presented of six hypothetical patients in a secure hospital, based on gender (male/female) and offence type (sexual/violent/non-offender). Participants were required to decide whether the individual depicted in the vignette should have access to pornography. Finally, participants were given a psychometric assessment of their own attitudes towards pornography.

Findings

Participants were less likely to decide that the sex offender should have access to pornography than the violent or non-offender, thus the offence type of the patient was a significant predictor. There was a significant relationship between attitudes to pornography and whether the individual in the vignette should be given access to pornography. There was no significant difference between attitudes towards pornography of the general public and staff members or for male and female participants. Gender of the patient described in the vignette was not a significant predictor.

Practical implications

The research highlights the importance of our own attitudes towards pornography, our possible beliefs about sexual offenders and the effects these may have on decision-making.

Originality/value

The research determines attitudes towards pornography and explores how attitudes influence decision-making.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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