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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Lan Guo, Jutta Tobias, Elliot Bendoly and Yuming Hu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the antecedents and performance consequences of voluntary information exchange between the production and sales functions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the antecedents and performance consequences of voluntary information exchange between the production and sales functions.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on the motivation-opportunity-ability framework, the authors first posit a general model for bilateral information exchange across functional levels. The innovation presented in this model consists in allowing both sides of such an exchange (e.g. production-to-sales and sales-to-production) to differ in the perceived adequacy of information they receive. The two sides can also differ in terms of how their motivation and ability impact that adequacy. To test the model, the authors make use of survey responses and objective data from sales, production and executive managers of 182 Chinese manufacturers.

Findings

Analysis of the sample shows that the sales-to-production exchange has a smaller estimated performance effect than the production-to-sales exchange. Although shared opportunity is important in predicting both sides of the exchange, the measure of motivation appears to only significantly impact the sales-to-production exchange. In contrast, the measure of ability only appears to significantly affect the production-to-sales exchange.

Research limitations/implications

Although limited to a regional context, differences in information-sharing drivers on the two sides of production-sales dyads pose strong implications that may be generalizable.

Practical implications

Specifically, these findings suggest alternative approaches and foci for resource investment that higher level managers can leverage in developing more effective cross-functional work settings.

Originality/value

This study differentiates itself from extant literature on information sharing by focusing on cross-functional (vs intra-functional) and voluntary (vs routine) information exchange.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2008

Elliot Bendoly and Mike Prietula

The purpose of this paper is to examine how training specific to a given operational task, and subsequent experiential learning, can heighten skill and hence shift the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how training specific to a given operational task, and subsequent experiential learning, can heighten skill and hence shift the level of workload at which individuals are most productively motivated.

Design/methodology/approach

To analyze these effects, a laboratory experiment was used involving a vehicle routing application and 156 managers exposed to a 2 × 3 complete treatment design. Both multi‐period objective in‐task data and subjective self reports are collected to tap into skill levels, actions and behavioral variables of interest.

Findings

In the absence of additional workload challenges, the paper finds that increases in skill may in fact significantly limit and in some cases actually degrade overall motivation, as well as objective performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations potentially stem from specific operationalizations of the factors studied as well as selectivity of the subject pool and the context (vehicle routing task).

Practical implications

The implications of the skill‐challenge‐motivation dynamics observed have direct repercussions for existing management models in which training and experience are viewed as having strictly monotonic benefits to performance. The implications also go far to promote more informed models of worker behavior in operations modeling that otherwise view performance as static or monotonically increasing based on experience.

Originality/value

This is believed to be the first study that has explicitly studied the inverted‐U dynamics stemming from the interplay of both skill and workload on motivation and performance, over a multi‐period framework of analysis.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Elliot Bendoly and Tobias Schoenherr

The purpose of this work is to empirically demonstrate the synergistic implications of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems and emerging intra‐organizational technologies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this work is to empirically demonstrate the synergistic implications of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems and emerging intra‐organizational technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

Using established operational theory as a foundation, the article analyzes the history of ERP use and its impact on gains from business‐to‐business (B2B) purchasing technologies.

Findings

The findings reveal that the extent to which firms witness maintenance‐repair‐operating (MRO) savings through such procurement is dependent not only on the presence of an ERP system, but also on the length of time systems have been in use.

Research limitations/implications

Although limited to the analysis of B2B “success” cases, the results provide strong implications for the importance of ERP as a key infrastructure for B2B activities.

Practical implications

Managers seeking to benefit from B2B economies, should ensure that they possess an adequate IT infrastructure (e.g. ERP) to realize all such potential gains.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first works to demonstrate the link between ERP and B2B benefits solely through the use of objective secondary data.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Elliot Bendoly, Daniel G. Bachrach, Hui Wang and Shouyang Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to test the existence of direct and moderating effects of task interdependence and culture on supervisory views of enterprise resource…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the existence of direct and moderating effects of task interdependence and culture on supervisory views of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems.

Design/methodology/approach

To analyze these effects, an experiment was conducted in the USA and The People's Republic of China. A total of 304 management supervisors participated. Participants were exposed to an interdependence manipulation and then rated the importance of ERP in the case contexts described by experimental treatments.

Findings

Results support the moderating effects of culture on the extent to which task interdependence impacts managerial views of the communicative capabilities of ERP systems. Task interdependence effects are much less severe among the views of Chinese managers.

Research limitations/implications

Main limitations potentially stem from our specific operationalizations of the factors studied as well as selectivity of the subject pool. As with many empirical comparisons of culture, these limitations may confine the application of the findings to the two national contexts studied.

Practical implications

If managers in China (as compared to their US counterparts) are more enthusiastic of the communication capabilities provided by ERP systems regardless of the extent to which internal processes are interdependent, then the business cases that support ERP adoption and extension should be expected to emphasize the benefits of such capabilities. This may foster a strategic distinction in the use of these architectures in the two settings.

Originality/value

This study specifically examines the interactive effects of task interdependency and culture on managerial perceptions regarding ERP communicative capabilities.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Elliot Bendoly

The purpose of this paper is to inform the general management community on the qualitative and visualization capabilities available to them through Excel.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to inform the general management community on the qualitative and visualization capabilities available to them through Excel.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a basic overview and illustration of a subset set of qualitative capabilities, along with some brief tutorials and tips on how to make use of these capabilities. Discussions are aimed at novices and those with experience in Excel alike. A reference for more in‐depth discussions and guidance is provided.

Practical implications

Access to novel and powerful capabilities that have traditionally been under‐utilized in Excel are within grasp of any management research or practitioner, provided they know where to find some basic guidance and are intrepid enough to test it out. The wave of new, tech‐savvy management users is likely to have a pivotal impact on the way technology‐assisted decision making is thought of in the future.

Originality/value

The opportunity to open the eyes of a wider audience to the convenience and power of Excel as a development, decision support, research and teaching tool is of critical value. This work suggests that such awareness may be instrumental in changing the climate of organizational technology perspectives across a wide range of fields of practice.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 32 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Elliot Bendoly and F. Robert Jacobs

The selection of an appropriate enterprise resource planning (ERP) solution remains a complicated task. Since the fundamental role of an ERP solution is to support…

Abstract

The selection of an appropriate enterprise resource planning (ERP) solution remains a complicated task. Since the fundamental role of an ERP solution is to support corporate operations, a key consideration is its alignment with the process requirements of the firm. This work is an investigation into the impact that this alignment has on perceived operational performance. Data are collected using a survey administered to representatives of the machine manufacturing industry. The findings suggest that the alignment of ERP solutions with operational needs is crucial to perceived ability to deliver orders on time and to general satisfaction with the ERP solution.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Abstract

Details

Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Ben Clegg and Yi Wan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems development and emerging practices in the management of enterprises (i.e. parts of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems development and emerging practices in the management of enterprises (i.e. parts of companies working with parts of other companies to deliver a complex product and/or service) and identify any apparent correlations. Suitable a priori contingency frameworks are then used and extended to explain apparent correlations. Discussion is given to provide guidance for researchers and practitioners to deliver better strategic, structural and operational competitive advantage through this approach; coined here as the “enterprization of operations”.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical induction uses a new empirical longitudinal case study from Zoomlion (a Chinese manufacturing company) built using an adapted form of template analysis to produce a new contingency framework.

Findings

Three main types of enterprises and the three main types of ERP systems are defined and correlations between them are explained. Two relevant a priori frameworks are used to induct a new contingency model to support the enterprization of operations; known as the dynamic enterprise reference grid for ERP (DERG-ERP).

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on one longitudinal case study. Further case studies are currently being conducted in the UK and China.

Practical implications

The new contingency model, the DERG-ERP, serves as a guide for ERP vendors, information systems management and operations managers hoping to grow and sustain their competitive advantage with respect to effective enterprise strategy, enterprise structure and ERP systems.

Originality/value

This research explains how ERP systems and the effective management of enterprises should develop in order to sustain competitive advantage with respect to enterprise strategy, enterprise structure and ERP systems use.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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