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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2017

Pietro Cunha Dolci, Antonio Carlos Gastaud Maçada and Ely Laureano Paiva

The purpose of this study is to develop models and analyse the influence of supply chain governance (SCG) and its conceptions (contractual, relational and transactional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop models and analyse the influence of supply chain governance (SCG) and its conceptions (contractual, relational and transactional) on supply chain performance (SCP).

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case studies and survey methods were used. Data collection in the multiple case studies was performed by in-depth interviews with supply chain executives from top strategic levels in six companies. The research instrument was applied to 185 executives from large companies that possessed a broad, complex supply chain in Brazil.

Findings

It was identified that SCG, comprising contractual, relational and transactional aspects, has a positive influence on operational and financial SCP. SCG was found to be a more comprehensive view of the supply chain that focuses on more strategic aspects and long-term inter-organizational relationships. SCG affects SCP, primarily in the operational aspects with regard to global costs and in the financial aspects of investment return.

Originality/value

SCG is a topic that has been widely studied in recent years for analysing inter-organizational relations as a multi-dimensional phenomenon embedded in the company’s structures and processes. Studies analysing all aspects of SCG at the same time, however, have not been found. Moreover, there are a number of performance indicators, but there is a lack of consensus on what determines the performance of these supply chains. Furthermore, few studies have attempted to understand the effects of SCG on supply chain performance.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2018

Camila Lee Park and Ely Laureano Paiva

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the extent to which different patterns of cross-functional integration and the operations strategy (OS) process may be explained by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the extent to which different patterns of cross-functional integration and the operations strategy (OS) process may be explained by national cultures differences.

Design/methodology/approach

Perceptual survey data from 105 manufacturing plants in four countries were used to validate the constructs and to test the hypotheses. The plants are located in two Western and two Eastern countries with different industrialization and development backgrounds (Brazil, China, Germany and South Korea). CFA validated the constructs, and ANOVA and t-tests evaluated the differences between levels of four Hofstede’s elements (i.e. power distance, individualism vs collectivism, uncertainty avoidance and long-term vs short-term orientation) on the OS process enablers (i.e. leadership for cross-functional integration and functional integration) and elements (i.e. manufacturing strategy linkage to corporate strategy and formulation of manufacturing strategy).

Findings

Results suggest that different OS and OM processes are present in different national cultures. Leadership for cross-functional integration and manufacturing strategy linkage to corporate strategy differ between levels of power distance, individualism vs collectivism and uncertainty avoidance. Functional integration and formulation of manufacturing strategy also present differences according to the degree of individualism vs collectivism and long-term orientation.

Originality/value

Results indicate that national culture is a key aspect for the OS process. Prior studies usually do not consider cultural aspects. Therefore, the OS process varies in different countries and contexts. Managers need to adjust their OS process when they are developing a global OS.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2020

Mauro Fracarolli Nunes, Camila Lee Park and Ely Laureano Paiva

The study investigates the interaction of sustainability dimensions in supply chains. Along with the analysis of sustainability trade-offs (i.e. prioritizing one dimension…

Abstract

Purpose

The study investigates the interaction of sustainability dimensions in supply chains. Along with the analysis of sustainability trade-offs (i.e. prioritizing one dimension to the sacrifice of others), we develop and test the concept of cross-insurance mechanism (i.e. meeting of one sustainability goal possibly attenuating the effects of poor performance in another).

Design/methodology/approach

Through the analysis of a 20-variation vignette-based experiment, we evaluate the effects of these issues on the corporate credibility (expertise and trustworthiness) of four tiers of a typical food supply chain: pesticide producers, farmers, companies from the food industry and retail chains.

Findings

Results suggest that both sustainability trade-offs and cross-insurance mechanisms have different impacts across the chain. While pesticide producers (first tier) and retail chains (fourth tier) seem to respond better to a social trade-off, the social cross-insurance mechanism has shown to be particularly beneficial to companies from the food industry (third tier). Farmers (second tier), in turn, seem to be more sensitive to the economic cross-insurance mechanism.

Originality/value

Along with adding to the study of sustainability trade-offs in supply chain contexts, results suggest that the efficiency of the insurance mechanism is not conditional on the alignment among sustainability dimensions (i.e. social responsibility attenuating social irresponsibility). In this sense, empirical evidences support the development of the cross-insurance mechanism as an original concept.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2018

Solange Mata Machado, Ely Laureano Paiva and Eliciane Maria da Silva

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how companies develop mitigation capabilities in their supply chains in order to reduce the negative impacts of counterfeiting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how companies develop mitigation capabilities in their supply chains in order to reduce the negative impacts of counterfeiting.

Design/methodology/approach

Five cases with two types of supply chain are analyzed: B2B (clothing, footwear and toys) and B2C (automotive). Data gathering was based on interviews, while secondary data were obtained directly from trade associations.

Findings

Companies presented different levels of proactivity for counterfeiting resilience. Companies with a lower level of appetite for risk are more proactive and have a broad number of mitigation capabilities. These companies develop intelligence that is required for combating counterfeiting and the capabilities needed for addressing its ex ante and ex post phases.

Research limitations/implications

The research examines a complex and controversial subject about which there is limited information. The case studies are limited to Brazilian companies and the local subsidiaries of foreign companies. Therefore, the specific context may influence the study findings and reduce their generalizability.

Practical implications

Mitigation capabilities enable companies to minimize the negative impact of counterfeiting and make companies more resilient to counterfeiting activities. The findings indicate that when managers allocate resources in earlier phases of counterfeiting, losses are lower.

Originality/value

This study shows the development process of mitigation capabilities in the ex ante and post-disruption phases of counterfeiting.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Dr Edgar E. Blanco and Dr Ely Laureano Paiva

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Ely Laureano Paiva, Elena Revilla Gutierrez and Aleda V. Roth

This paper aims to analyze manufacturing strategy process (MSP) from a knowledge‐based view (KBV) of the firm. MSP considers the ways that manufacturing organizes its

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze manufacturing strategy process (MSP) from a knowledge‐based view (KBV) of the firm. MSP considers the ways that manufacturing organizes its resources in order to create/strengthen manufacturing‐related capabilities. In this context, managers often are under pressure to find quick answers in highly complex environments. By viewing MSP as a knowledge creation process, managers may choose a company's objectives based upon previous experiences and knowledge. MSP addresses the level of planning and decision making related to building competitive operations capabilities over the long term.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research was used to make cross‐country comparison. The constructs were empirically confirmed in both country samples, attesting to measurement invariance. The proposed model was tested in both samples and analyzed the differences between them.

Findings

The results suggest that knowledge is a key resource in MSP in both samples. Resource‐based orientation presents higher levels of influence over MSP in Brazil. In the Spanish sample the influence of external knowledge in MSP and market performance is more relevant.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this study is that the Brazilian sample is located in a specific region and therefore some regional characteristics may be present. Another limitation was the use of a questionnaire in two different countries that was originally developed in a non‐native language.

Practical implications

As a practical implication, manufacturing should seek to integrate the strategic process in order to be more responsive in dynamic environments.

Originality/value

The paper uses a cross‐country sample for scale validation, which is rare in management research. Manufacturing strategy process was analyzed from a knowledge‐based view, bringing new possibilities for academic studies. For managers, the paper highlights the importance of manufacturing developing a proactive role through knowledge integration in cross‐functional activities during the strategic process.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Ely Laureano Paiva and Luciana Marques Vieira

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of operations management in the development of international operations – international operations being considered as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of operations management in the development of international operations – international operations being considered as distribution centers, services and manufacturing plants abroad.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model evaluates the relationship between international operations, cross‐functional orientation (CFO) and company's exports performance. A survey was carried out with 99 companies from two industries (machinery and food) located in a newly industrialized country. The data were analyzed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results suggest the existence of a relation between international operations to company's performance and also that international operations are positively related to CFO.

Research limitations/implications

The sampling frame is limited to only two industries: machinery and food and to companies located in southern Brazil.

Originality/value

The paper is of value in showing how the process of internationalization should be an integrated action which leads to better performance. This is especially important for companies starting their internationalization process and should be tested in other industries and countries.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Ely Laureano Paiva, Aleda V. Roth and Jaime Evaldo Fensterseifer

This paper addresses, from a knowledge management perspective, the following question: How are companies choosing the information that is considered more important for the…

Abstract

This paper addresses, from a knowledge management perspective, the following question: How are companies choosing the information that is considered more important for the management of the manufacturing process? We analyze empirically, from a strategic approach, how different types and sources of information may influence information characteristics like accuracy, access, and timing. In addition, we also evaluate how information is related to manufacturing competencies and performance. The results indicate that customer‐focused information and information technologies (IT) are the most important aspects that influence information characteristics.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 102 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Ely Laureano Paiva, Rafael Teixeira, Luciana Marques Vieira and Andrew Beheregaray Finger

– The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between supply planning, trust and integration, and the influence of them on operational performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between supply planning, trust and integration, and the influence of them on operational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used a survey with 335 respondents from three different industries. The paper analyzed the data with structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results suggest that supply planning and trust are positively related and both influence supply integration and operational performance. At the end the paper proposed a classification for supply integration based on planning use and trust.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is composed by companies from only three industries (machinery, electronics and automobile), what does not allow generalization.

Practical implications

Managers are challenged to develop simultaneously supply chain planning practices and trust-based relationship within buyers and suppliers. They must pay attention to different integration drivers and use them accordingly and in the context analyzed. The study suggests a 2×2 matrix that might help managers’ decision making.

Originality/value

Despite the importance of planning in supply and manufacturing management, few papers analyzed the role of supply planning integrated to trust. The combination between these aspects brings a more realistic and pragmatic view of the supply chain management.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 114 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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