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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Ricardo Gomez and Elizabeth Gould

This paper aims to determine how trust and perceptions shape uses of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in public access venues (libraries, telecentres, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine how trust and perceptions shape uses of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in public access venues (libraries, telecentres, and cybercafés) in 25 developing countries around the world.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a global study conducted by the Technology & Social Change Group at the University of Washington, local research teams conducted surveys, site visits, and interviews of over 25,000 respondents in different types of public access venues in the selected countries, using a shared research design and analytical framework.

Findings

The use of public access venues is shaped by the following trust factors: safety concerns, relevance of the information, reputation of the institution, and users' perceptions of how “cool” these venues are. While libraries tend to be trusted as most reputable, telecentres tend to be trusted as most relevant to meet local needs, and cybercafés tend to be perceived as most “cool”.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited by its descriptive and not predictive nature, and is not based on a statistically representative sample of the population.

Practical implications

The insight presented in this paper can help inform policy decisions about public access initiatives, and inform future research to better understand the causes and consequences of trust in public access ICT. Understanding these perceptions helps gain a more nuanced understanding of the way services are provided in venues that offer public access to ICT.

Originality/value

This paper is novel as it covers public access to ICT in 25 developing countries across different types of venues, using a shared design and methodological approach. A study of this magnitude has never been done before. The findings provide valuable insight into understanding how people trust different types of public access ICT venues.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Renee Kuriyan, Kathi Kitner and Jerry Watkins

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on information and communication technologies (ICTs), development and trust and to introduce papers in the special…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on information and communication technologies (ICTs), development and trust and to introduce papers in the special issue: “Trust and information and communication technologies for development”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature on trust, broadly, and then, specifically, focuses on linkages to ICTs, and human development.

Findings

Trust is a broadly defined, yet relatively understudied concept in the context of ICTs and development (ICTD). The paper finds that there are many definitions of trust and ways it is constituted in the context of ICTD. It highlights the opportunity to contribute to the literature and this burgeoning field through research on trust in ICT‐mediated services or systems, trust in information and trust in institutions that are often key providers of these services.

Originality/value

The paper holds value to both academics and practitioners working in the field of ICTD by outlining the key programmatic areas in which research on this topic can be applied.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Karen Kuemmler and Brian H. Kleiner

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the service industry is responsible for over three‐fourths of all employment and is expected to account for all net job…

Abstract

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the service industry is responsible for over three‐fourths of all employment and is expected to account for all net job growth during the next decade. As this industry grows in size and economic importance, companies are rediscovering the value of those who deliver the service. As a result, experts believe survival for these businesses in the 1990s depends on creative approaches to finding, training, and retaining the best customer‐contact workers. While, unfortunately, most companies still view them as mindless robots, a few have managed to realize their importance and have made headway in encouraging them through conscientious management programmes. Their suggestions and examples can be a lesson to all.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1913

JOHANN FROBEN, the famous printer of Basle, was born at Hammelburg, in Franconia, about the year 1460. The exact year of his birth is not definitely known, but 1460 is…

Abstract

JOHANN FROBEN, the famous printer of Basle, was born at Hammelburg, in Franconia, about the year 1460. The exact year of his birth is not definitely known, but 1460 is probably not far wrong, as we find him established at Basle as a printer in 1491. He was educated at Basle University, where he distinguished himself as a scholar, particularly in the Latin, Greek, and Hebrew languages. After finishing his studies at Basle, he turned his attention to the then new art of printing, and he showed such aptitude that Johann Amerbach, another well‐known printer of Basle, who had set up a press in that city in 1481, induced him to devote his energies to the art, and appointed him to a position in his own printing establishment. Froben thus had the advantage of learning the art of printing under one of the best known printers of the period. In 1491, Froben set up a press of his own in Basle, having become a naturalized citizen of that city the previous year. He had been used in Amerbach's establishment to print with gothic types, and it was, therefore, but natural that his first production should also be printed in that type. This was an octavo Latin Bible, with two columns to a page, printed in a very small gothic type. He afterwards introduced the type invented by Aldus, that known as italic, the first book to be printed with this type being the Adagia of Erasmus, issued in 1513, of which mention is made later. Froben was also instrumental in making the roman type more popular in Germany, as although roman type had been used by German printers for about 20 years, having been introduced by Mentelin at Strassburg, about the year 1470, it was not so much in favour as the gothic type.

Details

New Library World, vol. 15 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2010

Ricardo Gomez

This paper aims to present the research methodology for the global study “Landscape of public access to ICT in 25 countries” (referred to as the Landscape study), a study…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the research methodology for the global study “Landscape of public access to ICT in 25 countries” (referred to as the Landscape study), a study conducted in 2007‐2009 by the University of Washington's Center for Information and Society, with a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study looked at public access venues (public libraries, telecenters, cybercafés, other) that offer public access to information, especially through information and communication technologies (ICT), in 25 countries around the world.

Findings

The paper describes here the criteria for the country selection, selection of local research partners in each country, research design considerations, data analysis, and limitations of the study.

Practical implications

The scope of the research undertook meant sacrificing some depth in exchange for breadth resulting in a broad blanket of understanding over a variety of topics, but not enough depth to really understand their intricacies, causes or effects. In future steps the authors intend to explore ways to adapt the research framework to apply it to in‐depth studies of a particular country or context.

Originality/value

This paper presents a research methodology example that is transferrable to other multi‐national surveys.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Elizabeth A. Whalen

While netnography was established to study virtual communities from the traditional ethnography methodology, over time it has evolved and moved away from standard…

Abstract

Purpose

While netnography was established to study virtual communities from the traditional ethnography methodology, over time it has evolved and moved away from standard ethnographic practices. The modifications are especially prevalent in hospitality and tourism research because of the nature of experiential and service-based goods. This gap has created exciting new opportunities for researchers. As netnography has matured into its own methodology, it has provided the opportunity for researchers to use netnography techniques or more traditional techniques by following ethnography methodologies. This paper aims to analyze the differences between these two methodologies within hospitality and tourism literature enabling researchers to choose the methodology that is most suited for their project.

Design/methodology/approach

This study reviews netnographic research in hospitality and tourism and compares current uses of netnography against traditional ethnographic methodologies.

Findings

There are four major differentiating points between netnography and ethnography: online community definitions, data collection methodologies, ethics in research and data analysis techniques.

Practical implications

In comparing ethnography and netnography in hospitality and tourism research, this analysis provides a foundation to evaluate the best use and best practices for these two distinct qualitative methodologies in the field. The study also provides references to how other hospitality and tourism researchers have used netnography.

Originality/value

Ethnographic principles grounded in the foundation of anthropological doctrines are important and distinct from netnography. The ability to use the diverse tools in the qualitative methods toolbox will help hospitality and tourism researchers understand the transforming marketplace.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Elizabeth Choinski

An average person's memory of the last biology book he or she has read is likely one of a dry tome lugged back and forth to a high school or college biology class. “Good…

Abstract

An average person's memory of the last biology book he or she has read is likely one of a dry tome lugged back and forth to a high school or college biology class. “Good books” and “biology” are not naturally linked in people's minds. This is an unfortunate occurrence, but one that is easily remedied. For anyone with a little curiosity about biology and a penchant for good books, the following bibliography provides some guidance. All but one of the authors included are or were trained as scientists. They all have a couple of traits in common, namely a passion for their work and a desire to share this passion with anyone who will listen. It is our good fortune that they are also excellent writers.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Dennis A. Norlin, Elizabeth R. Cardman, Elisabeth B. Davis, Raeann Dossett, Barbara Henigman, William H. Mischo and Leslie Troutman

Shortcomings in the BRS MENTOR mainframe interface and the desirability of using the workstation capabilities of the PC were factors in the decision to develop and…

Abstract

Shortcomings in the BRS MENTOR mainframe interface and the desirability of using the workstation capabilities of the PC were factors in the decision to develop and implement a microcomputer‐based interface to the BRS software and associated databases. The Interface Design Subcommittee's charge was to design and implement the interface components for the Library Information Workstation, a microcomputer public terminal that provides access to local and remote online catalogs, periodical index databases, campus information resources, and information files stored on the microcomputer. This article focuses on the design of the interface to the BRS/SEARCH software and ancillary periodical index databases—initially Current Contents, six Wilson databases, and ERIC.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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