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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2017

Rosemary Fisher, Elizabeth Merlot and Lester W. Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of entrepreneurial passion and in doing so explores the relationship between harmonious and obsessive passion (OP) and…

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1513

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of entrepreneurial passion and in doing so explores the relationship between harmonious and obsessive passion (OP) and resilience. A pathway between passion and entrepreneurial success (ES) that is mediated by sustained entrepreneurial commitment (SEC) and resilience is tested.

Design/methodology/approach

An online questionnaire survey was completed by (n=215) Australian entrepreneurs. Results were based on structural equation modelling analysis.

Findings

Harmonious passion contributes directly and indirectly to perceptions of ES through resilience; OP contributes to SEC which contributes to success through resilience.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations stem from the survey methodology used. Implications for incorporating harmonious and OP into training to ensure well developed entrepreneurs are raised.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few studies to test the theoretical constructs of passion and resilience in the entrepreneurship context, and seemingly the first to do so on an Australian sample of entrepreneurs. This research finds that both types of passion are important to individual level resilience and ultimately to ES. An OP for one’s venture is an important contributor to persisting with the venture.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Elizabeth Clarke

High order leadership, problem solving skills, and the capacity for innovation in new markets, and technologically complex and multidimensional contexts, are the new set…

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2668

Abstract

Purpose

High order leadership, problem solving skills, and the capacity for innovation in new markets, and technologically complex and multidimensional contexts, are the new set of skills that are most valued by companies and employers alike. Business simulation exercises are one way of enhancing these skills. This article aims to examine the capacity of business simulations to deliver the learning outcomes they have the potential to achieve, and the challenges faced in implementing these technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature of the learning outcomes from business simulations, and critical assessment of the challenges and problems involved in the implementation of learning technologies.

Findings

Traditionally, postgraduate business education programs have adopted the functional silos that provide the organizational framework for the design of the curriculum. Business problems rarely present themselves in the compartmentalized silo supply‐driven disciplinary framework. The question of how to achieve greater convergence of the business curriculum programs that offer students more practical oriented experiences to develop their conceptual understanding in cross functional decision making and analytical thinking abilities through “learning by doing” of real business problems, has concerned business education for a considerable time.

Originality/value

The article shows that the prospect of adopting a broad‐based, integrative approach that goes beyond the conventional lectures and case studies complemented by business simulations and emerging technologies has significant potential to resolve the traditional problems of business education convergence of the curriculum.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Christina Riehman-Murphy, Victoria Raish, Emily Mross, Andrea Pritt and Elizabeth Nelson

This paper aims to describe a case study of the open and affordable educational resources (OAER) initiatives led by Penn State University Libraries (UL) and implemented at…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a case study of the open and affordable educational resources (OAER) initiatives led by Penn State University Libraries (UL) and implemented at its many campuses which are designed to address the challenges students experience accessing and funding their course materials.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study will show how a broad administrative mandate for high-level OAER initiatives created the environment for Penn State (PSU) to evolve from individual pioneering units into coordinated university-wide initiatives. This shift, spearheaded by administration with strong UL involvement, allowed for customized and targeted initiatives at its many campuses. By using UL’s centralized, but geographically dispersed, structure, library faculty and staff have been supported in their efforts to expand OAER from the ground up to meet individual contexts and campus needs.

Findings

As a result of its many open and affordable initiatives, PSUL has been able to demonstrate both savings and increased access for students across PSU’s many campuses and World Campus. Broad administrative support has created an environment which enabled UL faculty and staff to lead various initiatives.

Originality/value

UL has long been a leader and partner in open and affordability initiatives at PSU because of its core mission of providing access. By sharing the processes and logistics of how a large research institution with many campuses of various sizes implemented a wide variety of library-driven open and affordability initiatives through a centralized but geographically dispersed structure, academic libraries will be able to replicate similar initiatives in their unique contexts.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Elizabeth Thach and Steven Cuellar

Spanish wine sales have grown quite rapidly in the US market during the past few years. The purpose of this paper is to examine this trend, discuss potential reasons, and…

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1121

Abstract

Purpose

Spanish wine sales have grown quite rapidly in the US market during the past few years. The purpose of this paper is to examine this trend, discuss potential reasons, and identify opportunities for maintaining and increasing Spanish wine sales in the US market.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives are achieved by analyzing ACNielsen scan data from 2002 to 2005 and other secondary data on US wine consumers and trends.

Findings

The results indicate that Americans perceive red Spanish wine quite positively and are moving up in price point expenditures. However, sales of Spanish white wines remain rather fixed at specific price points. In addition, Spanish wine is losing market share to other imported wines, except for certain price points, but is performing well against US wines.

Practical implications

This paper suggests ten opportunities for maintaining and/or increasing Spanish wine sales in the US market. Many of these suggestions are also useful for other countries desiring to export wine to the US.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first of its kind to provide an in‐depth analysis of ACNielsen Scan data on Spanish wines sales in the USA. In addition, it provides extensive information on the US wine market, trends, and new market segments such as the Millennial and Hispanic markets.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Claire Loh, David H Wong, Ali Quazi and Russel Philip Kingshott

Australian tertiary institutions are increasingly incorporating technologies, such as social media and Web 2.0 tools into teaching in response to changing student needs…

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1781

Abstract

Purpose

Australian tertiary institutions are increasingly incorporating technologies, such as social media and Web 2.0 tools into teaching in response to changing student needs. The purpose of this paper is to revisit a fundamental question, frequently asked in marketing, “what do our ‘customers’ [students] think now?” This will help determine the effectiveness of application of these technologies in courses and teaching programs in a changing competitive educational environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed method approach, data were collected through 31 qualitative interviews and a survey of 231 university marketing students. Quantitative techniques included summary statistics, factor analysis and t-test.

Findings

Results indicate while students’ perceived flexibility and better learning outcomes as positive aspects of e-learning, they have concerns about flexibility for self-paced learning, self-motivational issues, lack of human interaction and fostering teamwork.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to one Australian university operating in domestic and international markets. However, the study needs to be replicated for better generalizability across the sector.

Practical implications

The findings question the effectiveness of e-learning as an alternative approach to face-to-face learning pedagogy. However, regular review of current e-learning tools is needed to help match student and tertiary institution expectations.

Originality/value

This study re-investigates students’ perception in relation to the benefits that e-learning is expected to yield. It is one of the few studies questioning whether these promised benefits are valued by the tertiary student fraternity.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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