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1 – 10 of 359
Article
Publication date: 15 January 2019

Elizabeth Shepherd, Jenny Bunn, Andrew Flinn, Elizabeth Lomas, Anna Sexton, Sara Brimble, Katherine Chorley, Emma Harrison, James Lowry and Jessica Page

Open government data and access to public sector information is commonplace, yet little attention has focussed on the essential roles and responsibilities in practice of the…

3297

Abstract

Purpose

Open government data and access to public sector information is commonplace, yet little attention has focussed on the essential roles and responsibilities in practice of the information and records management professionals, who enable public authorities to deliver open data to citizens. This paper aims to consider the perspectives of open government and information practitioners in England on the procedural and policy implications of open data across local public authorities.

Design/methodology/approach

Using four case studies from different parts of the public sector in England (local government, higher education, National Health Service and hospital trust), the research involved master’s level students in the data collection and analysis, alongside academics, thus enhancing the learning experience of students.

Findings

There was little consistency in the location of responsibility for open government data policy, the range of job roles involved or the organisational structures, policy and guidance in place to deliver this function. While this may reflect the organisational differences and professional concerns, it makes it difficult to share best practice. Central government policy encourages public bodies to make their data available for re-use. However, local practice is very variable and perhaps understandably responds more to local organisational strategic and resource priorities. The research found a lack of common metadata standards for open data, different choices about which data to open, problems of data redundancy, inconsistency and data integrity and a wide variety of views on the corporate and public benefits of open data.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to England and to non-national public bodies and only draws data from a small number of case studies.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the debate about emerging issues around the complexities of open government data and its public benefits, contributing to the discussions around technology-enabled approaches to citizen engagement and governance. It offers new insights into the interaction between open data and public policy objectives, drawing on the experience of local public sectors in England.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 29 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2019

Elizabeth Shepherd, Anna Sexton, Oliver Duke-Williams and Alexandra Eveleigh

Government administrative data have enormous potential for public and individual benefit through improved educational and health services to citizens, medical research…

Abstract

Purpose

Government administrative data have enormous potential for public and individual benefit through improved educational and health services to citizens, medical research, environmental and climate interventions and better use of scarce energy resources. The purpose of this study (part of the Administrative Data Research Centre in England, ADRC-E) was to examine perspectives about the sharing, linking and re-use (secondary use) of government administrative data. This study seeks to establish an analytical understanding of risk with regard to administrative data.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study focused on the secondary use of government administrative data by academic researchers. Data collection was through 44 semi-structured interviews plus one focus group, and was supported by documentary analysis and a literature review. The study draws on the views of expert data researchers, data providers, regulatory bodies, research funders, lobby groups, information practitioners and data subjects.

Findings

This study discusses the identification and management of risk in the use of government administrative data and presents a risk framework.

Practical implications

This study will have resonance with records managers, risk managers, data specialists, information policy and compliance managers, citizens groups that engage with data, as well as all those responsible for the creation and management of government administrative data.

Originality/value

First, this study identifies and categorizes the risks arising from the research use of government administrative data, based on policy, practice and experience of those involved. Second, it identifies mitigating risk management activities, linked to five key stakeholder communities, and it discusses the locus of responsibility for risk management actions. The conclusion presents the elements of a new risk framework to inform future actions by the government data community and enable researchers to exploit the power of administrative data for public good.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Julie McLeod

398

Abstract

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

James Whitman

One of the key issues that affects practitioners is the question of selection and the relationship this bears to records content and an evaluation of the long term value of…

2479

Abstract

One of the key issues that affects practitioners is the question of selection and the relationship this bears to records content and an evaluation of the long term value of collections of records. Appraisal has been the means developed by records management and archives to deal with this problem. In this respect, the aim of this paper has been to describe those theories of appraisal that are currently most influential in highlighting the choices and pathways that each present to those actively engaged in research, or in designing recordkeeping systems to manage research records. The conclusion is that the claims to singularity and independence that these perspectives represent will not be maintained during the course of dealing with the complex contingencies encountered when managing real recordkeeping systems. The alternative is to evaluate the strengths and difficulties that each represents and on this basis, develop appraisal strategies that most effectively meet the requirements of the wide range of interests likely to be involved.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Elizabeth Shepherd

The theme of the 1990s is partnership. Government policies and organisational structures encourage collaboration. This trend is reflected in the archives and records management…

2105

Abstract

The theme of the 1990s is partnership. Government policies and organisational structures encourage collaboration. This trend is reflected in the archives and records management profession. This paper is a study of partnership projects between higher education institutions and four types of partner: employers; professional bodies; a charity; and other higher education institutions. The focus of the study is professional education and training in archives and records management. The paper concludes that a complex environment requires a flexible response and that a small discipline needs to develop partnerships to enable all involved to respond swiftly to change. Collaboration rather than competition must be the basis for future survival and success.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

ELIZABETH SHEPHERD

This article examines the HEFCE‐CVE funded project undertaken at the School of Library, Archive and Information Studies, University College London to investigate distance…

Abstract

This article examines the HEFCE‐CVE funded project undertaken at the School of Library, Archive and Information Studies, University College London to investigate distance education as a mechanism for delivering continuing professional development in the field of archives and records management. The first part of the project focused on determining the training and educational needs of the sector in the UK, by means of a survey of members of the profession. The results of this survey form the main part of this article, but other conclusions of the project to date are also reported.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

ELIZABETH SHEPHERD

This paper aims to examine some of the issues associated with managing electronic records, identify some problems, and suggest some solutions, from the perspective of a…

3112

Abstract

This paper aims to examine some of the issues associated with managing electronic records, identify some problems, and suggest some solutions, from the perspective of a professional records manager and archivist. Three main issues are considered that need to be addressed by managers of electronic records — management and organisational, technical and legal. The overarching theme of standards is woven into these three main areas of concern. The paper concludes by highlighting the need for attention to be paid, in the UK, to discussing and framing a professional approach to electronic records management.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Judy Scott

On the last page of the White Paper A New Contract for Welfare ‐ Support for the Disabled, the Rt Hon Alistair Darling MP, Secretary of State for Social Security, states: ‘We are…

Abstract

On the last page of the White Paper A New Contract for Welfare ‐ Support for the Disabled, the Rt Hon Alistair Darling MP, Secretary of State for Social Security, states: ‘We are increasing the therapeutic earnings limit in Incapacity Benefit to ensure that people with a long‐term illness or disability who undertake therapeutic work can benefit from higher wage rates.’The week before the paper was published, a letter requesting exactly this change was sent to Alistair Darling signed by service user groups and representatives of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, Mind, the National Schizophrenia Fellowship, the Manic Depression Fellowship, ITON Ireland, the Richmond Fellowship, Birmingham and City Universities, the Centre for Mental Health Services Development at King's College, London, Professor Geoff Shepherd, Jack Ashley, Elizabeth Bray and me.Who says no‐one ever listens!

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Elizabeth Shepherd, Alice Stevenson and Andrew Flinn

University College London (UCL) ran a research project over 12 months in 2008‐2009, funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, which examined what the impact of the UK

4160

Abstract

Purpose

University College London (UCL) ran a research project over 12 months in 2008‐2009, funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, which examined what the impact of the UK Freedom of Information (FOI) Act 2000 had been on records management services in local government. This paper aims to report on some of the findings of the study, with a focus on the practical records management issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The research considered the three perspectives of records managers: institutional FOI; policy managers; and FOI requestors and user communities. Following an extensive literature review, qualitative research methods were used to gather data, specifically semi‐structured interviewing of 27 individuals from 19 different institutions in London and the South East of England and with 11 requestors.

Findings

The findings reported in this paper focus on records services in local government, in particular their organisational location and status, and aspects of the management of current and non‐current records, including those in digital formats.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is one of the outputs of a grant‐funded project, which documents the results of research in FOI from a records management perspective and makes a contribution to the wider debate about access to information. It attempts to survey user responses, which has been an overlooked aspect of other FOI and records management research.

Practical implications

There are some implications for good practice in records management policy and systems and in the location of records functions in local government.

Originality/value

Local government is an under‐researched field in respect of information management and FOI, when compared with other parts of the public sector, and this is therefore a significant contribution to knowledge in this field.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Elizabeth Shepherd

The purpose of this article is to examine the historical development of archives and records management education in universities in England and review the state of research and…

2393

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the historical development of archives and records management education in universities in England and review the state of research and teaching in the discipline in 2005.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a framework that draws on sociological attributes, the main text provides a historical analysis derived from primary and secondary sources, together with a brief overview of current educational provision for the discipline.

Findings

The article finds that graduate education in archives and records management has developed in the UK over a period of 60 years (1947‐2005) and is well established, with seven Master's‐level programmes offered across England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland, in a variety of learning modes (full‐ and part‐time, open learning, face‐to‐face) and from different perspectives and contexts (history, information science, digital preservation). The university research community in the discipline has developed more recently and needs to progress quickly and soundly to support the future intellectual life of the profession.

Research limitations/implications

The geographical scope is limited to the UK and focuses in particular on England.

Practical implications

The paper identifies some gaps in educational provision, for instance mid‐career cross‐domain research opportunities, and an apparent lack of interest in academic research by UK practitioners, which might be further investigated.

Originality/value

No study of the historical development of the academic discipline of archives and records management has previously been published.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 58 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 359