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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Elizabeth Clarke

High order leadership, problem solving skills, and the capacity for innovation in new markets, and technologically complex and multidimensional contexts, are the new set…

2820

Abstract

Purpose

High order leadership, problem solving skills, and the capacity for innovation in new markets, and technologically complex and multidimensional contexts, are the new set of skills that are most valued by companies and employers alike. Business simulation exercises are one way of enhancing these skills. This article aims to examine the capacity of business simulations to deliver the learning outcomes they have the potential to achieve, and the challenges faced in implementing these technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature of the learning outcomes from business simulations, and critical assessment of the challenges and problems involved in the implementation of learning technologies.

Findings

Traditionally, postgraduate business education programs have adopted the functional silos that provide the organizational framework for the design of the curriculum. Business problems rarely present themselves in the compartmentalized silo supply‐driven disciplinary framework. The question of how to achieve greater convergence of the business curriculum programs that offer students more practical oriented experiences to develop their conceptual understanding in cross functional decision making and analytical thinking abilities through “learning by doing” of real business problems, has concerned business education for a considerable time.

Originality/value

The article shows that the prospect of adopting a broad‐based, integrative approach that goes beyond the conventional lectures and case studies complemented by business simulations and emerging technologies has significant potential to resolve the traditional problems of business education convergence of the curriculum.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Rebecca Cahill and Judith Pettigrew

In the early to mid-twentieth century, psychiatrist-led occupational therapy departments emerged in Irish psychiatric hospitals. This marked a transition towards…

Abstract

Purpose

In the early to mid-twentieth century, psychiatrist-led occupational therapy departments emerged in Irish psychiatric hospitals. This marked a transition towards establishing rehabilitative services in institutional settings. This paper aims to examine the development of occupational therapy in Grangegorman Mental Hospital and its auxiliary hospital, Portrane Mental Hospital from 1934-1954.

Design/methodology/approach

Historical documentary research methods were used to analyse primary source data from Grangegorman Committee Minutes, Inspector of Mental Hospital Reports, Boroughs of Mental Hospitals, Department of Foreign Affairs documents and newspaper archives. The archival data was analysed using both a chronological and thematic approach.

Findings

The main key event emerged in 1935 when four Grangegorman nursing staff were sent to Cardiff Mental Hospital to undergo a six month training course in occupational therapy. The following themes emerged – “establishing occupational therapy in Grangegorman and Portrane”; “the role of short-course trained nursing staff in providing occupational therapy services” and “therapeutic rationales vs hospital management rationales”.

Originality/value

This study throws light on the early practitioners of occupational therapy in Grangegorman and highlights the complexities of occupational therapy’s role origins in mid-twentieth century Ireland. In line with contemporaneous psychiatric hospitals, the occupational therapy activities promoted in Grangegorman were mainly handicraft or productivity based. The absence of patients’ voices means there are limitations to determining the therapeutic nature of this early occupational therapy service.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Thomas Clarke and Elizabeth Clarke

The purpose of this article is to examine the impact of the shift to a knowledge society, where information and communication technology (ICT) and the widening spread of…

2656

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the impact of the shift to a knowledge society, where information and communication technology (ICT) and the widening spread of internationally distributed information are creating a “skill revolution”, as O'Hara suggests, there is a widening culture mismatch between what members of the knowledge society need to succeed and what current systems of higher education are geared to offer and to adequately prepare people and communities to thrive in the global knowledge society.

Design/methodology/approach

For universities, as the scope and complexity of the actual business environment grows, the changing landscape of business education needs to come to terms with a developing global environment that has impacted on business, demographics and culture which demands a change in managerial skills to lead sustainable enterprise.

Findings

Students need to master higher‐order cognitive, affective, and social skills not central to mature industrial societies, but vital in a knowledge based economy that include “thriving on chaos” (making rapid decisions based on incomplete information to resolve novel situations); the ability to collaborate with a diverse team – face‐to‐face or across distance – to accomplish a task; creating, sharing, and mastering knowledge through filtering a sea of quasi‐accurate information.

Originality/value

These skills, according to Galerneau and Zibit, are “the skills for the twenty‐first century”, as they are “the skills that are necessary to succeed in an ever changing global society where communications is ubiquitous and instantaneous, and where software tools allow for a range of creative and collaborative options that yield new patterns and results that we are only beginning to see”.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Antoine Hermens and Elizabeth Clarke

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of computer based business simulations in higher education as innovative tools of teaching and learning to enhance…

1803

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of computer based business simulations in higher education as innovative tools of teaching and learning to enhance students' practical understanding of real business problems. Whether the integration of business simulation technologies will enable significant innovation in teaching and learning and will significantly enhance the quality and efficiency of traditional management teaching and learning methods is to be examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Previous research has established that simulations can be an effective integrative learning mechanism for the student participant seeking to understand management concepts, techniques and practices. A number of prominent training institutions have adopted simulations in order to increase business acumen, financial literacy and build competency.

Findings

The research carried out seems to confirm that simulations can be powerful, engaging, dynamic and effective teaching and learning tools. The immersive worlds of simulations can be designed to replicate actual economic, market and business events where students experiment in real time with alignment and commitment surrounding complex corporate strategies, business models and initiatives.

Originality/value

To achieve the required convergence of the business curriculum, the paper suggests that a broad‐based integrative approach needs to be adopted to overcome the silo effect of supply driven disciplinary models, which have traditionally prevailed in business education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

John Chelliah and Elizabeth Clarke

This paper aims to examine pedagogical issues in higher education as a result of the shift to a social networking society where Web 2.0 collaborative technologies increase

3404

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine pedagogical issues in higher education as a result of the shift to a social networking society where Web 2.0 collaborative technologies increase user creativity, contributing to unique forms of communication and community building that support a “social constructivism”. In this context, it is becoming clear that traditional pedagogical models cannot be sustained into the future. Engaging the digital generation of students in a learning process that emphasizes creation of skill sets that match views on twenty‐first‐century learning skills (problem solving, self‐regulated learning, collaboration, sharing ideas, focus on learning etc.) as well as views on 21st‐century employability skills (communication, collaboration, creativity, leadership and technology proficiency, etc.) is the new imperative. This paper seeks to identify related pedagogical challenges and to provide some recommendations for higher education institutions towards tackling these challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of the opportunities presented by emerging Web 2.0 technologies and critical assessment of the challenges in addressing the transformation of pedagogical needs is the approach taken in this paper.

Findings

Emerging Web 2.0 technologies are pervading higher education and have the potential to trigger learning innovation and enhance teaching and learning. However, technologies are and remain tools and cannot by themselves generate innovation, nor realize many educators' vision for technology to improve education. Technology by itself cannot change the nature of classroom instruction unless educators are able to evaluate and integrate the use of that technology into the curriculum. Changes such as addressing organizational and cultural factors that reflect the whole institution governance community's combined efforts to create a new and all embracing concept for higher education are also necessary. By identifying and addressing those dimensions of organizational development which are most affected by drivers and directions of change, higher education can remain relevant in the future.

Originality/value

The paper provides a theoretical analysis in relation to the pedagogical role of social technologies in teaching and learning, with concern for the contrast between generational differences in relation to perceptions of learning and teaching and the limitations of technology.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Janet Newman

This article highlights challenges faced by researchers in the Department of Health's programme of research on Modernising Adult Social Care in trying to assess the impact…

Abstract

This article highlights challenges faced by researchers in the Department of Health's programme of research on Modernising Adult Social Care in trying to assess the impact of reform on service users. It explores the changing relationship between service users and service providers, focusing in particular on the author's own research as part of an ESRC/AHRB‐funded project on Creating citizenconsumers: changing relationships and identifications. Rather than a one‐way relationship between policy reform and user impact, the article highlights the importance of bringing users into the research process itself.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Carolyn Sufrin, Sara Baird, Jennifer Clarke and Elizabeth Feldman

Incarcerated women around the globe are predominantly of reproductive age. Most of these women have been pregnant before, and many want to be sexually active and avoid…

Abstract

Purpose

Incarcerated women around the globe are predominantly of reproductive age. Most of these women have been pregnant before, and many want to be sexually active and avoid pregnancy upon release. Yet few of these women are on a regular method of contraception. Providing contraceptive services for women in custody benefits individual and public health goals of reducing unintended pregnancy. This policy briefing reviews evidence for an unmet need for family planning in the correctional setting, and policy implications for expanding services. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors describe four model programs in the USA with established contraceptive services on site, highlighting practical steps other facilities can implement.

Findings

Correctional facilities health administrators, providers, advocates, and legislators should advance policies which should counsel women on family planning and should make a range of contraceptive methods available before release, while remaining sensitive to the potential pressure these women may feel to use birth control in this unique environment.

Practical implications

Family planning services for incarcerated women benefits individuals, facilities, and the community.

Social implications

Policies which enable correctional facilities to provide comprehensive family planning to incarcerated women – including reproductive life goals counseling and contraceptive method provision – promote equity in access to critical reproductive health services and also provide broad scale population level benefits in preventing unintended pregnancy or enabling counseling for healthy pregnancies for a group of women who often have limited access to such services.

Originality/value

This policy briefing highlights an area of health care in prisons and jails which gets little attention in research and in policy circles: family planning services for incarcerated women. In addition to reviewing the importance of such services for this population, the authors also highlight model family planning programs in correctional facilities. These provide actionable insights for other administrators and providers.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2014

Louis Bailey, Sonja J. Ellis and Jay McNeil

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from the Trans Mental Health Study (McNeil et al., 2012) – the largest survey of the UK trans population to date and the…

1316

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from the Trans Mental Health Study (McNeil et al., 2012) – the largest survey of the UK trans population to date and the first to explore trans mental health and well-being within a UK context. Findings around suicidal ideation and suicide attempt are presented and the impact of gender dysphoria, minority stress and medical delay, in particular, are highlighted.

Design/methodology/approach

This represents a narrative analysis of qualitative sections of a survey that utilised both open and closed questions. The study drew on a non-random sample (n=889), obtained via a range of UK-based support organisations and services.

Findings

The study revealed high rates of suicidal ideation (84 per cent lifetime prevalence) and attempted suicide (48 per cent lifetime prevalence) within this sample. A supportive environment for social transition and timely access to gender reassignment, for those who required it, emerged as key protective factors. Subsequently, gender dysphoria, confusion/denial about gender, fears around transitioning, gender reassignment treatment delays and refusals, and social stigma increased suicide risk within this sample.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the limitations of undertaking research with this population, the research is not demographically representative.

Practical implications

The study found that trans people are most at risk prior to social and/or medical transition and that, in many cases, trans people who require access to hormones and surgery can be left unsupported for dangerously long periods of time. The paper highlights the devastating impact that delaying or denying gender reassignment treatment can have and urges commissioners and practitioners to prioritise timely intervention and support.

Originality/value

The first exploration of suicidal ideation and suicide attempt within the UK trans population revealing key findings pertaining to social and medical transition, crucial for policy makers, commissioners and practitioners working across gender identity services, mental health services and suicide prevention.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Gautam Gulati, Valerie Murphy, Ana Clarke, Kristin Delcellier, David Meagher, Harry Kennedy, Elizabeth Fistein, John Bogue and Colum P. Dunne

While individuals with an intellectual disability form a significant minority in the worldwide prison population, their healthcare needs require specialist attention. In…

Abstract

Purpose

While individuals with an intellectual disability form a significant minority in the worldwide prison population, their healthcare needs require specialist attention. In Ireland, services for prisoners with intellectual disabilities need development. However, there is little substantive data estimating the prevalence of intellectual disabilities within the Irish prison system. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors systematically review published data relating to the prevalence of intellectual disabilities in prisons in the Republic of Ireland. The authors searched four databases, governmental websites and corresponded with experts.

Findings

Little published data were elicited from searches except for one nationwide cross-sectional survey which reflected a higher prevalence than reported in international studies. Studies from forensic mental health populations are narrated to contextualise findings.

Originality/value

This study found that there is little data to accurately estimate the prevalence of intellectual disabilities in the Irish prison system and the limited data available suggests that this is likely to be higher than international estimates. The authors highlight the need for further research to accurately estimate prevalence in this jurisdiction, alongside the need to develop screening and care pathways for prisoners with an intellectual disability.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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