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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Paul Preenen, Sarike Verbiest, Annelies Van Vianen and Ellen Van Wijk

The purpose of this paper is to develop and investigate the idea that self-profiling and career control by temporary agency workers (TAWs) in low-skill jobs are positively…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and investigate the idea that self-profiling and career control by temporary agency workers (TAWs) in low-skill jobs are positively related to informal learning and that this relationship is mediated by job challenge.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey study was conducted among 722 TAWs in low-skill jobs in the Netherlands. Bootstrap mediation analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Self-profiling and career control are positively related to informal learning of TAWs and these relationships are mediated by job challenge.

Research limitations/implications

This is the first study to develop and empirically test the proposition that self-profiling and career control are important factors for enhancing employees’ learning experiences in low-skill jobs.

Practical implications

Hiring companies and temporary work agencies could stimulate and train TAWs’ self-profiling and career control competencies to enhance their job challenge and informal learning. Organizations should consider assigning challenging tasks to TAWs, which may be a good alternative for expensive formal training programs.

Social implications

Many TAWs in low-skill jobs do not possess the skills and capacities to obtain a better or more secure job. In general, temporary workers face a higher risk of unemployment and greater income volatility (Segal and Sullivan, 1997). Gaining knowledge about how to develop this group is important for society as a whole.

Originality/value

Research on the determinants of informal learning mainly concerned higher-educated employees and managers with long-term contracts (e.g. Dong et al., 2014), whereas very little is known about factors that stimulate informal learning among TAWs in general, and among TAWs in low-skill jobs in particular.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2016

Jiska Eelen, Fabiënne Rauwers, Verena M. Wottrich, Hilde A. M. Voorveld and Guda van Noort

This chapter provides an overview of the state of knowledge about creative media advertising; choosing a novel medium that implicitly communicates the message. It explains…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides an overview of the state of knowledge about creative media advertising; choosing a novel medium that implicitly communicates the message. It explains what creative media advertising is and how it differs from other unconventional marketing communication formats. It addresses the theoretical mechanisms that explain how creative media affects consumers. Its final purpose is to review all the empirical findings about creative media advertising effects.

Methodology/approach

This chapter presents a systematic literature review of all the empirical research about creative media advertising that explicitly compares its effectiveness with traditional media advertising. The 11 reviewed articles with 16 experiments appeared between 2005 and 2015.

Findings

Overall creative media advertising generated positive evaluative outcomes (e.g., brand attitude) and behavior (e.g., word of mouth and sales). These effects were often mediated by a feeling of surprise and an increase in positive thoughts. It remains unclear whether creative media are perceived as persuasion attempts. Mixed findings exist for cognitive outcomes. Creative media advertising seems beneficial for creating strong brand associations, but brand memory might suffer from the technique if solving the link between the medium and the message takes away mental resources for the brand elements in the advertisement.

Originality/value

By reviewing all the literature about creative media advertising, the authors make recommendations for future research and for using creative media in practice. They emphasize potential boundary conditions and ideal circumstances of using creative media advertising.

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2018

Ana Pinto Borges, Elvira Pacheco Vieira and Paula Rodrigues

The purpose of this paper is to assess the perception of the city of Porto as a destination engaged with social responsibility practices. The authors intend to analyse if…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the perception of the city of Porto as a destination engaged with social responsibility practices. The authors intend to analyse if the national and international tourists know the social responsibility practices of the city and if they associate them to the domains of community, environment and customer presented by Öberseder et al. (2014) and the type of CSR image that is presented (Dean, 2002; Lichtenstein et al., 2004; Menon and Kahn, 2003).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a survey to assess the perception of the tourist regarding the social responsibility practices of the city of Porto. The authors applied a factorial analysis and a logistic regression.

Findings

The tourists showed an adequate knowledge regarding the social responsibility practices carried out by the city. The respondents separated the dimensions of perceptions of CSR and revealed that they influence the (re)visit and further recommendation of the city. More specifically, the authors also verified that the CSR image and community, environment and customer domains play an important role in the knowledge of the social responsibility practices engaged by the city of Porto.

Originality/value

It is the first time that the scales of Öberseder et al. (2014) and Dean (2002), Lichtenstein et al. (2004) and Menon and Kahn (2003) were applied in the tourism context. Furthermore, considering that the city of Porto presents a high level of growth in tourism related activities, it is important to study the impact of CSR in the development of a sustainable tourism and its impact on the (re)visit and recommendation.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Ana M. Arboleda, Carlos Arce-Lopera and Samuel González

The purpose of this paper is evaluate to what extent consumers can recognise a scent within a context that is congruent either with the product or with the user…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is evaluate to what extent consumers can recognise a scent within a context that is congruent either with the product or with the user, respectively, objects’ quality or subjects’ involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper consists of two experimental studies. The first study assesses people’s capacity to recognise three scents: leather, synthetic leather, and fabric. The second study assesses the way in which a frame of reference (quality or involvement) affects people’s capacity for scent recognition (leather and fabric).

Findings

Results confirm the difficulty of scent recognition revealing, in the first study, a low level of consistency in subjects’ responses. The second study shows an interaction between the type of scent and consumers’ framework: subjects who are primed to think about product quality present more accurate scent recognition when they smell leather, whereas subjects who are primed to think about themselves present more accurate scent recognition when they smell fabric.

Practical implications

These results can be used in brand communication. A scent, such as that of leather, should highlight quality attributes in its communication. If the product is unscented, communication should highlight the subject who uses the product.

Originality/value

Previous studies show the importance of the consistency between scent and product marketing strategies. This study complements these findings by differentiating the context where a scent is presented considering either the product (the object’s quality attributes) or the individual who uses that product (subject’s involvement).

Propósito

Este estudio evalúa en qué medida los consumidores pueden reconocer un aroma en un contexto congruente con el producto o con el usuario, respectivamente, calidad del objeto o involucramiento del sujeto.

Diseño/metodología/aproximación

Este artículo consiste en dos estudios experimentales. El primero evalúa la capacidad de los individuos para reconocer tres aromas: cuero, cuero sintético y tela. El segundo estudio evalúa de qué forma un contexto de referencia (calidad o involucramiento) influye en la capacidad para reconocer un aroma (cuero y tela).

Hallazgos

Los resultados confirman la dificultad para el reconocimiento del aroma mostrando, en el primer estudio, un bajo nivel de consistencia en las respuestas de los sujetos. El segundo estudio muestra una interacción entre el tipo de aroma y el contexto de los consumidores: Sujetos que se les induce a pensar en la calidad del producto tienen un reconocimiento del aroma más acertado cuando huelen cuero; mientras que sujetos que se inducen a pensar en sí mismos tienen un reconocimiento del aroma más acertado cuando huelen tela.

Implicaciones prácticas

Los resultados pueden ser utilizados en la comunicación de la marca. Un aroma, como el del cuero, deberá destacar en la comunicación atributos de calidad. Si el producto no tiene aroma, la comunicación debe destacar el sujeto que usa el producto.

Originalidad/valor

Estudios previos señalan la importancia de la consistencia entre el aroma y las estrategias de mercadeo de un producto. Este estudio complementa estos hallazgos diferenciando el contexto en el que se presenta un aroma considerando el producto (atributos de calidad del objeto) o el individuo quien lo usa (involucramiento del sujeto).

Details

Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1012-8255

Keywords

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