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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Allard E. Dembe, Jamie S. Partridge, Elizabeth Dugan and Diane S. Piktialis

This study aims to evaluate whether employees consider employer‐sponsored elder‐care programs to benefit aging family members and whether those programs help employees…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate whether employees consider employer‐sponsored elder‐care programs to benefit aging family members and whether those programs help employees with caregiving needs, stay productively employed.

Design/methodology/approach

A nationwide internet‐based survey was conducted between December 2008 and May 2009, eliciting information from 447 users of employer‐sponsored elder‐care services. Survey participants were employed individuals who had requested assistance from one of five national elder‐care service provider organizations (SPOs) during the preceding two years.

Findings

A majority of respondents reported that the services helped them to keep working productively (74.0 percent), avoid job absences (65.5 percent), stay employed (58.0 percent), and maintain a good family life at home (72.1 percent). Respondents were generally satisfied with the services provided by SPOs. However, most respondents did not feel that the services help minimize caregiving expenses.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first US study evaluating the usefulness of employer elder‐care programs, based on the perspectives of employees who have used the programs.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Michael T. Dugan, Elizabeth H. Turner and Clark M. Wheatley

This paper aims to examine the association of accruals and disaggregated pension components with future cash flows and also to investigate whether investors distinguish…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the association of accruals and disaggregated pension components with future cash flows and also to investigate whether investors distinguish between pension information that is recognized (SFAS 158) versus disclosed (SFAS 132).

Design/methodology/approach

Regression analysis is used with a proxy for expected future cash flows as the dependent variable, and the components of pension disclosures as well as controls for the 2008-2009 financial crisis as the independent variables.

Findings

The results reveal that incorporating disaggregated pension components increases the ability to predict future cash flows, and that investors attach different pricing multiples to the various components in the models. The authors also find that during the 2008-2009 financial crisis, the signs of the coefficients on these components changed. Finally, the results indicate that investors assign more significance to pension accounting information that is recognized, as opposed to disclosed, and that disclosure affects the allocation of pension assets.

Originality/value

The authors provide empirical support for the conjecture posited by Amir and Benartzi (1998) that the prediction of future cash flows will be enhanced by the incorporation of the components of pension assets and liabilities. Importantly from a standard setting perspective, the authors also find evidence that investors assign more significance to pension accounting information that is recognized in the financial statements than to pension information that is disclosed.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Global and Culturally Diverse Leaders and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-495-0

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Elizabeth M. Dalton

Little is known about how assistive technology standards have been implemented in preservice teacher preparation. This chapter provides a review of the literature…

Abstract

Little is known about how assistive technology standards have been implemented in preservice teacher preparation. This chapter provides a review of the literature concerning the importance of evidence-based practice and the research base supporting assistive technology in order to set the context for reporting the results of a comprehensive national study of the status of assistive technology state standards for teachers in all of the 50 states (plus Washington, DC). This chapter includes the findings of the study, the research that the study was based upon, and a review of relevant research in the fields of assistive technology, educational technology, and evidence-based practice. Only six states reported having AT standards and six states reported having AT competencies. Three states reported having both standards and competencies, yielding nine unique states (out of 51) with AT standards and/or AT competencies. Regression analyses to determine the relationship between the study variables and national reading and math performance of students with disabilities were inconclusive. The implications of the study findings and recommendations for future research are presented.

Details

Efficacy of Assistive Technology Interventions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-641-6

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Elizabeth Choinski and Michelle Emanuel

To describe the design and use of an outcomes assessment tool for one‐shot library instruction classes that is objective, quantitative, easy to use, and flexible.

Abstract

Purpose

To describe the design and use of an outcomes assessment tool for one‐shot library instruction classes that is objective, quantitative, easy to use, and flexible.

Design/methodology/approach

An “outcomes” assessment tool was created based on the ideas of the one‐minute paper and student reflection papers. The tool was administered to classes in Spanish and Biology that had one shot library sessions.

Findings

The assessment tool was helpful in pointing out areas where librarians need to improve instruction in their one shot classes. The tool was useful, easy to use, and fulfilled our objectives.

Research limitations/implications

The tool's use may be limited to institutions where there is excellent rapport between librarians and course instructors or to libraries with a staff large enough to find volunteers to grade the papers outside of the course librarian.

Practical implications

The tool developed provides one more weapon for the outcomes assessment arsenal.

Originality/value

This contribution is unique; there is no other outcomes assessment tool for one‐shot classes in the library literature. Because one‐shot sessions are the majority of library instruction appearances and because outcomes assessment is very important, this tool should be of great practical help to instruction librarians.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Paula N. Warnken and Victoria L. Young

Library instruction has become a public services program at most academic libraries. As such, it has the potential of being a library's most innovative and visible…

Abstract

Library instruction has become a public services program at most academic libraries. As such, it has the potential of being a library's most innovative and visible program. Yet, no matter how innovative, such a program cannot become visible without the support of the entire university community. Librarians, administrators, faculty members, and students alike must perceive a need and value for an instructional program if it is to be implemented successfully.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Robert C. Ford and David D. Van Fleet

The purpose of this paper is to examine the management innovations developed and implemented by the Harvey House restaurants with specific attention to those human…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the management innovations developed and implemented by the Harvey House restaurants with specific attention to those human resource policies and procedures that were created to use what many believe to be the first large-scale use of single women working away from home, the famous Harvey Girls. A second purpose of this paper is to use bricolage theory to frame the innovations that Harvey pioneered to illustrate how the theory pertains to this entrepreneur who civilized dining in the “Wild West.”

Design/methodology/approach

This paper relies on secondary and archival sources to inform its points and rationale.

Findings

Fred Harvey applied his experience-gained knowledge to invent a system that would provide meals to railroad travelers along the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad that were not only consistently excellent and reasonably priced but also could be served within the tight time limits of train stops for fuel and water. The precision of his service standards was innovative and required trained and disciplined servers. To deliver the quality of service for which his company became known across the “Wild West.” Harvey invented his famous Harvey Girls.

Originality/value

Fred Harvey’s invention of the Harvey Girls represents the first large-scale employment of women and required the invention of human resource management policies, procedures and processes. This is the story of how this management innovator successfully applied entrepreneurial bricolage to bring civilized dining to the “Wild West.”

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Hugh A. Holden and Margaret Deng

The purpose of the article is to gauge reaction to the implementation of a wireless laptop lending program in a university library before it actually became operational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the article is to gauge reaction to the implementation of a wireless laptop lending program in a university library before it actually became operational and wireless access itself became available.

Design/methodology/approach

This online survey consisted of 22 multiple choice questions that all Monmouth University students and employees were invited by e‐mail to answer.

Findings

The vast majority of responses came from students, and most of them were ready for wireless access in the library and across campus. Several re‐emphasized in text their desire to log‐on to the network with their own laptops.

Research limitations/implications

The survey ran for only two weeks, and yet, because tabulation was done by hand, a response rate ten times greater would have made our method impracticable.

Practical implications

This kind of survey is comparatively easy and fast to implement. It lends itself to follow‐up surveys to measure the success of a wireless computer program or other technological development, including the possible effects on user attitude.

Originality/value

This study was original in that it took place just before a wireless laptop‐lending program was activated. Tightly focused online surveys with a limited number of questions can help librarians anticipate issues not considered or sufficiently emphasized earlier, or quickly assess the impact wireless access is having.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1973

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Frances A. Miller

In September 1985, eight sets of children's books from Australia began an odyssey that will take them into all fifty states and Canada by the end of 1988. The books— and…

Abstract

In September 1985, eight sets of children's books from Australia began an odyssey that will take them into all fifty states and Canada by the end of 1988. The books— and the resource, reference and display materials that accompany them—were chosen specifically for their value in introducing non‐Australians to Australia and her children's literature. They also provide an ideal starting point for library collection development.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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