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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Elizabeth Breeze, Nicola Jean Hart, Dag Aarsland, Catherine Moody and Carol Brayne

– The purpose of this paper is to scope potential and gaps in European cohort studies with focus on brain ageing and neurodegeneration.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to scope potential and gaps in European cohort studies with focus on brain ageing and neurodegeneration.

Design/methodology/approach

Combined and augmented two scoping exercises conducted for European Union Joint Programme on Neurodegenerative Diseases (JPND) and the Alzheimer Society UK.

Findings

In total, 106 cohorts initially identified with a further 52 found on second sweep. Strengths include gender balance, diversity of measures and much detail on health and health behaviours, and lifecourse representation. Major gaps identified were the oldest old, non-Caucasians, people in Eastern Europe, migrant populations, rural residents and people in long-term care. Quality of life, psychosocial and environmental factors were limited. Relatively few cohorts are population representative. Analytical methods for combining studies and longitudinal analysis require careful consideration.

Research limitations/implications

European studies and published information only.

Practical implications

Collaboration across disciplines and studies, greater dissemination of methods and findings will improve knowledge about cognitive and functional decline in current and future older populations.

Social implications

Better understanding of brain ageing and the dementia syndrome will improve investment decisions for primary, secondary and tertiary prevention.

Originality/value

Building on the work of JPND and the Alzheimer Society is the first study of the scope and limitations of current cohorts in Europe. It is designed to help researchers and policy makers in their planning.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Alan Walker

The purpose of this article is to introduce the ESRC's Growing Older Programme and to outline some of the challenges it is facing. I will also put the Programme in context so that…

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to introduce the ESRC's Growing Older Programme and to outline some of the challenges it is facing. I will also put the Programme in context so that its aims, ambitions and potential can be understood. The article opens with a few words about the demographic pressures that overarch this programme and which were influential in its conception.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

532

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Article
Publication date: 22 July 2019

Jacob A. Massoud, David M. Boje, Elizabeth Capener and Marilu Marcillo

This paper aims to offer an analysis of the British Petroleum (BP) Prudhoe Bay environmental disaster. The primary purpose is to elucidate the fivefold of antenarrative in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer an analysis of the British Petroleum (BP) Prudhoe Bay environmental disaster. The primary purpose is to elucidate the fivefold of antenarrative in sensemaking environmental accidents. The analytic framework enables organization to envision futures where they want to be, and work to get there as more socially responsible companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an intertextual analysis of texts by ascribing voice and affiliation to each antenarrative. The multiple voices and antenarratives quoted within the texts were compared and coded and theme analysis was conducted over time to understand dynamics and see if organizational learning was occurring.

Findings

The antenarrative method generated several findings: BP is faulty beneath in how they conceive of safety, lacking foresight. BP executives leave out elements of safety, a fore having that does not include what needs to be prepared for. BP foretells that it is socially responsible, yet the reality of events seems contradictory. Within fore structure, some of BP’s leaders deny or ignore claims of critics through intertextual connections of events. By fore caring, BP mediates the problem in response to the disaster and critics. Their sensemaking in this case is more retrospective and reactive than prospective.

Practical implications

Organizations can avoid environmental disasters and negative backlash by adopting practices that provide more transparent discourse and greater accountability. The fivefold of antenarrative serves as a storytelling framework to promote care by using trial and error problem solving on future bets.

Originality/value

To date, few intertextual analyses have been performed to study organizations. By applying a fivefold antenarrative storytelling framework, which reflects new advances in storytelling theory, the authors offer an original perspective on environmental accident sensemaking.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Susan E. Cooperstein and Elizabeth Kocevar‐Weidinger

Guided by four principles – learners construct their own meaning; new learning builds on prior knowledge; learning is enhanced by social interaction; and learning develops through…

16560

Abstract

Guided by four principles – learners construct their own meaning; new learning builds on prior knowledge; learning is enhanced by social interaction; and learning develops through “authentic” tasks – constructivist learning moves from experience to knowledge and not the other way around. In a constructivist classroom, the activities lead to the concepts; the students construct the meanings. Learning happens! Abstract concepts become meaningful, transferable, and retained because they are attached to the performance of a concrete activity. This article discusses the elements of constructive learning and describes ways to apply those elements to library instruction to create truly “active” learning. An appendix contains sample exercises.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 April 2016

Claudia S. P. Fernandez, Cheryl C. Noble, Elizabeth T. Jensen, Linda Martin and Marshall Stewart

The Food Systems Leadership Institute (FSLI) is a 2-year leadership development program consisting of 3 intensive in-person immersion retreats, and a robust and customizable…

Abstract

The Food Systems Leadership Institute (FSLI) is a 2-year leadership development program consisting of 3 intensive in-person immersion retreats, and a robust and customizable distance-based program. Participants come primarily from land-grant and public universities and learn about personal, organizational and system leadership with a focus on food systems as an organizing theme. For this study, program graduates from FSLI Cohorts 4-6 (n=60) were asked to complete an online retrospective pre- and post-test of skill competency and skill use for 20 competencies addressed in the program, with 47 (78%) completing the survey. Data indicate participants’ ratings of skill competency increased significantly across all 20 targeted areas.Participants further noted that they used these skills more after completing the program as compared to prior to the Fellowship training. Data suggest the FSLI model of leadership development can have a significant impact on participants’ perceived skill level in and use of important skills in both personal and organizational leadership in academic and food system settings.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1975

Barbara Brill

MY MAIDEN NAME was Lamb and this, I think, was the tenuous thread that first drew me towards Charles Lamb when I was in my teens. His letters and essays were compulsory reading at…

Abstract

MY MAIDEN NAME was Lamb and this, I think, was the tenuous thread that first drew me towards Charles Lamb when I was in my teens. His letters and essays were compulsory reading at school as a background study to the Romantic poets. My heart warmed to Lamb because of the revelation of his personality in his writings and for the glimpses he gave of his contemporaries, seeming to welcome the reader into the charmed circle of his friends. If I had been restricted to a classroom study of the Tales from Shakespeare, with which his name is first associated in the minds of many readers, I might never have gone on to discover the warmth of his humanity and the sparkle of his humour that glow from his letters and essays. In this year of the 200th anniversary of his birth I hope that many readers will turn back to these writings to renew acquaintance with Charles Lamb as I have done and find the same endearing qualities that won my affection in adolescence.

Details

Library Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Alan Walker and Kristiina Martimo

This article focuses on researching quality of life in old age. Based on a review of the relevant literature, it argues that research has not reflected sufficiently the…

704

Abstract

This article focuses on researching quality of life in old age. Based on a review of the relevant literature, it argues that research has not reflected sufficiently the multifaceted nature of quality of life and has relied too much on the judgements of professionals rather than older people. It concludes that quality of life research in general has under‐emphasised the importance of material factors in people's lives. With regard to older people, research shows that relatively poor quality of life, as reported by older people themselves, is associated with only a minority and, among this minority, twice the proportion of older women to men. The article ends with an outline of the new Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Growing Older Research Programme on Extending Quality Life, which in three years time promises to provide usable information for policy makers and practitioners about the determinants of quality of life in old age.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1902

THE credulity of enthusiasm was never better exemplified than in the case of John Dee. Here we have a man almost typical of Elizabethan England: necromancer, seer, alchemist…

Abstract

THE credulity of enthusiasm was never better exemplified than in the case of John Dee. Here we have a man almost typical of Elizabethan England: necromancer, seer, alchemist, mathematician, and lastly, instead of firstly, natural philosopher. It was the age of portents, of abnormalities made normal, of magicians, of the powers of good and evil, of the striving after the unknown whilst the knowable was persistently overlooked. Swift sums up these philosophers in “Gulliver's Travels,” and two centuries earlier Erasmus in his “Praise of Folly” notes them. “Next come the philosophers,” he writes, “who esteem themselves the only favourites of wisdom; they build castles in the air, and infinite worlds in a vacuum. They'll give you to a hair's breadth the dimensions of the sun, when indeed they are unable to construe the mechanism of their own body: yet they spy out ideas, universals, separate forms, first matters, quiddities, formalities, and keep correspondence with the stars.” Such was John Dee, a compound of boundless enthusiasm and boundless credulity. There is nothing abnormal about him, for he is to be judged by the age in which he lived. His belief in witchcraft and intercourse with spirits was shared by all the men of his time save the abnormal Reginald Scott, whose famous “Discovery of Witchcraft” produced James the First's impassioned reply.

Details

New Library World, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Jocelyne Kenny, Ian Asquith, Reinhard Guss, Elizabeth Field, Lewis Slade, Alexandra Bone, Keith Oliver, Mark Jones, Chris Ryan, Melvyn Brooks and Chris Norris

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how service user involvement for people living with a diagnosis of dementia can contribute to innovate ways of training and educating a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how service user involvement for people living with a diagnosis of dementia can contribute to innovate ways of training and educating a skilled healthcare workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study approach, including interviews observations and reflections from facilitators and members of a service user group for people living with dementia in a recovery-based older adult service in East Kent, UK. In total, 11 people were involved in this study: five people are living with a diagnosis of dementia, two are clinical psychologists, two are trainee clinical psychologists and two are placement year psychology undergraduates.

Findings

The paper shows how service user involvement groups can enable people with dementia to train a wide range of healthcare professionals in different areas, from the perspective of people living with dementia and healthcare professionals. It also reflects on the challenges that can arise through working with patients in a more collegiate way.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that people with dementia can be involved in the training of healthcare professionals in innovative ways. It therefore suggests new ways of working with people with dementia to develop staff skills.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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