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Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2022

Jennifer Rogan, Frank Fürstenberg and Andreas Wieland

Manufacturing companies today are part of a dynamic, globalized system of production and consumption. Globally dividing labor is now the predominant way of organizing…

Abstract

Manufacturing companies today are part of a dynamic, globalized system of production and consumption. Globally dividing labor is now the predominant way of organizing business, but it is clear that the resource demands of linear supply chains have created vulnerability and harm in the system and beyond. The authors draw inspiration from ecology to explore the role of manufacturers in the transition from linear to circular supply chains. Borrowing the adaptive cycle model, originally developed to describe dynamic ecological systems, they employ case examples to illustrate the ways that supply chain management is being reimagined in the shift to a circular economy. This conceptualization uses the adaptive cycle to consider the transition from linear to circular supply chains as part of broader systems change, and the opportunities for manufacturers to play a transformative role in shaping a sustainable future.

Details

Circular Economy Supply Chains: From Chains to Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-545-3

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 16 May 2022

Kim Poldner and Rolien Blanken

Teaching formats for both BA/MA students and MBA/PhD students in sustainable entrepreneurship and strategic management are offered in the teaching notes.

Abstract

Study level/applicability

Teaching formats for both BA/MA students and MBA/PhD students in sustainable entrepreneurship and strategic management are offered in the teaching notes.

Subject area

This case juxtaposes the company’s core values of gender equality, sustainability and inclusivity, with the financial pressures of expanding global operations in COVID-19 times.

Case overview

This case illustrates the founding and growth of i-did in the broader context of the global circular textile industry. Being the first company that reclaims value of discarded textiles by making design products out of felt, the dilemma is on how i-did can create a blueprint for sustainable leadership in a scalable (financial) business case.

Expected learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of this case are as follows: to understand the concepts of circular economy and social impact and how they can be translated to business; to apply their knowledge of strategy and entrepreneurship for sustainable business innovation; to be able to analyze a company according to the Sustainable Development Goals, specifically around gender issues, inclusivity and diversity; to evaluate opportunities for multiple value creation in business; and to have the knowledge and capacity to create a circular business with the help of the Business Model Template.

Social implications

This case engages students in critically reflecting on sustainability concepts in relation to i-did (theoretical value) and applying novel business model innovation tools to a real-world enterprise (practical value). The students get the chance to explore the ethical challenges the two entrepreneurial leaders face between short-term economic gains (or maybe even survival) and their core values of (gender) inclusivity, circularity and diversity.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes and a summarizing two-pager are available for educators.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

The Case For Women, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2732-4443

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2019

Peter Jones and Martin George Wynn

This paper aims to review some of the academic literature on the circular economy, natural capital and resilience by tourism and hospitality scholars and to examine how a…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review some of the academic literature on the circular economy, natural capital and resilience by tourism and hospitality scholars and to examine how a number of companies and industry bodies within the tourism and hospitality industry have used these concepts in their business operations and development plans.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines the importance of sustainability to the tourism and hospitality industry and provides definitions of the concepts of the circular economy, natural capital and resilience. The paper reviews some of the academic literature on these concepts, explores how a number of companies and industry bodies within the tourism and hospitality industry have used them in their business and planning operations and identifies a number of future directions for academic research and managerial contributions.

Findings

The concepts illuminate a range of sustainability challenges and opportunities, and some companies use these concepts in their sustainability strategies and development planning. The current depth of theoretical understanding does not lend itself to management strategies, but one fruitful avenue is to explore how information systems can be better deployed to support these concepts and sustainability management in general.

Originality/value

The paper provides an accessible exploratory review of how academics and companies are focussing on the concepts of the circular economy, natural capital and resilience in the tourism and hospitality industry. As such, it will be of interest to academics, students and practitioners interested in the hospitality industry.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Ellen McArthur

– The purpose of this paper is to present historical research on marketing practices in department stores of the 1880-1930 period using primary source records from Australia.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present historical research on marketing practices in department stores of the 1880-1930 period using primary source records from Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from primary records including retail trade journals, mass circulation newspapers, and other contemporary sources, but mainly from the archives of The Master Retailers' Association (MRA). The MRA was the dominant industry employers' organisation in Australia, and possibly the first retail association of its kind in the Western world. Secondary sources have also been used to supplement the primary records, and to provide context, and cross-cultural comparisons.

Findings

The findings demonstrate the antecedents of a range of marketing practices that today we presume are modern, including sales promotion, trade promotion, direct mail, destination retailing, advertising, and consumer segmentation. This supports other scholars' research into marketing's long history.

Originality/value

This paper contributes original knowledge to the neglected field of Australian marketing history and connects the pioneering practices of retailers to the broader field of marketing. While some outstanding retail histories exist for the USA, UK, and France, the Australian story has remained largely uncovered.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Claudia E. Henninger

Swapping as part of collaborative consumption is not a new phenomenon per se, but might gain increased importance after the recent COVID-19 pandemic that has seen a shift…

Abstract

Swapping as part of collaborative consumption is not a new phenomenon per se, but might gain increased importance after the recent COVID-19 pandemic that has seen a shift in consumer attitudes, consumption, and disposal behaviour. Swapping as one form of collaborative consumption, however, is currently neither mainstream nor target towards the general population, but rather a niche population (secondhand consumers). With sustainable issues (environmental, economic, and social) remaining a key concern, and consumers seeking to dispose of their garments, swapping might become an increasingly attractive alternative, yet currently it may not be communicated as such. This chapter explores the potential of creative marketing communications to enhance the uptake of swapping in order to overcome a key challenge in the industry: fashion waste.

Details

Creativity and Marketing: The Fuel for Success
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-330-7

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

D.G. Brian Jones and Mark Tadajewski

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Abstract

Details

Creativity and Marketing: The Fuel for Success
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-330-7

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2022

Scott James Davies and José Luis Egas

The objective of the study is to investigate whether hospitality leaders feel there is a circular economy (CE) created through corporate social responsibility (CSR…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the study is to investigate whether hospitality leaders feel there is a circular economy (CE) created through corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives and whether these initiatives improve quality of work life (QWL) for employees. A qualitative, case study approach was adopted which included a set of standardized questions as a discussion tool to explore senior hospitality professionals' perceptions of their companies' CSR initiatives and connection between CSR and QWL.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of interview questions consisting of seven open-ended questions and four Likert-type scale questions were formulated to explore how the representatives from case study companies implement CSR initiatives in the workplace. The questions were also used to probe the impact of CSR initiatives on QWL for employees and additionally, respondent views on aspects of the CE.

Findings

Examines the impact of hospitality and tourism on the environment and also its employee retention challenges. Interviews conducted with three managers reveal awareness of the potential QWL benefits of CSR practices. Findings suggest that successful, on-the-ground practice involves adapting corporate principles for each property.

Originality/value

The article showcases three interviews with senior employees from different properties in different world regions. The aim being to probe, how they approach their CSR strategies and the impact on QoL. While there is much interest in these issues, comparatively little has been published to-date on the relationships between CSR and QoL.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2021

Yekta Bakırlıoğlu, Nazlı Terzioğlu, Sine Celik, Ainur Ulan and Jordi Segalas

This paper aims to present key characteristics of educational design briefs for the circular economy (CE) through the analysis of 11 design briefs focussing on real-life…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present key characteristics of educational design briefs for the circular economy (CE) through the analysis of 11 design briefs focussing on real-life challenges related to sustainability and the CE, developed with collaborating industry partners for four consecutive circular design internships conducted in Ireland, Catalunya, The Netherlands and Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

These four internships were conducted between September 2017 and June 2019 and each internship lasted three to four months. The supervisors for each internship collaborated with local industry partners genuinely interested in adopting sustainable business practices to develop design briefs focussing on real-life challenges they face. The briefs for each internship were developed further according to the feedback of the interns, industry partners and supervisors of previous internships.

Findings

Five steps of brief making for circular design were identified as reviewing the existing resources, emphasizing the importance of systems thinking, emphasizing the importance of collaboration for the CE, focussing on circularity and communicating expectations. The paper outlines how design briefs changed throughout the consecutive internships according to the different curricula and the characteristics of an educational circular design brief.

Originality/value

For design educators and researchers, the value of this paper lies in presenting the steps for the brief making of educational circular design projects. Additionally, the characteristics of circular design briefs are outlined, discussing their focus and content to act as a guide for design educators.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Robert W. Bogue

To describe a new optical fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensor system, based on a novel time division multiplexing technique, which is being commercialised by UK start‐up…

Abstract

Purpose

To describe a new optical fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensor system, based on a novel time division multiplexing technique, which is being commercialised by UK start‐up Insensys. This new technique allows sensor costs to be reduced dramatically and also yields operational benefits.Design/methodology/approach – The system uses time division multiplexing (TDM) rather than wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) to interrogate the sensors. All the FBG sensors are written at the same wavelength and the interrogation unit receives a number of pulses from each grating. These pulses arrive at a time determined by the grating distance from the interrogator and one grating sensor can be distinguished from another by analysing the pulse arrival times. As a result, there is no need for a tuneable laser or filter and a single mask can be used to write all of the gratings, thus reducing both manufacturing and component costs.Findings – This design has led to lower costs and allows up to 100 strain or temperature sensors to be incorporated into a single channel system, rather than around 4, which is the norm for conventional WDM systems. The company is now in production and has orders for systems to monitor the strain in wind turbine blades, to measure temperature profiles in oil wells and to monitor the stress in composite structures.Originality/value – This TDM‐based design allows FBG sensor systems to measure far more points per fibre than is possible with conventional WDM system, combined with lower system costs. Applications are being found in the marine, aerospace, offshore and power generation industries.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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