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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Rebecca Lancaster and Elizabeth Burtney

Mental ill‐health in the workplace is estimated to cost UK employers £6.2b each year in lost working days. This concern to employers and employees alike was recently…

327

Abstract

Mental ill‐health in the workplace is estimated to cost UK employers £6.2b each year in lost working days. This concern to employers and employees alike was recently highlighted by the Health Education Board for Scotland (HEBS) needs assessment study of workplace health promotion, which identified stress as a major issue. A Health and Safety Executive review (1993) of the stress literature proposed the incorporation of stress within the framework of the assessment and control cycle already introduced to minimise physical health and safety risks. This was supported by the HEBS study that identified health and safety as the predominant health‐related culture in Scottish workplaces. It is therefore appropriate to include stress control with other health and safety issues. The Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) had already developed a risk assessment approach, entitled the Organisational Stress Health Audit (OSHA), and the feasibility of this was tested in the pilot study commissioned by HEBS. This paper presents the background to this organisational approach, its feasibility in controlling stress across different types of organisation and future plans for development of the approach. The views presented are those of the researchers and not the commissioning body.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Elizabeth Burtney and Michael Ross

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Elizabeth Parker

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Mike Dent and Elizabeth Burtney

Considers the impact of recent government policy on the organization of primary care in England and Wales. Discusses the notion and practice of “teamworking” currently in…

1727

Abstract

Considers the impact of recent government policy on the organization of primary care in England and Wales. Discusses the notion and practice of “teamworking” currently in vogue, and analyses implications for doctors, nurses and managers working in/attached to general practices. Draws on the findings of a study of primary care team building which took place in a UK health authority (here referred to as “Weston”), and focuses on the experiences of four general practices as they have attempted to develop as multidisciplinary partnerships. Gives consideration to the “new managerialism” evident in the NHS and its attempt to redefine professionalism and professional autonomy.

Details

Health Manpower Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Andrea Wigfield, Katy Wright, Elizabeth Burtney and Diane Buddery

The purpose of this paper is to look at the implications of the increasing use of Assisted Living Technology in the social care sector and to assess the implications for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at the implications of the increasing use of Assisted Living Technology in the social care sector and to assess the implications for the workforce in terms of job roles, skills, knowledge, training, and support.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was used, through a quantitative electronic survey of staff working in social care (as well as some health care) organisations in England, and three qualitative case studies of local authorities.

Findings

The research shows that the organisations involved in delivering Assisted Living Technology, the types of Assisted Living Technology being introduced, and the way in which it is being delivered, have implications for job roles and the skills and knowledge needed by staff. The associated training and workforce development similarly varies across the social care sector; it is ad hoc, disparate, and provided primarily by individual employers or by suppliers and manufacturers.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for a standardised Assisted Living Technology workforce development approach which can be used across the social care sector.

Practical implications

The varied nature of Assisted Living Technology providers and delivery models presents a challenge to the development and implementation of a standardised programme of workforce development.

Originality/value

This paper presents the results of new empirical research arising from a quantitative and qualitative study of the workforce development implications of Assisted Living Technology in the English social care sector.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Chris Abbott

125

Abstract

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Michael Murray

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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