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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Elizabeth Berber and Harm Boer

In recent years there has been growing interest in the fate of those women with mental disorder who come into contact with the criminal justice system. This interest has…

Abstract

In recent years there has been growing interest in the fate of those women with mental disorder who come into contact with the criminal justice system. This interest has stemmed from growing recognition that traditional forensic services could not offer the appropriate care required by this group in a conventional mixed‐gender environment. Women‐only services have begun to be developed in generic psychiatric settings, spurred on by the national service framework (NSF) which set a time limit for the development of segregated in‐patient facilities. Forensic services for those with learning disability have been slower to take up the challenge of how best to place women with learning disability who offend and require an in‐patient secure environment. This article describes how one such service attempted to rise to this challenge and build a service for this often neglected group

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Hannelore B. Rader

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with orientation to library facilities and services, instruction in the use of information resources, and computer…

Abstract

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with orientation to library facilities and services, instruction in the use of information resources, and computer skills related to information gathering. This is RSR's twelfth annual review of this literature and lists items published in 1985. A few references are not annotated because the compiler could not obtain copies of them for the review.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Dawn Chatty

The populations of the Middle East have experienced particularly rapid socio‐economic change over the past 40 years, due largely to the consolidation of the nation‐state…

1006

Abstract

The populations of the Middle East have experienced particularly rapid socio‐economic change over the past 40 years, due largely to the consolidation of the nation‐state after the break‐up of the Ottoman Empire at the close of WWI. The basic social, political and cultural rights of the pastoral populations (the Bedouin) of this region have been largely ignored, however, in part due to their remoteness and inaccessibility, but also because of the very fact of their mobility and physical marginality. With a few exceptions ‐ such as Jordan and Saudi Arabia ‐ cultural differences between the mobile Bedouin and the settled urban and agrarian populations have translated over time into development of discriminated minorities. The Bedouin way of life has come to be regarded as backward and primitive; in some places their very authenticity as part of the nation‐state has been questioned as they fail to ‘Modernise’ at the same pace as surrounding populations. Thus in Lebanon the majority of Bedouin are ‘stateless’ without papers and live beyond the ‘boundaries’ of government services. Their mobile way of life is largely a thing of the past, but their sense of tribal belonging remains strong. Their desire for nationality papers reflects a wish to end their marginalisation and statelessness and be able to access government services.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Neringa Kalpokas and Ivana Radivojevic

The purpose of this paper is to expand understanding of how leaders can use their power to reshape macro-level structures to foster individuals' freedoms and build more…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand understanding of how leaders can use their power to reshape macro-level structures to foster individuals' freedoms and build more democratic workplaces. The importance of freedom in work and life can hardly be argued with, yet current democracy scores are the lowest that have ever been recorded (Economist Intelligence Unit, 2019).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed two cases of successful democratization, Spain and Lithuania, where they conducted a total of 65 semi-structured interviews with different actors including the top leaders themselves. A combined inductive-deductive analysis of the in-depth qualitative data highlighted how using different dimensions of power (French and Raven, 1959) related to distributing power to others.

Findings

These findings extend understanding of how leaders can use their power to effectively distribute power to others and reach a democracy that fosters freedom. Information and referent power were crucial for aligning the different stakeholder groups, expert power emerged as key for building and empowering a network of support and legitimate power was essential for fostering peaceful and long-lasting changes toward democracy.

Originality/value

While previous research has recognized the importance of leadership and politics for instigating macro-level changes, this study specifies how leaders can utilize their different sources of power to bring greater power and freedom to individuals by unpacking the unique impacts of each type of power. This study thus provides practical insights for leaders seeking to establish more democratic workplaces.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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