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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Miriam L. Matteson, Elizabeth Schlueter and Morgan Hidy

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current state of continuing education in management for librarians.

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3363

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current state of continuing education in management for librarians.

Design/methodology/approach

Directors from public and academic libraries were surveyed to explore their perceptions of the need for and value of management knowledge in librarians.

Findings

The results show that library directors consider a wide range of management areas important for librarians to possess and believe that having above average management knowledge is a significant factor in hiring and promotion decisions. Respondents perceive that applicants for mid to senior positions in libraries are more likely to have average or low levels of management knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations to the study are the small sample and the exclusive focus on library directors. Future research on the need for and value of management knowledge for librarians should also examine the perceptions of early to mid career librarians and should explore associations between employees' levels of management knowledge and promotion and hiring decisions.

Practical implications

Results suggest that librarians who wish to move up professionally would benefit from pursuing continuing education in management. Libraries should look for ways to offer management training to staff through collaborations with other libraries and community organizations. Library and information science education programs should offer strategically designed continuing education in specific areas of management.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates a gap in the field of librarianship in the development of highly knowledgeable, trained managers, and offers some solutions to librarians, library institutions, and schools of library and information science toward closing that gap.

Details

Library Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Jeffrey Berman

Abstract

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Mad Muse: The Mental Illness Memoir in a Writer's Life and Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-810-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

William Baker

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77

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Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

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2577

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Miriam Louise Matteson, Susan Musser and Elizabeth Allen

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of librarians toward continuing education (CE) in library management.

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1793

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of librarians toward continuing education (CE) in library management.

Design/methodology/approach

The study followed survey design to collect perceptions of librarians from around the USA. In total, 166 usable surveys were returned and the bulk of the analysis examined responses from non-directors (n=96).

Findings

Non-director librarians identified knowledge areas important for success as a manager including human resources, leadership, and organizational behavior. The majority of respondents assessed their own level of management knowledge as average to above average. In all, 38 percent of respondents indicated their management knowledge came from workshops, webinars, and conferences. Respondents reported that the opportunity for a salary increase, as well as a personal desire to learn were motivators for seeking CE in management.

Practical implications

A CE program in management should extend the knowledge learned in the MLIS degree, address knowledge, skills, and individual development, be flexibly scheduled and reasonably priced, and offer clear benefits to the library and to the learner.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates the importance of building a CE program in management that compliments other educational offerings in order to help librarians develop the knowledge and skills needed to lead libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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