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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2014

Michał K. Lemański

The purpose of this chapter is to conceptually analyze reverse transfers of human resource management practices from subsidiaries of transnational corporations in emerging

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to conceptually analyze reverse transfers of human resource management practices from subsidiaries of transnational corporations in emerging markets to their headquarters in developed countries.

Methodology/approach

This is a conceptual chapter based on a review of the pertinent literature. Analysis is performed at the organizational and national levels.

Findings

We identify the type of transnational corporation best positioned to learn and utilize the potential of its emerging market subsidiaries to advance its human resource management practices. We further identify the types of practices best suited for reverse transfer.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical tests of our propositions are needed. We encourage researchers to extend our research by considering the regional (supra-national), industry and individual levels of analyses.

Practical implications

Managers are informed when and where potential for learning new practices is the greatest, and are urged to scrutinize those corporate units where such potentials exist, and yet transfers do not occur.

Originality/value

Emerging markets offer substantial learning potential for transnational corporations, yet most recent studies focus on transfer of technology and product innovations from subsidiaries, leaving the transfer of human resource management practices largely unexplored. Therefore, this study advances research on organizational knowledge and innovation management, and organization of transnational corporations.

Details

Multinational Enterprises, Markets and Institutional Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-421-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2020

Zeeshan Mahmood and Shahzad Uddin

This paper aims to deepen the understanding of logics and practice variation in sustainability reporting in an emerging field.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deepen the understanding of logics and practice variation in sustainability reporting in an emerging field.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts the institutional logics perspective and its conceptualization of society as an inter-institutional system as a theoretical lens to understand reasons for the presence of and variation in sustainability reporting. The empirical findings are based on analysis of 28 semi-structured interviews with significant social actors, and extensive documentary evidence focusing on eight companies pioneering sustainability reporting in Pakistan.

Findings

This paper confirms the presence of multiple co-existing logics in sustainability practices and lack of a dominant logic. Sustainability reporting practices are underpinned by a combination of market and corporate (business logics), state (regulatory logics), professional (transparency logics) and community (responsibility logics) institutional orders. It is argued that institutional heterogeneity (variations in logics) drives the diversity of motivations for and variations in sustainability reporting practices.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers a deeper theoretical explanation of how various logics dominate sustainability reporting in a field where the institutionalization of practice is in its infancy.

Practical implications

Understanding the conditions that influence the logics of corporate decision-makers will provide new insights into what motivates firms to engage in sustainability reporting. A broader understanding of sustainability reporting in emerging fields will foster its intended use to increase transparency, accountability and sustainability performance.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to relatively scarce but growing empirical research on emerging fields. Its major contribution lies in its focus on how multiple and conflicting institutional logics are instantiated at the organizational level, leading to wide practice variations, especially in an emerging field. In doing so, it advances the institutional logics debate on practice variations within the accounting literature.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Richard Hayman and Erika E Smith

The purpose of this article is to discuss approaches to sustainable decision-making for integrating emerging educational technologies in library instruction while…

2414

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to discuss approaches to sustainable decision-making for integrating emerging educational technologies in library instruction while supporting evidence-based practice (EBP).

Design/methodology/approach

This article highlights recent trends in emerging educational technologies and EBP and details a model for supporting evidence informed decision-making. This viewpoint article draws on an analysis of recent literature, as well as experience from professional practice.

Findings

Authors discuss the need for sustainable decision-making that addresses a perceived lack of evidence surrounding emerging technologies, a dilemma that many library educators and practitioner-researchers will have faced in their own library instruction. To support the evidence-informed selection and integration of emerging educational technologies, a two-pronged model is presented, beginning with an articulation of pedagogical aims, alignment of technological affordances to these aims and support of this alignment via hard evidence available in the research literature, as well as soft evidence found in the environmental scan.

Originality/value

This article provides an outline and synthesis of key issues of relevance to library practitioners working within a challenging and ever-changing landscape of technologies available for learning and instruction. The proposed approach aims to create a sustainable model for addressing problems of evidence and will benefit academic librarians considering emerging educational technologies in their own pedagogy, as well as those who support the pedagogy of others.

Article
Publication date: 25 July 2022

Remko van Hoek, Mary Lacity and Leslie Willcocks

This paper offers a novel approach for conducting impactful research on emerging topics or practices. This method is particularly relevant in the face of emerging

Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers a novel approach for conducting impactful research on emerging topics or practices. This method is particularly relevant in the face of emerging phenomena and new dynamics, such as the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on supply chain risks. Because these new phenomena and dynamics are relatively unexplored, little prior knowledge exists in literature and industry, and they represent a large opportunity and/or challenge to practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The action principles research (APR) approach, as a newer version of critically engaged research (CER), offers comparison against more traditional empirical or intervention-based research. The authors illustrate the approach with a pandemic risk-management study.

Findings

The APR approach originated in the information technology field. It is highly applicable for researchers who are seeking to more expeditiously support decision making and actioning on new dynamics and emerging topics and practice in supply chain management than is allowed by traditional methods and longitudinal CER.

Originality/value

In the context of ongoing calls for relevance, impact and actionable findings on pandemic risk management, this paper describes an approach to developing timely findings that are actionable for practitioners and that advance science around dynamic and emerging topics or practices. We hope this will grow societal value of research, particularly in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic and the new dynamics and uncertainties that managers face in modern supply chains.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 52 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Kofi Q. Dadzie, Wesley J. Johnston and Jaqueline Pels

This study aims to examine the nature of business‐to‐business marketing practices in two West African nations, Ghana and Ivory Coast, and compare them with marketing…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the nature of business‐to‐business marketing practices in two West African nations, Ghana and Ivory Coast, and compare them with marketing practices in another emerging market economy (Argentina) and a developed economy (the USA).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected in both West African nations, Argentina and the USA, using a standard survey instrument used in previous contemporary marketing practice (CMP) studies. Descriptive statistics were used to determine cross‐national differences in intensity of use of various CMP activities in Ghana and the Ivory Coast in comparison with Argentina and the USA. Then, cross‐national differences in various combinations of marketing practices were identified using cluster analysis.

Findings

Business‐to‐business marketing practices in West African nations conform with the CMP framework in that firms practise both transactional marketing and relationship marketing simultaneously. However, there are differences in the intensity and scope of business‐to‐business marketing practices in Ghana and the Ivory Coast in comparison with Argentina and the USA. While West African business‐to‐business firms emphasize traditional transactional marketing with some network marketing components, Argentine firms have a greater emphasis on pluralistic marketing and interaction marketing. By contrast, US firms practise pluralistic marketing (transactional, database, interaction, and networking) with some transactional marketing activities. In addition, West African business‐to‐business firms are similar to Argentine firms in that a proportion of firms practise marketing at a low level of intensity and rarely use database marketing. These differences are attributable to the nature of market conditions in West Africa.

Research limitations/implications

The CMP results generalize to West African nations. However, a direct correspondence is unlikely because of the dominance of transactional marketing practice among West African firms. Further research needs to investigate a broader set of institutional environments in order to provide a clear link between CMP and environmental conditions in emerging African markets.

Practical implications

Managers can determine the appropriateness of international benchmarks for West African market conditions.

Originality/value

Linking CMP to market conditions in the paper provides an extension to the validity of the CMP framework.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2018

Shigufta Hena Uzma

This paper aims to study from three perspectives: the developed countries corporate governance (CG) practices, the role of OECD in the global convergence of CG standards…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study from three perspectives: the developed countries corporate governance (CG) practices, the role of OECD in the global convergence of CG standards and India as an emerging country.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the various CG codes and regulations enacted in the Indian paradigm with special reference to the Indian Companies Act 2013 (cited as Act 2013).

Findings

The Act 2013 endeavours to provide a governance landscape in India with reforms. The new CG codes comprehensively introduce more accountability, transparency and stringent disclosure requirements. However, these changes are affected by the ownership structure, the level of enforcement and regulatory compliance of CG disclosure practices imposed on companies.

Research limitations/implications

Further research can be carried out in three domains in emerging countries: ownership structure, the effect of legal and regulatory environment and impact of mandatory compliance.

Practical implications

Legal and regulatory environment are notable extent that can effectively govern the CG codes. An increase in the board size, investor protection and gender diversity, with strong governance structure, can enhance the transparency of companies.

Originality/value

The paper examines the prominence of CG norms with the ratification of the Indian Companies Act 2013, which is analogous with global CG policies and regulations.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Roger Brooksbank, Zahed Subhan and Richard John Calderwood

Questions surrounding the uptake patterns and applicability of conventional strategic marketing practice (CSMP) within emerging markets remain largely unanswered. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Questions surrounding the uptake patterns and applicability of conventional strategic marketing practice (CSMP) within emerging markets remain largely unanswered. The purpose of this paper is to address some of these questions in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The usage patterns of conventional, developed world, basic strategic marketing practices within manufacturing firms in India – one of the world’s fastest growing emerging markets – are compared against the usage of the same practices among their counterparts operating in the highly developed market of the USA. The study is based on separate surveys conducted in each country. Data analyses are conducted using χ2 tests.

Findings

CSMPs are being quite widely adopted in India albeit to a lesser extent than in the USA. However, several notable areas of difference suggest that some practices might not be appropriate in emerging markets due to one or more of their unique and strategically relevant situational characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

Low response rates render questionable the extent to which the study samples can be considered representative of the populations under scrutiny. Equally, differences in the respondents’ interpretation of some of the marketing terminology used in the questionnaire cannot be ruled out.

Practical implications

The research confirms that Indian marketing strategists appear to judge many conventional practices to be appropriate within an emerging market environment. However, it also casts doubt on the relevance of at least eleven specific practices.

Originality/value

The study provides a useful starting point for better understanding the adoption patterns and applicability of conventional strategic marketing within a uniquely interesting cross-cultural context that has attracted little academic attention to date.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Laura Maftei and Chris Harty

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the use of immersive virtual reality (IVR) impacts on the surprise aspects of designing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the use of immersive virtual reality (IVR) impacts on the surprise aspects of designing.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical case is a new hospital in the UK wherein a CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment) type of an IVR environment was used performing six design review sessions during the bid preparation stage. Drawing from a former video-based study, the authors conducted follow-up discussions with the participants to access their perspectives on design surprises emerging from their engagement with the IVR. The study developed a reflective methodology, interviewing participants about their experiences of doing design in the immersive environment. Retrospective discussions were conducted in a data review format, through playing back video clips of the IVR design sessions and asking the participants to reflect on their IVR design experience and on design surprises emerging from their engagement with the IVR.

Findings

The findings indicate that IVRs, such as the CAVE, are not only enhancing existing understandings of design but also challenging the participants' understanding of the design as they experience the immersive version of it, provoking ruptures in current procedures and driving unanticipated changes to the design.

Originality/value

This qualitative study of surprise in design work using IVRs (for a real-life design project) brings new insights into emerging practices of designing using immersive technology, such as the CAVE.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Alistair Anderson and Sébastien Ronteau

The purpose of this paper is to examine the explanatory power of existing theories of entrepreneurship. The authors find gaps and fragmentation and offer propose a…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the explanatory power of existing theories of entrepreneurship. The authors find gaps and fragmentation and offer propose a different approach – a theory of entrepreneuring – a theory of practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper, but the authors draw heavily on the literature. They also offer examples of what the theory can offer.

Findings

Existing theory is good at explaining aspects of entrepreneurship. However, most theories are discipline bound and operate in silos. A theory of entrepreneurship practice can connect and bridge disciplines.

Originality/value

A theory of entrepreneurship as practice will not replace current theories. It will however complement them and thus be well suited to emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2016

Mahfod Aldoseri and Andrew C. Worthington

The purpose of this chapter is to review the risks Islamic financial institutions face in an emerging market context, including risk sharing in Islamic financing and…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to review the risks Islamic financial institutions face in an emerging market context, including risk sharing in Islamic financing and Shari’ah (Islamic law) compliance risk. We explore current risk management practices and establish the link between risk management and the financial performance of banks and the efficiency and effectiveness of financial sectors in emerging markets. Because of their distinctive risk profile, Islamic finance institutions face challenges in risk management. We show that Islamic banking is riskier in emerging markets because of the presence of immature money markets, limitations in the availability of lender of last resort facilities, and deficiencies in market infrastructure. There is also no evidence that Islamic banks have developed effective solutions for managing the risks conventional banks face as well as their own unique risks. We suggest that the countries that do this best are those that prioritize the structure of risk management knowledge and capabilities in a single financial regulator.

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