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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Émilie Genin, Mélanie Laroche and Guénolé Marchadour

This paper examines the challenges posed for employers by gender equality in the workplace, in a seemingly favourable institutional context (the province of Quebec…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the challenges posed for employers by gender equality in the workplace, in a seemingly favourable institutional context (the province of Quebec, Canada), and the reasons why employers adopt (or not) gender equality measures (GEMs) exceeding legal requirements.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach draws on both institutional theory and the strategic human resource management (SHRM) approach. Our research is based on a quantitative study involving human resource management professionals in Quebec (n = 296).

Findings

The results allow us to link GEMs with certain SHRM orientations (Yang and Konrad, 2011) and institutional pressures (Lawrence et al., 2009). The findings show that, for approximately two-thirds of the employers in the sample, gender equality was not a strategic priority. Consistent with our hypothesis, a greater number of GEMs were found when gender equality was a strategic priority for the employer. Unionization and legal requirements were also positively correlated with the presence of GEMs.

Originality/value

The findings indicate a combined effect of SHRM and institutions on GEMs. They point out the relative dependency of employers on the pressures stemming from the institutional framework, and it captures some of the current challenges involved in adopting a SHRM approach with a view to achieving gender equality.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Luis Cisneros, Emilie Genin and Jahan Peerally

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how small family business (SFB) leader‐founders exhibit a dominant logic of action over less dominant prevailing ones. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how small family business (SFB) leader‐founders exhibit a dominant logic of action over less dominant prevailing ones. The authors investigate three logics of action: family, power and economic.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative research is conducted based on case studies. The authors use Cisneros and Genin's conceptual model, to identify, through an iterative sampling frame, three extreme SFB cases where in the first the leader exhibits a dominant family logic, in the second, a dominant power logic and in the third, a dominant economic logic.

Findings

The authors illustrate the characteristics of the SFB leaders when they exhibit a dominant logic of action and also present some of the implications of SFB leaders’ dominant logics of action on the SFB and the family and non‐family members.

Research limitations/implications

The three extreme case studies provide an important building block for future studies based on larger samples of SFBs. However, the authors’ results cannot be generalised due to the exploratory nature of the study.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the importance, for practitioners and researchers alike, of being able to diagnose when SFB leaders use a dominant logic of action. The paper also accentuates the need for a greater awareness of logics of action in training programmes for SFB leaders and for consultants who work with those leaders.

Originality/value

The concept of logics of action has never been previously empirically applied to large, medium or small family businesses. The paper highlights the relevance of identifying dominant logics of actions in SFB leaders.

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Diane‐Gabrielle Tremblay and Emilie Genin

Paid parental leave for both mothers and fathers has fed countless debates. Four years after the implementation of a new parental leave policy in Quebec, this paper aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Paid parental leave for both mothers and fathers has fed countless debates. Four years after the implementation of a new parental leave policy in Quebec, this paper aims to assess how parental leave is perceived in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from employee surveys carried out in a municipal police service, the paper employs analysis of variance techniques to compare the perception of parental leave within two groups of respondents: those who had gone on parental leave and those who had not.

Findings

The findings highlight significant differences between the perceptions of parental leave entertained by the respondents who have taken it up and those who have not yet experienced parental leave.

Social implications

Analysing these differences has produced extremely interesting findings: adopting a public policy is not sufficient; organisations need to make employees feel supported in taking parental leave if they really want the policy to achieve the targeted results.

Originality/value

Paid parental leave is relatively new in Europe and almost non‐existent in North America and few studies have been carried out to measure their perception in the workplace. This research shows how important it is to follow the use of the policy to make sure that it does not have negative impacts for those who use it.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 30 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Victor Y. Haines, Alain Marchand, Emilie Genin and Vincent Rousseau

The purpose of this paper is to address the theoretical ordering of the associations between work hours, psychological demands, decision latitude, and psychological distress.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the theoretical ordering of the associations between work hours, psychological demands, decision latitude, and psychological distress.

Design/methodology/approach

A mediation model, predicting that the association between long work hours and psychological distress is mediated by psychological demands and decision latitude, was tested with a representative sample of 7,802 individuals in full‐time paid employment surveyed by a government agency. Structural equation modeling was used and the full mediation model was replicated for subsamples of men and women. The analysis controlled for demographic variables, work characteristics and socioeconomic status.

Findings

As expected, decision latitude is associated with less and psychological demands with more psychological distress. Long work hours are associated with more decision latitude and psychological demands. The association between long work hours and psychological distress is mediated by psychological demands and decision latitude. The mediation process was supported in male and female sub‐samples.

Research limitations/implications

Considering the weak associations between work hours and psychological strain reported in previous research, the findings of this study support new theorizing about this association. Accordingly, long work hours may be viewed as a distal variable influencing the duration of exposure to psychological demands. The study reported here also underscores the need to further investigate the positive consequences of long work hours within the context of psychological contracts.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies that conceptualize work hours as something other than an occupational risk factor or as a job demand with a direct impact on psychological strain. It thus provides a new basis for thinking about the process through which long work hours may influence psychological strain.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Lorna Collins and Nicholas O’Regan

Abstract

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2009

Anne‐Sophie Godfroy‐Genin

The purpose of this paper is to present some outcomes of the PROMETEA research project funded by the European Union under FP6 from 2005 to 2007 (see www.prometea.info)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present some outcomes of the PROMETEA research project funded by the European Union under FP6 from 2005 to 2007 (see www.prometea.info). PROMETEA is a strongly multidisciplinary and collaborative project involving 17 research teams from 13 different countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines existing knowledge with new in‐depth pilot studies on women academics in engineering and technology, linked to qualitative research work on the experiences of both women and men working in this field, using cross‐comparison as a research strategy.

Findings

The paper identifies different issues for further investigations on women researchers in engineering and technology.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on comparative perspectives between countries, disciplines or research topics, age groups, academic and industrial research career paths, etc. The similarity and diversity of academic settings are discussed with an emphasis on the impact of the changing environment of research, the balance between research, teaching and administrative workload with its influence on career choices and patterns, the interactions between industry and academia, work‐life balance, the proportion of women academics in the field, gender awareness, and so on.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

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