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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Ellen Belcher and Ellen Sexton

The purpose of this paper is to present the process, challenges and lessons learned from carrying out a small digital project to create a web resource of unique historic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the process, challenges and lessons learned from carrying out a small digital project to create a web resource of unique historic materials related to crime in New York City. All aspects of digital project management are discussed, including selection, infrastructure, budgeting, workflow and delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

Experiences from project administration, including management of a combination in‐house and outsourced digitization and metadata are discussed. Formation and management of the resulting web resource is explained, which is the product of a creative amalgamation of commercial and open source software. Challenges encountered are presented with suggestions for practical solutions and considerations for future projects.

Findings

This grant‐funded pilot project presented foreseen and unforeseen problems. Lessons learned and solutions suggesting best approaches for a small‐scale digitization project are presented here.

Practical implications

In this paper best practices and suggestions for managing a small digital project are presented, including financial, staffing and technical considerations.

Originality/value

Unlike many other discussions that focus on management of large institutional projects, this study presents an incremental approach for small‐scale digitization projects. Presented here are practical uses of available applications for establishing project infrastructure to sustain and continue growth of digital content for small institutions.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Ann Marie Fiore and Jihyun Kim

In line with changes in consumer demand, models used in empirical study of the shopping experience have expanded. Reflecting the integrative (experiential and utilitarian…

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13343

Abstract

Purpose

In line with changes in consumer demand, models used in empirical study of the shopping experience have expanded. Reflecting the integrative (experiential and utilitarian) nature of shopping experience, the paper aims to propose an overarching stimulus‐organism‐response based shopping experience framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper offers a framework that integrates components of both the hedonic experience related consciousness‐emotion‐value model and the utilitarian experience‐related cognition‐affect‐behavior model. In this paper, articles crossing hedonic and utilitarian boundaries are briefly presented, and the array of variables used in empirical studies of shopping experience, with an emphasis on brick‐and‐mortar shopping experiences, are synthesized for each component of the framework.

Findings

The resulting framework is an inclusive overarching structure that explains the consumer shopping experience. This framework is useful for both academia and industry. It may help orient academics to the diverse body of existing shopping experience literature and help researchers develop empirical studies blurring hedonic and utilitarian boundaries of consumer experience. For industry professionals, it may be used to guide development of successful shopping experiences.

Research limitations/implications

The paper does not provide empirical testing of the proposed framework. However, the paper suggests directions for future research, including empirically examining the framework's structural relationships.

Originality/value

The paper presents the framework as a means of giving order to the ever‐expanding body of shopping experience literature.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Paula Fitzgerald Bone

Examines the mature market, defined as consumers age 50 years orolder, and reviews 33 segmentation methods for the mature market andidentifies five key segmentation…

Abstract

Examines the mature market, defined as consumers age 50 years or older, and reviews 33 segmentation methods for the mature market and identifies five key segmentation criteria: discretionary income, health, activity level, discretionary time, and response to others. Integrates methods devised by other researchers and provides marketers with a step‐by‐step, actionable segmentation method based on these five criteria. Offers implications for managers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Lorraine Palmer

This article discusses information sources and critical interpretations of Mary Shelley's life and her most important work, Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus. In…

Abstract

This article discusses information sources and critical interpretations of Mary Shelley's life and her most important work, Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus. In addition to publishing history and information about revisions, translations, inclusion in collections, and references to possible sources of the story, it will evaluate some biographical material about Mary Shelley and her family, and their influence on her. Finally, various critical approaches, the growth of interest in both the writer and her work, and possible reasons for it will be noted.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

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2270

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1919

At a meeting of the Council of the Royal Borough of Kensington on October 21st, 1919, COLONEL A. W. FENTON‐LANGMAN, Chairman of the Public Health Committee of the Council…

Abstract

At a meeting of the Council of the Royal Borough of Kensington on October 21st, 1919, COLONEL A. W. FENTON‐LANGMAN, Chairman of the Public Health Committee of the Council brought up a Report as follows :

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 21 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Thibault Le Texier

The aim of this paper is to seek to reveal the familial roots of modern management thought, largely overlooked by a vast majority of management historians.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to seek to reveal the familial roots of modern management thought, largely overlooked by a vast majority of management historians.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a hermeneutic approach, the early uses of the word “management” are analyzed, as well as the different literature where it is the most frequently employed.

Findings

“Management” does not mean primarily “business management.” Rather, the first meanings of this word refer to the family realm. As such, the development of early management thought is not a matter of technical or scientific innovation, nor is it a matter of institutional size or profit. For a long time, management practices have concerned things more than people. In the twentieth century, the principle of control comes to supersede the principles of care and self‐government.

Research limitations/implications

The paper's findings call for another history of management thought, as against the too narrow histories of modern business management and the too inclusive histories of management as an ancestral and universal practice.

Practical implications

This research sheds light on two forgotten roots of management thought: the principles of care and of self‐government, which management practitioners could bring up‐to‐date. By presenting the family as the first locus of true “management” thought, it is an invitation to draw from domestic ways of governing.

Originality/value

The historical material here analyzed remains largely unknown to management historians. The method, focusing on text analysis rather than on the study of practices, remains rare in the field of management history.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2015

Titilayo Abiona, Joseph Balogun, Adedeji Adefuye and Ivonne Anguh

– The purpose of this paper is to explore HIV risk behaviors of inmates during incarceration and gain an in-depth understanding of the context within which these behaviors occur.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore HIV risk behaviors of inmates during incarceration and gain an in-depth understanding of the context within which these behaviors occur.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 47 recently released ex-offenders participated in focus group discussions that explored the contexts surrounding inmate engagement in HIV risk behaviors in prison. Data were analyzed using NVivo 7 and results were organized into themes.

Findings

Inmates engaged behaviors that could predispose them to HIV infection. These behaviors include unprotected sexual intercourse, transactional sex, injection drug use, tattooing, and body piercing. The results of this study show that the contexts within which risk behaviors occur among inmates are complex, involving inmates, corrections staff, and visitors. The reasons why inmates engage in risk behaviors are also myriad: finance; addiction; boredom; deprivation; prison culture; slack security and monitoring; indifference by correctional officers; and violence.

Practical implications

Prevention of risk behaviors and ultimately HIV transmission in prison requires a multi-dimensional ecological approach that focusses on the inmates, prison staff, prison system, policies, and policy makers.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to explore HIV risk behaviors of prison inmates. It is of value to health professionals, security agents, administrators, and non-governmental organizations that work with the incarcerated population.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

R.P. Sundarraj and Thanh Vuong

Mobile devices are generally designed for use in low‐bandwidth environments and therefore have limited ability to handle e‐mail attachments. As such, these devices often…

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1552

Abstract

Mobile devices are generally designed for use in low‐bandwidth environments and therefore have limited ability to handle e‐mail attachments. As such, these devices often have to be complemented by using a type of electronic agents, known as attachment handling agents (AHAs), which convert the contents of the attachments to a bandwidth‐conserving text‐form that is then sent to the mobile device for viewing. The purpose of this study is to assess whether AHA usage would improve an individual employee’s perceived work‐performance, measured by a multidimensional set of factors. The participants in the survey are employees at an F1000 Canadian company, all of whom have adopted a mobile communication device. Results indicate that AHA usage has a positive impact on productivity and customer satisfaction.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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