Search results

1 – 6 of 6
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Elizabeth Kehler

This author looks at unlocking the underpinning emotional drivers of choice among youth, developing a unified brand positioning targeted to diverse priorities and building…

Abstract

This author looks at unlocking the underpinning emotional drivers of choice among youth, developing a unified brand positioning targeted to diverse priorities and building brand loyalty within a life‐stage instead of over a life time.

Details

International Journal of Advertising and Marketing to Children, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6676

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Tom Schultheiss and Linda Mark

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

The very large number of books at present being issued relating to, or connected with the War, conclusively shows to what a great extent the intellectual as well as the…

Abstract

The very large number of books at present being issued relating to, or connected with the War, conclusively shows to what a great extent the intellectual as well as the material strength of the nation is engrossed by the terrible struggle in which we are engaged. But without abating any of our own interest in the supreme events now taking place, we may well pause to remember that things will not always be thus, and consider carefully before we crowd our shelves with works that are in many cases of very ephemeral value.

Details

New Library World, vol. 17 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Krishna Reddy, Stuart Locke and Fitriya Fauzi

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the registered charities in New Zealand have adopted the principle‐based corporate governance practices similar to those…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the registered charities in New Zealand have adopted the principle‐based corporate governance practices similar to those adopted by the publicly‐listed companies and the effect corporate governance practices have on their financial performance measured by technical efficiency, allocative efficiency and quick ratio. The paper addresses four important questions: how registered charities in New Zealand are managed and controlled; whether the funds donated to registered charities are utilised effectively; the nature of the corporate governance practiced by registered charities in New Zealand; and the nature of compliance to the Charities Act 2005.

Design/methodology/approach

Panel data for the registered charities over the period 2008‐2010 are analysed using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression and Tobit model regression. Technical efficiency, allocative efficiency and quick ratio are used as the dependent variables.

Findings

The findings indicate that there is no reporting requirement for the registered charities under the Charities Act 2005 to report detailed information regarding the board make‐up, board committees, board meetings, etc. and therefore, registered charities have not reported such information. The results show also that board gender diversity is an important corporate governance mechanism to mitigate agency problem in charitable organisations in New Zealand. However, large board size and large donors have potential to increase agency costs in charitable organisations in New Zealand.

Research limitations/implications

Caution should be exercised when interpreting and generalising the paper's results, as this study is a case study of registered charities in New Zealand and data comprised only large charities that have revenue over NZ$20 m. It should also be noted that there was a small sample size, which may have had a bearing on the results.

Practical implications

This study offers insights for policy makers and practitioners interested in adopting similar corporate governance practices within their country.

Social implications

Within New Zealand, issues relating to management and control of charitable organisations are better understood and as a consequence, development of sector‐wise standards could be initiated.

Originality/value

This research is novel as it investigates the nature of corporate governance practices relating to the registered charities in New Zealand. The availability of data provided by Charities Commission made this research possible.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Carlos Poblete and Vesna Mandakovic

This paper aims to analyze how different experts in entrepreneurship perceive their surrounding environment and business opportunities. The authors suggest that people act…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze how different experts in entrepreneurship perceive their surrounding environment and business opportunities. The authors suggest that people act the way they do not only because of different interpretations of the environment but also because of the relative importance they give to the context and themselves in their mental scripts.

Design/methodology/approach

A Mann–Whitney U non-parametric test and principal component analysis were conducted to examine the national expert survey from the global entrepreneurship monitor database of Chilean exports.

Findings

When experts in entrepreneurship are compared, entrepreneurs and non-entrepreneurs differ in their use of certain cognitive resources about past or current events, but they map out future situations similarly, suggesting that their mental simulations may converge into similar patterns.

Originality/value

This study provides useful insights regarding the impact that mental representation has on experts’ perception, by discussing how experts who are entrepreneurs perceive the entrepreneurial ecosystem and current opportunities differently than experts who are not entrepreneurs. The specific context plays a key role in the way entrepreneurs and non-entrepreneurs analyze their surrounding environment but not necessarily opportunities.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Bernard Njindan Iyke and Nicholas M. Odhiambo

The purpose of this paper is to examine the validity of the purchasing power parity (PPP) hypothesis for two Southern African countries, namely: Lesotho and Zambia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the validity of the purchasing power parity (PPP) hypothesis for two Southern African countries, namely: Lesotho and Zambia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilized four econometric tests to examine the existence of the PPP hypothesis in Lesotho and Zambia. These tests include two unit root tests without structural breaks – the Dickey-Fuller generalized least squares (DF-GLS) test and the Ng-Perron test; and two unit root tests with structural breaks – the Perron test and the Zivot-Andrews test. The authors’ empirical analysis is based on an annual data set with varying time periods. The sample period spanned 1960-2010 and 1955-2010, for Lesotho and Zambia, respectively.

Findings

The authors found that the PPP hypothesis was supported in the case of Lesotho, but rejected in the case of Zambia.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to simultaneously explore the exchange rate policies, trends, and the PPP for these two countries. The implication of this finding is that Lesotho is unlikely to profit immensely from trade and investment arbitrages; whereas Zambia is more likely to profit immensely from trade and investment arbitrage by trading with the USA. Moreover, the authors’ findings indicate that the PPP doctrine may be a useful guide for the exchange rate and other macroeconomic adjustment policies in Lesotho but not in Zambia.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

1 – 6 of 6