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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Akila Sarirete, Azeddine Chikh and Elizabeth Noble

The purpose of this paper is to define a community memory for a virtual communities of practice (CoP) based on organizational learning (OL) concept and ontologies.

1063

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define a community memory for a virtual communities of practice (CoP) based on organizational learning (OL) concept and ontologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on applying the OL concept to virtual CoP and proposes a framework for building the CoP memory by identifying several layers of ontologies such as generic, knowledge, domain, and task ontologies. A CoP of e‐learning is used as an example of semantic learning organization and as an application for the proposed framework.

Findings

Applying the proposed framework on the CoP of e‐learning and more specifically in the instructional engineering domain shows that community knowledge can be reified and shared among the members. This framework can be used as a backbone for other CoP in other fields.

Originality/value

This present work proposed a general framework for the CoP memory using a knowledge engineering approach and proposing different forms of ontologies as a backbone for the memory. It also suggests that the knowledge capitalization is important as well as the contextual element.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Sara Cervai and Tauno Kekale

272

Abstract

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of organizational memory to a community of practice, and consider the tools available to an e‐community engaged in the…

877

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of organizational memory to a community of practice, and consider the tools available to an e‐community engaged in the creation of online learning systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explains how knowledge, task and domain ontologies can be combined to provide a structure that communities of practice can use to share both tacit and explicit knowledge.

Findings

If you look up “ontology” in Wikipedia, it says that “in information science, an ontology formally represents knowledge as a set of concepts within a domain, and the relationships between those concepts”. Having knowledge set in context in a usable, accessible form – knowledge capitalization – is a key source of value creation for organizations. One of the main reasons for trying to make organizational knowledge explicit – particularly tacit knowledge – is to allow the organization to see what it does not know and where the gaps are. Ontologies can provide the technological backbone and help create a “semantic learning organization”.

Practical implications

The paper discusses the application of this approach to a community of practice of e‐learning engaged in instructional engineering. It shows how this facilitates the development of a semantic learning organization. It also highlights the focus on generative or “double‐loop” learning in communities of practice.

Originality/value

The paper shows how the concept of organizational memory and the tools of knowledge management can be applied in virtual communities.

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Robert Norris

Historical research suggests that English monarchs at the start of the early modern era (ca. 1500‐1800) followed a communication model this paper tentatively names…

1078

Abstract

Historical research suggests that English monarchs at the start of the early modern era (ca. 1500‐1800) followed a communication model this paper tentatively names “instructional”, characterised by one‐way communication intended to instruct the public in a correct worldview and to coach proper behaviour. There is evidence that this instructional model segued into recognisably modern models as the English Crown lost power between the reigns of Elizabeth I and George III, suggesting a link between the sender’s power and the communication techniques the sender employed.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1979

Gerry Fowler

The General Election is over, with the predicted result. Margaret Thatcher is in Downing Street/and Mark Carlisle (and Rhodes Boyson, from whom may the good Lord preserve…

Abstract

The General Election is over, with the predicted result. Margaret Thatcher is in Downing Street/and Mark Carlisle (and Rhodes Boyson, from whom may the good Lord preserve us) in Elizabeth House. With them is Janet, the Baroness Young, as Minister of State; as far as I know her principal educational qualification, apart from her own degree, is to have been born the daughter of the Bursar of Jesus College, Oxford. Perhaps that is symbolic: the present Government shows every sign of being strong on finance — in the sense of cutting it — and weak on the content of education. Meanwhile Shirley Williams has departed from the scene, as have Margaret Jackson, Bryan Davies (a former FE teacher), Mike Noble (once chairman of Burnley LEA), and myself. We shall dispense with expertise: prejudices to the fore¡

Details

Education + Training, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Stephanie Geiger-Oneto and Elizabeth A. Minton

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of religion, morality and mindset in influencing perceptions of luxury products.

1680

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of religion, morality and mindset in influencing perceptions of luxury products.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses three experimental studies to investigate this relationship.

Findings

Study 1 shows that religiosity influences negative moral emotions (but not positive moral emotions), which then negatively influence luxury consumption and morality evaluations. Study 2 replicates the effects of Study 1 and shows that priming a moral (marketplace) mindset decreases negative moral emotions and increases luxury consumption evaluations for highly (less) religious consumers. Study 3 explains the effects found in Studies 1 and 2 as driven by moral licensing, such that priming a moral (marketplace) mindset decreases (increases) the negative moral emotions experienced by those primed (not primed) with religiosity. Study 3 also improves the external validity of findings by including a social media sample of regular luxury purchases. Implications for theory and marketing practice are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The present research is limited by samples conducted in Western culture with a predominantly Western, Christian religious audience. Future research should examine how moral vs marketplace mindsets differentially influence the consumption of luxury products for Eastern religious consumers (e.g. Hindus, Buddhists and Confucianists). Additionally, this research was conducted using Allport and Ross’ (1967) religiosity measure. Some could argue that the measure is not the most representative for atheists or agnostics or is outdated, so further research would benefit from replicating and extending the findings in this paper with other, newer religiosity measures better adapted to measure all belief systems.

Practical implications

Marketers of luxury products should realize the potential of a new target audience – religious consumers. While religiosity is positively correlated with negative moral emotions toward luxury products in Study 1, Studies 2 and 3 reveal that priming a moral mindset can reduce negative affect and increase evaluations of luxury products. Thus, marketers could seek out ways to emphasize morality in messaging. For example, a marketer may incorporate words such as virtues, ethics and/or noble, when describing attributes of their brand in advertising, thereby resulting in a moral licensing effect. Research suggests advertising content has the potential to influence consumers’ perceived moral obligation, inclusive of the moral or immoral nature of the consumption of luxury brands.

Originality/value

While the link between religion and luxury goods is evident in popular culture, previous research has yet to empirically explore this relationship. This study fills this gap by investigating the role of religiosity on the perceived morality and ultimately the purchase of luxury branded goods.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Helen Duh and Miemie Struwig

The purpose of this paper is to look at the successful generational cohort segmentation from global and country-specific formative experiences in the USA, to examine the…

1630

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at the successful generational cohort segmentation from global and country-specific formative experiences in the USA, to examine the justification of cohort segmentation in South Africa. It also describes the demographic and psychographic characteristics of the latest consumer cohort – Generation Y for the interest of retailers and marketing managers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study gathers secondary data by carefully scrutinizing books, journal articles, essays and dissertations. From these secondary sources, summaries of various findings and important scholarly insights into the qualifying factors for cohort formation and the important characteristics that make Generation Y an attractive consumer segment are provided.

Findings

Findings show that, generational cohort segmentation is reserved for countries whose defining moments meet some qualifying conditions. South Africa can segment consumers in terms of generational cohorts because the historic and political defining events the country experienced fulfil the requirements for cohort formation. Particularly, apartheid is suggested to be the country-specific defining event backing the labelling of Generation X and Y South Africans. Generation X should thus be “the apartheid, socio-economic instability cohort” and Generation Y should be “the post apartheid socio-economically liberated cohort” Findings also show that Generation Y South Africans constitute a majority of the growing middle class, termed “Black Diamonds”.

Originality/value

In addition to providing summaries of useful marketing-related reasons to target Generation Y consumers, this study assesses the qualification of South Africa’s historic and political events in forming consumer cohorts for generational marketing.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Jing Zheng, Chuan‐You Deng, Shao‐Min Cheng, Wen‐Ya Liu and A‐Tao Wang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the great contributions made by the American library expert, Mary Elizabeth Wood, to Chinese library development.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the great contributions made by the American library expert, Mary Elizabeth Wood, to Chinese library development.

Design/methodology/approach

As a pioneer of the modern library movement Mary Elizabeth Wood devoted herself to a Chinese library career. It was structured according to the following theme: setting up the Boone Library and introducing the modern American public library into China; establishing Boone Library School and initiating Chinese library science education; raising money and appealing for China's library development; helping forward the foundation of the Library Association of China; as well as promoting Chinese library intercommunion and cooperation with the West.

Findings

With the background of underdeveloped Chinese librarianship, Mary Elizabeth Wood introduced modern American public library spirit into China, opened the gate of Chinese library science, and promoted Chinese library science.

Research limitations/implications

The paper discusses the library history of China and the role of an American librarian in Chinese library history; thus, it should be of wide interest to researchers involved in library history.

Originality/value

Mary Elizabeth Wood devoted herself to a Chinese library career, and promoted Chinese library science greatly, but research on her is limited. This paper considers her contribution to Chinese library science.

Details

Library Review, vol. 59 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2019

Robert Perinbanayagam

Michael Holquist (1990), one of the commentators on Mikhail Bakhtin’s monumental work, stated flatly that “human existence is dialogue,” and Ivana Markova (2003) declared…

Abstract

Michael Holquist (1990), one of the commentators on Mikhail Bakhtin’s monumental work, stated flatly that “human existence is dialogue,” and Ivana Markova (2003) declared that “dialogism is the ontology of humanity.” Bakhtin (1985;1986) himself said that such dialogues are conducted by using “speech genres.” From another angle Kenneth Burke asked, “What is involved when we say what people are doing and why they are doing it?” and claimed – and showed – that this question can be best answered by using what he called the “grammar of motives,” which consisted of a hexad of terms: act, attitude, scene, agent, agency, and purpose. In this chapter, I examine, by using various examples, how the Burkean grammar is used in the construction of one speech genre or the other to achieve rhetorically effective dialogic communication.

Details

The Interaction Order
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-546-7

Keywords

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