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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2012

Emad M. Kamhawi

The main purpose of this study is to craft and test a framework for the link between knowledge management (KM) and performance in organizations, with a view of providing a

3734

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to craft and test a framework for the link between knowledge management (KM) and performance in organizations, with a view of providing a deeper understanding of the different KM output levels or stages that this link goes through, as well as highlighting the organizational context of each level in that link.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method was used to elicit opinions from 167 mid‐ and top‐level managers from the top 81 Bahraini businesses.

Findings

The study results produced a fishbone model. Its spine positioned knowledge management activities as the first output level, leading to innovation as the second, which in turn impacts the organization's level of agility, and finally links to performance as the head of that skeletal model.

Research limitations/implications

The results highlight the different organizational enablers for these stages, which have been diagrammed as the ribs of the fish skeleton‐like model.

Originality/value

The framework may become a standard model, i.e. may work as a reference for academics and practitioners to help evaluate which KM level needs to be emphasized, at what time, and then what critical factors managers should work on, in order to maximize the organization's outcome from each stage of the model.

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Emad M. Kamhawi

This study aims to underline the role of information technology (IT) in adopting Balanced Scorecard (BSC) systems/initiatives in Bahrain. It seeks to highlight this role…

1169

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to underline the role of information technology (IT) in adopting Balanced Scorecard (BSC) systems/initiatives in Bahrain. It seeks to highlight this role through comparing the IT‐related factors/requirements against the non‐IT‐related ones that contribute to the implementation of such systems. Moreover, it provides a better understanding for the adoption of such systems through investigating the availability of such factors in Bahraini organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi method was utilised relying on a panel of 67 BSC experts from 34 Bahraini organisations.

Findings

The results indicated that IT requirements for adopting BSC initiatives had the same level of importance compared to non‐IT requirements. From the non‐IT‐related requirements, management factors such as “clear strategic management” and “top management support”, and implementation factors such as “preparing implementation plans” and “proper training and guidelines” came on the top of the requirements list. On the other hand, the study suggests software interface characteristics such as “graphical user interface” and “easy to use application”, and data quality factors such as “standard data formats” and “data accuracy” as the top IT‐related requirements.

Originality/value

This study extends current research efforts related to the adoption of BSC systems. It provides insights for understanding how organisations get ready to implement such initiatives in both IT and non‐IT‐related areas. Moreover, it equips practitioners with an initial checklist of pre‐requisites for undertaking such performance management systems.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 60 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Emad M. Kamhawi

The purpose of this study is to provide better understanding of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems adoption, as well as non‐adoption practices in a less developed…

3575

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide better understanding of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems adoption, as well as non‐adoption practices in a less developed country setting, namely Bahrain.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method was employed to elicit opinions from IT executives from two types of companies: those which adopted ERP systems and those which so far have not.

Findings

The study highlighted the benefits, motives and barriers of implementing such systems. Moreover, for those which have not experienced these practices before, it investigated the reasons behind not implementing these systems, executives' attitudes, and future intentions towards these systems. Implications and insights for businesses, ERP systems' vendors, educators, and researchers have been discussed based on the results of the survey.

Originality/value

This study extends research efforts concerning the adoption of ERP systems to include strategic and decision‐making aspects of evaluation, which have not had appropriate attention from past research. It explores connections between these two aspects with other classical ones such as operational and technical dimensions of evaluation. Responding to repetitive research calls for appropriately scrutinizing adoption practices of this technology in different countries – especially developing ones – the paper presents the results of a survey of ERP systems adoption in Bahrain.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Emad M. Kamhawi

This paper aims to examine the possible underlying factors that influence managers' intentions towards adopting business process reengineering (BPR) in a less‐developed…

1482

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the possible underlying factors that influence managers' intentions towards adopting business process reengineering (BPR) in a less‐developed country (LDC) context, namely Bahrain.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a survey method to elicit opinions from 104 managers from 14 different big Bahraini businesses.

Findings

The results showed that the existence of some organizational capabilities such as “effective project management experiences” and “the ability to build an organizational‐wide need for change” are important requisites to gain positive salient beliefs toward accepting BPR. Moreover, it showed that “managers' cognitive style” and “level of education” had significant influences on their “intentions to adopt BPR approach.” The findings also suggest that other external factors such as “competitive pressures” and “managers' beliefs about BPR” are significant antecedents to BPR perceived ease of use.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions are drawn about BPR experiences in countries such as Bahrain. Those experiences are compared and contrasted with the related prior studies, which are mainly from western countries' practices. Possible future research issues are raised to extend the author understanding of how BPR initiatives are promoted in organizations. However, the sample was limited to one LDC, which limits the possibility of generalizing its findings to all less‐developed countries.

Originality/value

The study provides insights into the required organizational capabilities, circumstances, and/or beliefs that ease promoting BPR initiatives in businesses. Accordingly, possible‐related strategies can be devised to enhance BPR practices in organizations.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Zahir Irani and Ahmad Ghoneim

48

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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