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1 – 10 of 665
Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Elizabeth Clarke

High order leadership, problem solving skills, and the capacity for innovation in new markets, and technologically complex and multidimensional contexts, are the new set of skills…

3079

Abstract

Purpose

High order leadership, problem solving skills, and the capacity for innovation in new markets, and technologically complex and multidimensional contexts, are the new set of skills that are most valued by companies and employers alike. Business simulation exercises are one way of enhancing these skills. This article aims to examine the capacity of business simulations to deliver the learning outcomes they have the potential to achieve, and the challenges faced in implementing these technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature of the learning outcomes from business simulations, and critical assessment of the challenges and problems involved in the implementation of learning technologies.

Findings

Traditionally, postgraduate business education programs have adopted the functional silos that provide the organizational framework for the design of the curriculum. Business problems rarely present themselves in the compartmentalized silo supply‐driven disciplinary framework. The question of how to achieve greater convergence of the business curriculum programs that offer students more practical oriented experiences to develop their conceptual understanding in cross functional decision making and analytical thinking abilities through “learning by doing” of real business problems, has concerned business education for a considerable time.

Originality/value

The article shows that the prospect of adopting a broad‐based, integrative approach that goes beyond the conventional lectures and case studies complemented by business simulations and emerging technologies has significant potential to resolve the traditional problems of business education convergence of the curriculum.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Rebecca Cahill and Judith Pettigrew

In the early to mid-twentieth century, psychiatrist-led occupational therapy departments emerged in Irish psychiatric hospitals. This marked a transition towards establishing…

1351

Abstract

Purpose

In the early to mid-twentieth century, psychiatrist-led occupational therapy departments emerged in Irish psychiatric hospitals. This marked a transition towards establishing rehabilitative services in institutional settings. This paper aims to examine the development of occupational therapy in Grangegorman Mental Hospital and its auxiliary hospital, Portrane Mental Hospital from 1934-1954.

Design/methodology/approach

Historical documentary research methods were used to analyse primary source data from Grangegorman Committee Minutes, Inspector of Mental Hospital Reports, Boroughs of Mental Hospitals, Department of Foreign Affairs documents and newspaper archives. The archival data was analysed using both a chronological and thematic approach.

Findings

The main key event emerged in 1935 when four Grangegorman nursing staff were sent to Cardiff Mental Hospital to undergo a six month training course in occupational therapy. The following themes emerged – “establishing occupational therapy in Grangegorman and Portrane”; “the role of short-course trained nursing staff in providing occupational therapy services” and “therapeutic rationales vs hospital management rationales”.

Originality/value

This study throws light on the early practitioners of occupational therapy in Grangegorman and highlights the complexities of occupational therapy’s role origins in mid-twentieth century Ireland. In line with contemporaneous psychiatric hospitals, the occupational therapy activities promoted in Grangegorman were mainly handicraft or productivity based. The absence of patients’ voices means there are limitations to determining the therapeutic nature of this early occupational therapy service.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2023

Carolyn Caffrey, Hannah Lee, Tessa Withorn, Elizabeth Galoozis, Maggie Clarke, Thomas Philo, Jillian Eslami, Dana Ospina, Aric Haas, Katie Paris Kohn, Kendra Macomber, Hallie Clawson and Wendolyn Vermeer

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy. It provides an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy. It provides an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications organized thematically and detailing, study populations, results and research contexts. The selected bibliography is useful to efficiently keep up with trends in library instruction for academic library practitioners, library science students and those wishing to learn about information literacy in other contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This article annotates 340 English-language periodical articles, dissertations, theses and reports on library instruction and information literacy published in 2022. The sources were selected from the EBSCO platform for Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts (LISTA), Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), Elsevier SCOPUS and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. Sources selected were published in 2022 and included the terms “information literacy,” “library instruction,” or “information fluency” in the title, subject terms, or author supplied keywords. The sources were organized in Zotero. Annotations were made summarizing the source, focusing on the findings or implications. Each source was then thematically categorized and organized for academic librarians to be able to skim and use the annotated bibliography efficiently.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of 340 sources from 144 unique publications, and highlights publications that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions. Further analysis of the sources and authorship are provided.

Originality/value

The information is primarily of use to academic librarians, researchers, and anyone interested as a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy published within 2022.

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Thomas Clarke and Elizabeth Clarke

The purpose of this article is to examine the impact of the shift to a knowledge society, where information and communication technology (ICT) and the widening spread of…

2741

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the impact of the shift to a knowledge society, where information and communication technology (ICT) and the widening spread of internationally distributed information are creating a “skill revolution”, as O'Hara suggests, there is a widening culture mismatch between what members of the knowledge society need to succeed and what current systems of higher education are geared to offer and to adequately prepare people and communities to thrive in the global knowledge society.

Design/methodology/approach

For universities, as the scope and complexity of the actual business environment grows, the changing landscape of business education needs to come to terms with a developing global environment that has impacted on business, demographics and culture which demands a change in managerial skills to lead sustainable enterprise.

Findings

Students need to master higher‐order cognitive, affective, and social skills not central to mature industrial societies, but vital in a knowledge based economy that include “thriving on chaos” (making rapid decisions based on incomplete information to resolve novel situations); the ability to collaborate with a diverse team – face‐to‐face or across distance – to accomplish a task; creating, sharing, and mastering knowledge through filtering a sea of quasi‐accurate information.

Originality/value

These skills, according to Galerneau and Zibit, are “the skills for the twenty‐first century”, as they are “the skills that are necessary to succeed in an ever changing global society where communications is ubiquitous and instantaneous, and where software tools allow for a range of creative and collaborative options that yield new patterns and results that we are only beginning to see”.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Antoine Hermens and Elizabeth Clarke

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of computer based business simulations in higher education as innovative tools of teaching and learning to enhance students'…

1853

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of computer based business simulations in higher education as innovative tools of teaching and learning to enhance students' practical understanding of real business problems. Whether the integration of business simulation technologies will enable significant innovation in teaching and learning and will significantly enhance the quality and efficiency of traditional management teaching and learning methods is to be examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Previous research has established that simulations can be an effective integrative learning mechanism for the student participant seeking to understand management concepts, techniques and practices. A number of prominent training institutions have adopted simulations in order to increase business acumen, financial literacy and build competency.

Findings

The research carried out seems to confirm that simulations can be powerful, engaging, dynamic and effective teaching and learning tools. The immersive worlds of simulations can be designed to replicate actual economic, market and business events where students experiment in real time with alignment and commitment surrounding complex corporate strategies, business models and initiatives.

Originality/value

To achieve the required convergence of the business curriculum, the paper suggests that a broad‐based integrative approach needs to be adopted to overcome the silo effect of supply driven disciplinary models, which have traditionally prevailed in business education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

John Chelliah and Elizabeth Clarke

This paper aims to examine pedagogical issues in higher education as a result of the shift to a social networking society where Web 2.0 collaborative technologies increase user

3700

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine pedagogical issues in higher education as a result of the shift to a social networking society where Web 2.0 collaborative technologies increase user creativity, contributing to unique forms of communication and community building that support a “social constructivism”. In this context, it is becoming clear that traditional pedagogical models cannot be sustained into the future. Engaging the digital generation of students in a learning process that emphasizes creation of skill sets that match views on twenty‐first‐century learning skills (problem solving, self‐regulated learning, collaboration, sharing ideas, focus on learning etc.) as well as views on 21st‐century employability skills (communication, collaboration, creativity, leadership and technology proficiency, etc.) is the new imperative. This paper seeks to identify related pedagogical challenges and to provide some recommendations for higher education institutions towards tackling these challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of the opportunities presented by emerging Web 2.0 technologies and critical assessment of the challenges in addressing the transformation of pedagogical needs is the approach taken in this paper.

Findings

Emerging Web 2.0 technologies are pervading higher education and have the potential to trigger learning innovation and enhance teaching and learning. However, technologies are and remain tools and cannot by themselves generate innovation, nor realize many educators' vision for technology to improve education. Technology by itself cannot change the nature of classroom instruction unless educators are able to evaluate and integrate the use of that technology into the curriculum. Changes such as addressing organizational and cultural factors that reflect the whole institution governance community's combined efforts to create a new and all embracing concept for higher education are also necessary. By identifying and addressing those dimensions of organizational development which are most affected by drivers and directions of change, higher education can remain relevant in the future.

Originality/value

The paper provides a theoretical analysis in relation to the pedagogical role of social technologies in teaching and learning, with concern for the contrast between generational differences in relation to perceptions of learning and teaching and the limitations of technology.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2023

Lia Blaj-Ward and Stuart Perrin

The closing chapter offers additional reflection on two substantial threads which run throughout the volume. Firstly, quality education (SDG4). Contributors to the volume have…

Abstract

The closing chapter offers additional reflection on two substantial threads which run throughout the volume. Firstly, quality education (SDG4). Contributors to the volume have articulated with varying degrees of explicitness what quality education means in their specific contexts. Complementary perspective is offered in the closing chapter, through the inclusion of personal interpretations from two students in their last but one year of high school in the United Kingdom. The students are reflecting back on a week of work experience in a university and looking forward to their university journey. Amrita Narang has kindly provided a response to these personal reflections, drawing on her experience of learning and working in various national higher education contexts. Aspects the two students highlight resonate with the ethos of entrepreneurial education. An example of entrepreneurial learning in a collaborative Sino-UK higher education venture is therefore included here, showcasing ways in which students can further grow their strengths, with bespoke entrepreneurial mentoring support.

The mentoring thread running throughout the volume is picked up in the final chapter with specific reference to contracting (a staple element of formal mentoring relationships, achieved in complex and subtle ways in informal ones), closure and co-learning. All chapter contributions focus on long-term, ongoing mentoring relationships, in which closure is temporary and is viewed as a stepping stone for subsequent learning opportunities. To facilitate continued learning in readers, the final section in the chapter invites them to pause and reflect, signposting three sources of insight and wisdom for sustainability-oriented lifelong learning and action.

Details

Mentoring Within and Beyond Academia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83797-565-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Janet Newman

This article highlights challenges faced by researchers in the Department of Health's programme of research on Modernising Adult Social Care in trying to assess the impact of…

Abstract

This article highlights challenges faced by researchers in the Department of Health's programme of research on Modernising Adult Social Care in trying to assess the impact of reform on service users. It explores the changing relationship between service users and service providers, focusing in particular on the author's own research as part of an ESRC/AHRB‐funded project on Creating citizenconsumers: changing relationships and identifications. Rather than a one‐way relationship between policy reform and user impact, the article highlights the importance of bringing users into the research process itself.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2023

Lia Blaj-Ward

The introductory chapter in the volume offers a rationale for bringing together, in an edited collection, contributions from authors who emphasize the continued relevance of…

Abstract

The introductory chapter in the volume offers a rationale for bringing together, in an edited collection, contributions from authors who emphasize the continued relevance of mentoring in academia. The focus of mentoring in the volume is on enabling academics to orient their practice towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); the introduction highlights the selection of SDGs discussed, as well as critically reflective responses to these in existing literature. The structure of the volume and of individual chapters is mapped for the benefit of readers. The volume is a hybrid text, combining academic scholarly reflection with narrative vignettes and with dialogue excerpts, to illustrate more fully SDG-oriented mentoring practices and experiences. The principles underpinning the writing methodology and the sources which have helped shape these principles are discussed here. As well as unpacking the writing methodology, the introductory chapter spotlights three core texts on mentoring which informed the volume at proposal stage and throughout the writing process. A personal note on mentoring from the volume editor is followed by a ‘pause and reflect’ section, which offers questions for the reader to consider when engaging with some or all the chapters in the volume.

Details

Mentoring Within and Beyond Academia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83797-565-5

Keywords

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