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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Elizabeth Garland, Abigail Watts, John Doucette, Mary Foley, Araliya Senerat and Sadie Sanchez

Sedentary behavior is linked to health risks, and prolonged sitting is prevalent among office workers. Adjustable workstations (AWS) promote health by allowing transitions…

Abstract

Purpose

Sedentary behavior is linked to health risks, and prolonged sitting is prevalent among office workers. Adjustable workstations (AWS) promote health by allowing transitions between sitting and standing. Stand Up to Work compares workers with AWS to traditional desks (TD). The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Employees were randomly selected from one office floor to receive AWS, two identical floors maintained TD. Participants received workplace wellness and ergonomic training, completed self-administered questionnaires, and responded to repeated micropolling at baseline (T0), 3 (T1), 6 (T2), and 12 (T3) months in Atlanta, 2015-2016. Groups were compared using two-sample t-tests and nonparametric Wilcoxon tests.

Findings

Compared to TD (n = 24), participants with AWS (n = 24) reported significantly less sedentary behavior at T1 and T2 after AWS installation (p<0.05), with a retention rate at T2 of 80 and 65 percent for the AWS and TD group, respectively. In all, 47 percent of participants with AWS reported decline in upper back, shoulder, and neck discomfort (p=0.04); 88 percent of AWS participants reported convenience to use, 65 percent reported increased productivity, and 65 percent reported positive impact outside the workplace. Individuals with normal or underweight body mass index (BMI) reported a significantly greater decline in percent of time sitting compared to participants with overweight or obese BMI at all three time points.

Originality/value

AWS are beneficial in reducing sedentary behavior in and outside the workplace. Behavioral changes were sustained over time and associated with less self-reported muscle pain, more self-reported energy, and awareness of standing. When considering total worker health, employers should include options for AWS to promote reducing sedentary behavior.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1978

Elizabeth B. Pollard

Art reference publishing has not been quite as voluminous this year as last year, but there is some evidence of greater selectivity and organization in the tools produced…

Abstract

Art reference publishing has not been quite as voluminous this year as last year, but there is some evidence of greater selectivity and organization in the tools produced during the period of this survey. The continued publication of the Repertoire International de la Litterature de l'Art (RILA Abstracts), now complete through the 1977 volume, is helping to fill some of the vast gaps which previously existed in current bibliographical coverage of modern art and contemporary art historical research on an international basis. Retrospective bibliographical coverage is slowly but surely being filled in by the subject, country, and period bibliographies on which many scholars and several publishers have been concentrating in the past few years. Some excellent examples of these may be found in three established series of continuing value: the “Art and Architecture Information Guide Series” from Gale Research Company, “Art and Architecture Bibliographies,” published by Hennessey & Ingalls, and selected titles from the “Garland Reference Library of the Humanities.” In addition, there are outstanding titles to be found in some bibliographical series with broader subject bases, such as the “Information Resources Series” from ABC‐Clio.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Marie Gottschalk

Discussion of the 2016 electorate has centered on two poles: results of public opinion and voter surveys that attempt to tease out whether racial, cultural, or economic…

Abstract

Discussion of the 2016 electorate has centered on two poles: results of public opinion and voter surveys that attempt to tease out whether racial, cultural, or economic grievances were the prime drivers behind the Trump vote and analyses that tie major shifts in the political economy to consequential shifts in the voting behavior of certain demographic and geographic groups. Both approaches render invisible a major development since the 1970s that has been transforming the political, social, and economic landscape of wide swaths of people who do not reside in major urban areas or their prosperous suburban rings: the emergence and consolidation of the carceral state. This chapter sketches out some key contours of the carceral state that have been transforming the polity and economy for poor and working-class people, with a particular focus on rural areas and the declining Rust Belt. It is meant as a correction to the stilted portrait of these groups that congealed in the aftermath of the 2016 election, thanks to their pivotal contribution to Trump's victory. This chapter is not an alternative causal explanation that identifies the carceral state as the key factor in the 2016 election. Rather, it is a call to aggressively widen the analytical lens of studies of the carceral state, which have tended to focus on communities of color in urban areas.

Details

Rethinking Class and Social Difference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-020-5

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 21 January 2021

Yellen is widely regarded as a ‘safe pair of hands’; Biden’s other choices for financial regulatory roles are unlikely to infringe the priorities of Democratic donors…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB258930

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Richard Kalwa and Arthur G. Bedeian

Elizabeth Walker is one of today's career women who has received increasing media attention over the last decade.

Abstract

Elizabeth Walker is one of today's career women who has received increasing media attention over the last decade.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Eleanor S. Block

The emphasis of this survey is on motion picture reference material that has been published since 1982. This update does not, for the most part, include titles covered in…

Abstract

The emphasis of this survey is on motion picture reference material that has been published since 1982. This update does not, for the most part, include titles covered in a prior RSR article (1:4; 1983), written by myself, or in an even earlier article by Leslie Kane (7:1; 1979). In those few instances where titles that have appeared in the earlier RSR film surveys are discussed, it is because they now have a new subject emphasis.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2014

Rose Ricciardelli, Hayley Crichton and Lisa Adams

In this chapter, we explicate the evolution of Canadian corrections, the political, social and judicial realities that have shaped punishment and imprisonment over…

Abstract

Purpose

In this chapter, we explicate the evolution of Canadian corrections, the political, social and judicial realities that have shaped punishment and imprisonment over history. We reveal how such factors continue to leave their mark on the current Canadian federal criminal justice system and its structures of incarceration.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive review of accessible literatures detailing the nation’s development of punishment and incarceration is presented. The history of imprisonment is traced up to the current year and the role of penal populism as theorized by Garland (2001) and, later, Pratt (2007) is presented to discern the motivations for the current punitive correctional rhetoric, as well as its impact on conditions of confinement and program implementation in penitentiaries.

Findings

Canada’s correctional history is largely shaped by how punishment is defined and how such definitions are influenced by members of society; including victims, perpetrators, politicians and media personalities. The realities of current conditions of confinement have been impacted by social and political pressures that encourage increasingly punitive policies oriented towards ‘tough on crime’ initiatives. Current corrections are characterized by overcrowding, concerns about rehabilitative programming and resource allocation and mental health care.

Originality/value

Recent legislative amendments have solidified a ‘tough on crime’ agenda in Canada, however the process underlying the movement towards the acceptance, even public demand, for such legislative changes remain in need of dissemination; particularly in light of the decades of decreasing crime rates in the country.

Details

Punishment and Incarceration: A Global Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-907-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

Esther Stineman

We've been living in a homogenous world, you know a world centered on and seen through the language perceptions of men. The consequences of this for everything that we…

Abstract

We've been living in a homogenous world, you know a world centered on and seen through the language perceptions of men. The consequences of this for everything that we take for granted, for all our assumptions are very deep. Feminism, in the sense I use it, is a radical complexity thought in the process of transforming itself. It is a kind of breaking open of not only the oversimplification but of the lies and the silence in which so much of human experience has been cloaked. Too much has been left out, too much has been unmentioned, too much has been made taboo. Too many connections have been disguised or denied. (Interview with Adrienne Rich, Christopher Street, Jan. 1977, pp. 9–16.)

Details

Collection Building, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Janice Huber, M. Shaun Murphy and D. Jean Clandinin

Elizabeth told her parents she wants to be an inventor but they said she should be a dentist. Elizabeth told us that being a dentist is okay with her because they make…

Abstract

Elizabeth told her parents she wants to be an inventor but they said she should be a dentist. Elizabeth told us that being a dentist is okay with her because they make stuff – they still invent so she can be a dentist. (Field notes, March 9, 2007)Today as Ji-Sook shared her collage with the class, she emphasized her family in Korea, her church, and the Bible, three topics that came up several times. She talked about Betta, her fish who is also her family and who she talks to when she is sad. Her symbols of belonging were trees and friendship: trees are about belonging for without them the ground would be cracked, there would no oxygen and we would be dead; friendship is like a broken toy – both can be mended. (Field notes, May 9, 2007)

Details

Places of Curriculum Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-828-2

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