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Article

Michael J. Maloni, David M. Gligor, Robin A. Cheramie and Elizabeth M. Boyd

A talent shortage and underrepresentation of women in logistics emphasize the need to assess the logistics work culture. As logistics practitioners face round-the-clock…

Abstract

Purpose

A talent shortage and underrepresentation of women in logistics emphasize the need to assess the logistics work culture. As logistics practitioners face round-the-clock job pressures, work–family conflict presents one such opportunity for study. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of supervisors and mentoring on work interference with family (WIF) and subsequent job satisfaction and intent to leave logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

Under role conflict theory, the authors apply structural equation modeling to survey data of logistics practitioners, focusing on time, strain and behavior WIF sources.

Findings

The results highlight the complexity of WIF in logistics. Strain and behavior-based WIF relate to job satisfaction, which then relates to intent to leave logistics. Family-supportive supervisors reduce time and strain-based WIF, and mentoring provides complementary support for behavior-based WIF. However, mentoring also yields unintended contradictory effects for women as detrimental to time-based WIF.

Research limitations/implications

The relatively small sample size, particularly for women, limits generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

To foster supportive work environments, logistics organizations must train supervisors and mentors to resolve employee WIF, including its different sources and gender-specific impacts.

Originality/value

The interplay of supervisors and mentors has not been well studied to date. Also, the contradictory impacts of mentoring for women based on WIF sources challenges WIF literature and issues warnings for mentoring in professional practice. Finally, the results provide insight into the talent shortage and gender imbalance in logistics that lack empirical study.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article

Michael J. Maloni, Stacy M. Campbell, David M. Gligor, Christina R. Scherrer and Elizabeth M. Boyd

Despite a pervasive workforce shortage, existing research has provided limited guidance about job satisfaction and commitment of the supply chain workforce. Moreover, few…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite a pervasive workforce shortage, existing research has provided limited guidance about job satisfaction and commitment of the supply chain workforce. Moreover, few studies explore the effects of workforce level on such satisfaction and commitment. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

To address this gap, the authors apply person-organization fit theory to study the critical work value drivers of supply chain job satisfaction and industry commitment across workforce levels through structural modeling of practitioner survey data.

Findings

Job satisfaction and industry commitment are impacted differently across workforce levels, particularly for executives, suggesting the potential for conflicts in the workplace and that a “one size fits all” approach for recruitment and retention will be ineffective.

Practical implications

The results reveal how proactive organizations can not only hire and retain the best people but also help employees at different workforce levels understand one another’s motivations, empowering these organizations to become employers of choice.

Originality/value

This study is among the first empirical papers to directly address the labor shortage in supply chain. It also strikes new ground by assessing differences in work values across workforce levels.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article

Maureen P. Boyd, Elizabeth A. Tynan and Lori Potteiger

The purpose of this paper is to deflate some of the pressure-orienting teachers toward following a curricular script.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deflate some of the pressure-orienting teachers toward following a curricular script.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors connect effective classroom teaching and learning practices to a dialogic instructional stance that values local resources and student perspectives and contributions. The authors argue that effective teachers have agency to make decisions about content and pacing adjustments (they call this agentive flow) and that they practice response-able talk. Response-able talk practices are responsive to what is happening in the classroom, responsibly nurture joint purposes and multiple perspectives, and cultivate longer exchanges of student exploratory talk. These talk practices are not easily scripted.

Findings

The authors show what these effective, local and dialogic instructional practices look like in a second-grade urban classroom.

Practical implications

The authors call upon every teacher to robustly find their local ways of working.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors argue that harnessing the local is an essential aspect of dialogic instruction and a critical component of a dialogic instructional stance.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article

Elizabeth Semeraro and Neil M. Boyd

Administrators in higher-education settings routinely create planning documents that help steer the organization in mission-centric ways. In the area of sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

Administrators in higher-education settings routinely create planning documents that help steer the organization in mission-centric ways. In the area of sustainability planning, strategic plans, sustainability plans and climate action plans are the most common methods used. The purpose of this study is to evaluate if specific forms of planning predict sustainability outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This question was evaluated via an empirical archival study of the AASHE STARS database in relation to planning, administration and governance credits and criteria to determine if specific forms of planning were predictive of sustainability implementation outcomes in the categories of Education and Research, Operations, Diversity and Affordability, Human Resources, Investment, Public Engagement and Innovation.

Findings

Findings support the notion that climate action plans were most predictive of achieving sustainability outcomes, and strategic plans were best able to predict educational outcomes.

Practical implications

These findings have important implications for the design and execution of sustainability planning processes in higher-education institutions.

Originality/value

The academic literature contains relatively few empirical studies that demonstrate the capacity of planning on the realization of sustainability outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

Abstract

Details

Authenticity & Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-817-6

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Article

Elizabeth M. Fitzgerald

This exploratory paper identifies variables for investigating competitive skill development; variables that help to shape a firm's entrepreneurship, and the privatization…

Abstract

This exploratory paper identifies variables for investigating competitive skill development; variables that help to shape a firm's entrepreneurship, and the privatization process in Central and Eastern Europe. The paper is organized as follows: The topics of entrepreneurship, privatization, and competitive skills are briefly introduced and grounded in the literature. A methodology section is then provided which includes a proposed firm‐level survey design, propositions, and survey questions. The last section discusses implications for future research.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Book part

Astrid Van den Bossche

Cognitive literary criticism is introduced as a bridge between cognitive approaches to the study of persuasion, and literary traditions in consumer research. As a…

Abstract

Purpose

Cognitive literary criticism is introduced as a bridge between cognitive approaches to the study of persuasion, and literary traditions in consumer research. As a successor to reader-response theory, cognitive literary theory focuses on the cognitive processes of interpretation, while keeping an eye on the aesthetic properties of the text. Paradigmatically cautious researchers might shy away from attempts to marry positivist cognitive constructs to interpretivist cultural theory, but this chapter argues that these qualms also conceal missed opportunities for the study of persuasion.

Methodology/approach

Insights from cognitive literary criticism are demonstrated at the hand of a LEGO ad.

Findings

Theory of mind and conceptual blending are crucial cognitive skills involved in the interpretation of persuasive texts.

Originality/value

Most research to date has kept literary and cognitive approaches to persuasion separate, black-boxing the processes of persuasion. This chapter argues for a revitalization of interest in aesthetic detail, informed by insights from cognitive science.

Details

Qualitative Consumer Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-491-0

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Article

Natalie Elizabeth Boulton, Jonathan Williams and Robert S.P. Jones

There is limited evidence regarding clinical effectiveness of therapeutic interventions for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Previous research has highlighted…

Abstract

Purpose

There is limited evidence regarding clinical effectiveness of therapeutic interventions for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Previous research has highlighted challenges regarding adaptation of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for people with ID. Central to ACT is a focus on living in congruence with individual core values. The concept of values is abstract and difficult for people with a limited verbal understanding to comprehend, and yet this approach holds much promise for people with ID. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study outlines the adaptations undertaken to facilitate making the concept of values more accessible to people with ID. It also explores the feasibility of the adapted approach to the values component.

Findings

This trial has shown that it is possible to isolate a single component of ACT and adapt it for use with people with ID. The findings highlight the potential feasibility of a value-based approach for people with ID augmented through the use of participant-produced photography to enhance conceptual understanding of the values component of ACT.

Research limitations/implications

Findings were reliant on self-report data, which may result in inaccurate reporting and may be influenced by social demands. Given the diverse and unique presentations of people with ID, the inclusion and exclusion criteria limits the extent to which the current findings may be generalised to people with ID more widely.

Practical implications

Participant-produced photography may be directly applied to clinical practice, with implied benefits of improving access to, and meaningful engagement with psychological therapies for people with ID. Development of (and ability to articulate) a readily available and easily accessible values system, during times of adversity, represents a key implication arising from the current trial.

Originality/value

The current study shows that people with intellectual disability can be helped to appreciate abstract concepts such as personal core values. It also shows the potential to work through the medium of personal photography to explore the feasibility of the adapted approach to the values component – potentially a logical preliminary step towards an ACT-ID evidence base. To the authors’ knowledge, this novel approach is the first of its kind in the ID literature.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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Book part

Elizabeth Bernstein

In recent years, the issue of human trafficking has become a key component of a growing number of corporate social responsibility initiatives, in which multinational…

Abstract

In recent years, the issue of human trafficking has become a key component of a growing number of corporate social responsibility initiatives, in which multinational corporations have furthered the pursuit of “market based solutions” to contemporary social concerns. This essay draws upon in-depth interviews with and ethnographic observations of corporate actors involved in contemporary anti-trafficking campaigns to describe a new domain of sexual politics that feminist social theorists have barely begun to consider. Using trafficking as a case study, I argue that these new forms of sexual politics have served to bind together unlikely sets of social actors – including secular feminists, evangelical Christians, bipartisan state officials, and multinational corporations – who have historically subscribed to very different ideals about the beneficence of markets, criminal justice, and the role of the state.

Details

Perverse Politics? Feminism, Anti-Imperialism, Multiplicity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-074-9

Keywords

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