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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Anne Dickinson and Elizabeth M. Ineson

Examines the use of two selection techniques, i.e. biodata andpersonality assessment, which have been found to have high predictivevalidities when used in other…

Abstract

Examines the use of two selection techniques, i.e. biodata and personality assessment, which have been found to have high predictive validities when used in other industries, in the context of hotel employee recruitment. In the first phase of a pilot study, Saville and Holdsworth′s Customer Service Questionnaire (CSQ) was used together with a questionnaire designed specifically to collect biodata (biographical information). The research was carried out at a four‐star hotel in central Manchester, with the aim of identifying any characteristics which were common to those hotel operatives who frequently interacted with guests, who were reliable and who produced a high standard of work consistently, so that a specific selection tool which isolated these characteristics might be developed.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Elizabeth M. Ineson, Djordje Čomić and Lazar Kalmić

This paper aims to examine, discuss and intertwine theory and practice related to hotel guests’ home and lodging environments to identify their in-room psychological and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine, discuss and intertwine theory and practice related to hotel guests’ home and lodging environments to identify their in-room psychological and physical needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design is qualitative, with a focus on understanding social phenomena through direct observation, communication and textual analysis; contextual subjective accuracy is stressed over generality. Using interpretative phenomenology, the psychological and sociological aspects of the individual’s journey are deliberated including: travelling through one’s own room; virtual travels from the room via electronic media; the hotel room as a reconstruction of the intimate sphere; the return to, and transformation of, one’s own room; and the accumulation of souvenirs. The tabulated findings are linked to hotel guests’ in-room needs using inductive thematic coding and content analysis.

Findings

The psychological and physical in-room needs of individual hotel guests are identified; safety, security and control emerge as paramount. Practical suggestions to complement, expand and enrich guests’ in-room experiences are offered.

Research limitations/implications

As the focus is limited predominantly to the debate and rationalisation of concepts and the methodology is exploratory as opposed to scientific, the validity of the findings may be questioned; primary data triangulation modifies this criticism. Future researchers are advised to consider the evidence when developing hypotheses to establish a theory of lodging. Research on improving the quality of facilities and services should centre on an analysis of the concept of “being in one’s own room”, followed by an analysis of the transposition to “being in a hotel room” from both physiological and psychological perspectives.

Practical implications

Referring to the developed hierarchy, accommodation/lodging providers are recommended to increase their efforts to exceed the expectations of individual guests. Guest profiling should focus on individual needs and preferences, ideally at the booking stage.

Social implications

Accommodation/lodging providers are encouraged to demonstrate social awareness and empathy through individual social responsibility efforts to enhance the experiences and quality of life of their guests.

Originality/value

The paper makes a valuable contribution by debating and connecting philosophical and psychological literature to the practical needs of hotel guests. It recognises and concludes that, as they are merely temporary residents, hotel guests’ experiences embrace a series of journeys through different, individual interiors. Based on this premise, an innovative hierarchy of hotel guests’ in-room needs is developed.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Elizabeth M. Ineson and Simon H.P. Brown

Brings together the main findings of a pilot study which aims toimprove operational front‐of‐house employee selection in a largeinternational company‐owned hotel group…

Abstract

Brings together the main findings of a pilot study which aims to improve operational front‐of‐house employee selection in a large international company‐owned hotel group. The study involves the development and testing of a method for scoring applicants for operational front‐of‐house positions using biodata based on their interpersonal skills and their job flexibility. The data were collected at a medium‐sized city centre hotel in the United Kingdom staffed with 112 employees, 73 of whom participated in the study.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Susan M. Fournier and Elizabeth M. Ineson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictive value of age, gender and work experience in relation to hospitality management (HM) academic success, as measured by…

1497

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictive value of age, gender and work experience in relation to hospitality management (HM) academic success, as measured by year one leadership programme (LP) achievement and cumulative grade point average (CGPA). The association between LP and CGPA success and internship performance is also evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample comprised 349 international undergraduate HM students. Secondary data were compiled and analysed using SPSS. Eight hypotheses, developed from the literature were tested using χ2, t-tests and Kruskal-Wallis tests as appropriate.

Findings

Although age was not a predictor of success, males significantly outperformed females. Pre-programme work experience was not a predictor of LP performance but length of paid work experience and supervisory work experience were linked significantly to mean CGPA. LP achievement was positively associated with CGPA and with successful internship completion.

Research limitations/implications

Although the student sample was international and spanned three cohorts, the data collection was limited to one institution.

Practical implications

Pre-programme work experience, in particular supervisory experience, and the incorporation of management competency-linked LPs into first-year HM curricula are recommended.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the under-researched predictive value of age, gender and pre-programme work experience in relation to HM academic performance, in particular in an LP context. An additional innovative finding is the positive association between LP achievement and success in HM professional practice.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 56 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Elizabeth M. Ineson and Richard F. Kempa

Centres on the selection of undergraduates for hotel and catering management (HCM) courses in the UK. Semi‐structured, face‐to‐face in‐depth interviews (N = 25) were…

1419

Abstract

Centres on the selection of undergraduates for hotel and catering management (HCM) courses in the UK. Semi‐structured, face‐to‐face in‐depth interviews (N = 25) were conducted with HCM tutors in 16 UK institutions to identify the source, nature and ways of measurement of the qualities used to select undergraduates. A synthesis of the evidence allowed a classification into four subgroups, e.g. academic attainment and ability, motivation to study, and commitment to work in, HCM, personal characteristics, and personal circumstances. As expected, the measures of academic attainment together with evidence from the headteachers’ reports, seemed to be key features of the selection process but there appeared to be a mismatch between what some of the admission procedures entailed and what the selectors considered to be important.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Matthew H.T. Yap and Elizabeth M. Ineson

This exploratory study aims to determine Asian hospitality managers' (AHMs') perceptions of HIV education in their workplaces and their knowledge of HIV.

1456

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study aims to determine Asian hospitality managers' (AHMs') perceptions of HIV education in their workplaces and their knowledge of HIV.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed‐methodology research design gathered quantitative data from 32 English‐speaking AHMs, selected using probability and non‐probability sampling techniques, through a postal questionnaire. In addition, 12 of them agreed to participate in follow‐up telephone interviews to further investigate this research topic. Transformed raw data were analysed using both qualitative and quantitative analytical methods.

Findings

AHMs supported HIV education with a strong understanding of the transmission and treatment of HIV. In addition, they revealed an acceptable level of knowledge regarding its effects on individuals and societies. However, their understanding of its nature, extent and general effects was weak. Based on the imperfection of AHMs' HIV knowledge, they appear to be disseminating incorrect information to their peers and subordinates.

Research limitations/implications

The external validity of the study is affected due to its sensitive nature to generate quantitative data based on 32 respondents.

Practical implications

The development and implementation of workplace education and training programmes required immediate consideration to eradicate misunderstandings regarding the acquisition, transmission and development of HIV.

Originality/value

The exploratory study supplemented the sparse literature addressing HIV knowledge of AHMs and the need of HIV education for hospitality employers and employees in their workplaces to curb the spread of HIV.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Anda Papadopoulou, Elizabeth M. Ineson and Derek T. Wilkie

Indentifies the dimensions of a higher customer contact food andbeverage operative′s job as perceived by managers, supervisors andoperatives and examines within‐source and…

1794

Abstract

Indentifies the dimensions of a higher customer contact food and beverage operative′s job as perceived by managers, supervisors and operatives and examines within‐source and between‐source differences in these perceptions. Uses two instruments, the repertory grid and the work profiling system. Shows a number of distinct dimensions which are defined in terms of the worker behaviours necessary for the job tasks to be performed. Managers/supervisors and operatives generally agree on a number of dimensions. Discusses variations occurring both with and between groups and implications for the choice of sources of job analysis data and the use of job analysis in a personnel selection and training context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 7 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1996

Elizabeth M. Ineson

Looks at the selection criteria for vocational courses from the viewpoint of graduate employers. Asks the question: to what extent can the selection criteria for…

1099

Abstract

Looks at the selection criteria for vocational courses from the viewpoint of graduate employers. Asks the question: to what extent can the selection criteria for vocational degree courses reflect those qualities which are sought by subsequent employers of the graduate trainees? Questions graduate trainee recruiters to find out what was actually happening in practice.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Thien T. Truong, Matthew H.T. Yap and Elizabeth M. Ineson

This paper aims to identify and analyse potential Vietnamese consumers' perceptions of organic foods.

3172

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify and analyse potential Vietnamese consumers' perceptions of organic foods.

Design/methodology/approach

A deductive approach of reasoning was employed to address the positivism research philosophy through the survey research strategy. Quantitative data were collected from 264 potential Vietnamese consumers through a self‐administered structured questionnaire and analysed using frequencies, descriptive statistics, chi squared test, principal components analysis, t‐tests and a Kolmogorov‐Smirnov test.

Findings

Potential Vietnamese consumers' willingness to purchase organic foods was linked positively to health and safety whilst the females appreciated their nutritional value. Environmental and sustainability concerns did not influence purchasing decisions. Because of their perceived superior quality, potential Vietnamese consumers were not price sensitive towards organic foods.

Research limitations/implications

This study lacks the qualitative depth and the employment of quota sampling technique to select respondents may impact external validity.

Practical implications

The findings can benefit organic foods sellers and retailers in developing appropriate sales and marketing strategies by differentiating between organic foods and conventional foods to target and attract potential Vietnamese consumers, and to expand the existing organic foods market in Vietnam.

Originality/value

The present paper supplements the knowledge gap by identifying and analysing potential Vietnamese consumers' perceptions of organic foods in order to assist organic foods sellers and retailers to understand potential Vietnamese consumers and expand their organic foods market in Vietnam.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Timothy H. Jung, Elizabeth M. Ineson and Amanda Miller

This paper aims to discuss stakeholders’ understanding of sustainable tourism development and their experiences regarding the contribution of these movements to…

2227

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss stakeholders’ understanding of sustainable tourism development and their experiences regarding the contribution of these movements to sustainable tourism development. The contribution of the Slow Food and Cittaslow Movements to the success of a tourism destination is evaluated by determining local stakeholders’ perceptions of the meaning of these terms and views on their benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach used semi-structured interviews to collect data from 11 purposively sampled local stakeholders. The interview questions spanned knowledge, membership and perceived benefits of the Slow Food and Cittaslow Movements and the contribution of these Movements to sustainable tourism development. The data were analysed using framework analysis.

Findings

Varying levels of familiarity with the Slow Food and Cittaslow Movements were evident. Clear economic and personal benefits from membership were acknowledged. It was confirmed that the Slow Food and Cittaslow Movements have contributed to sustainable tourism development and that public–private partnership is key to its success.

Research limitations/implications

The specific research context and limited purposive sample suggest great caution in any generalisation of the results.

Practical implications

Close and continued involvement of stakeholders plus membership of the Slow Food and Cittaslow Movements can contribute strongly to promoting sustainable tourism development in rural areas.

Social implications

It is recognised that the Slow Food and Cittaslow Movements make a substantial contribution to local economies and add value to sustainable practices.

Originality/value

Involving local stakeholders in public–private partnerships can contribute to the success of rural tourism destinations when the Slow Food and Cittaslow Movements are considered as alternative approaches to sustainable tourism development.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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