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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Michelle Heyman, Megan Ledoux Galligan, Giselle Berenice Salinas, Elizabeth Baker, Jan Blacher and Katherine Stavropoulos

Professionals working with community populations are often presented with complicated cases where it is difficult to determine which diagnosis or diagnoses are appropriate…

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Abstract

Purpose

Professionals working with community populations are often presented with complicated cases where it is difficult to determine which diagnosis or diagnoses are appropriate. Differentiating among neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability can be a complex process, especially, as these disorders have some overlapping symptoms and often co-occur in young children. This series of case studies aims to present commonly overlapping symptoms in children who present to clinics with developmental concerns.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents three case studies that were completed at a free community ASD screening clinic in Southern California.

Findings

The case studies have common presenting behaviors and symptoms (e.g. social communication difficulties) that often co-occur across diagnoses; explanations for the final diagnoses are given in each case.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions from these three cases cannot generalize to all children being seen in clinics for neurodevelopmental concerns.

Practical implications

This series of case studies highlights commonly overlapping symptoms in children who present for differential diagnosis with social and/or behavioral concerns. Implications for educational placement and intervention are discussed.

Social implications

These cases highlight the challenges involved in the differential and dual diagnostic process for young children with developmental concerns. Diagnostic considerations can affect later educational placement and opportunities for socialization.

Originality/value

This series of case studies provide practical information for clinicians about how to effectively differentiate between commonly occurring neurodevelopmental disorders, particularly given recent changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-5).

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2022

Fred Niederman and Elizabeth White Baker

This to show how critical success factors (CSFs) from practitioner-oriented research can be tested and used to generate new theory.

Abstract

Purpose

This to show how critical success factors (CSFs) from practitioner-oriented research can be tested and used to generate new theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an extended example regarding the integration of IT departments following organizational mergers and acquisitions to illustrate in proof of concept that such practitioner-oriented research can generate new substantive theory and be used to begin a cycle of representation-testing leading to enhancing domain knowledge. The method used consists of the identification of an exemplary practitioner-oriented research article, restatement of CSFs into testable propositions, gathering data through interviews with phenomenon participants, analyzing and interpreting data relative to these CSFs, then presenting the results pertaining to these CSFs and observations from examining them holistically.

Findings

No CSFs were affirmed in all cases, neither were they rejected in all cases. The pattern of answers reveals a significant difference between factors representing general management best practices and technical practices. The higher frequency among management factors shows a relative universality to these items, whereas the technical issues are noted less frequently as they each apply to smaller subsets of all post mergers and acquisitions integrations but remain critical when they do apply. This set of responses suggests that the frequency of responses does not indicate the importance of any given factor across settings.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests (1) CSFs, while generally helpful, can also be misleading when applied such that, where of potential importance, they can be brought into a theorizing mode for refinement and extraction of additional knowledge; (2) that CSFs can be sorted into those tending toward general management principles that apply most frequently in contrast to those of critical importance but applicable across fewer situations; and (3) that as a proof of concept the case to theory transformation method can work to introduce heuristic knowledge into a process-initiating theorizing, raising prospects for subsequent continued improvement.

Practical implications

Assuming robust reporting of CSFs in well-conducted cases, this study knows that at least in one setting these factors were important in achieving particular results. However, this study does not know, without subsequent testing and theorizing, whether the factor applies across circumstances and whether it requires particular handling (e.g. timing may be critical but relies on varied conditions to indicate when actions need be taken). By theorizing based upon CSFs for important IS phenomena, the authors create a bridge between knowledge as used in practice and the scientific tools for increasing its value over time.

Originality/value

Although the authors know of case and multiple case studies surfacing best practices in post mergers and acquisitions integrations, they know of no broad studies across numerous organizations; they also know of no studies demonstrating the relationship of management and technical CSFs in an IS phenomenon. Further, although there are other techniques advocated for theory initiation and building, the authors know of none that transforms heuristic or anecdotal knowledge for subsequent theorizing and continual improvement at a more detailed level than mid-range theory.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Garry D. Carnegie and Stephen P. Walker

The purpose of this paper is to extend the work of Carnegie and Walker and report the results of Part 2 of their study on household accounting in Australia during the period from…

2749

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the work of Carnegie and Walker and report the results of Part 2 of their study on household accounting in Australia during the period from the 1820s to the 1960s.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a microhistorical approach involving a detailed examination of actual accounting practices in the Australian home based on 18 sets of surviving household records identified as exemplars and supplemented by other sources which permit their contextualisation and interpretation.

Findings

The findings point to considerable variety in the accounting practices pursued by individuals and families. Household accounting in Australia was undertaken by both women and men of the middle and landed classes whose surviving household accounts were generally found to comprise one element of diverse and comprehensive personal record keeping systems. The findings indicate points of convergence and divergence in relation to the contemporary prescriptive literature and practice.

Originality/value

The paper reflects on the implications of the findings for the notion of the household as a unit of consumption as opposed to production, gender differences in accounting practice and financial responsibility, the relationship between changes in the life course and the commencement and cessation of household accounting, and the relationship between domestic accounting practice and social class.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1982

Liz Chapman, Elizabeth Baker, Peter H Mann, WA Munford and AGK Leonard

‘WHAT A novel arrangement. Is any reason given?’

Abstract

‘WHAT A novel arrangement. Is any reason given?’

Details

New Library World, vol. 83 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 29 April 2019

Elizabeth Baker

Mission statements are used for a variety of reasons in organizations, including defining the purpose of the institution, communicating with its stakeholders, shaping its…

Abstract

Mission statements are used for a variety of reasons in organizations, including defining the purpose of the institution, communicating with its stakeholders, shaping its strategic planning process, providing a realistic snapshot of its everyday work, and outlining its future goals or objectives (among many others). For many academic libraries, mission statements are used to showcase resources, services, technologies, and innovations. The purpose of this study is to examine the mission statements of libraries that have won the ACRL Excellence in Libraries Award and analyze whether (or not) the winning libraries used innovation to create a distinct environment that was reflected through their mission statements. The study uses the work of Pearce and David (1987) to determine what elements are included in the mission statements. This chapter utilizes qualitative methodology in the study.

Pearce and David (1987) outline eight elements found in mission statements: target customer; principal products/services; geographic domain; core technologies; survival, growth, or profit; company philosophy; self-concept; and public image. This qualitative study finds that the mission statements of the academic libraries collectively included seven of the elements, omitting survival, growth, or profit universally. Also, the inclusion of these elements allows many of the libraries to create their unique description, unveiling a commitment to innovation.

As an original research study, this chapter adds a unique perspective to the concept of innovation in academic libraries, particularly as it examines the mission statements of award-winning libraries to determine if innovation is found in these foundational documents.

Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2015

Elizabeth Baker

In the workplace, the aim of positive organizational behavior (POB) is to promote the strengths and proficiencies of the institution’s human capital in the belief that doing so…

Abstract

In the workplace, the aim of positive organizational behavior (POB) is to promote the strengths and proficiencies of the institution’s human capital in the belief that doing so increases work productivity and boosts employee morale while decreasing stress and employee burnout. POB, incorporating the tenets of positive psychology within its framework, emphasizes that the psychological states of self-efficacy, hope, optimism, and resiliency are able to be quantified, improved, and controlled. The purpose of this chapter is to introduce the concept of POB, to explore its impact on leadership development (particularly by examining the authentic leadership model), to discuss its human resource development (HRD) applications in the workplace, and to apply the POB concept to academic and public library directors with the aim of producing a better working environment for all library staff. A conceptual approach is employed throughout the chapter to provide a theoretical analysis of how the POB concept could be utilized by library administrators. Using a variety of tools such as modeling, coaching, and rewarding innovation to produce the desired behaviors in subordinates, administrators can help to create an organizational climate within their institutions that values positivity over negativity. As a recently emerged phenomenon, POB is still developing, producing two important concepts on its own, namely authentic leadership and psychological capital, which have not been applied to the library profession. This chapter adds a unique perspective to the growing POB literature.

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Elizabeth White Baker, Said S. Al‐Gahtani and Geoffrey S. Hubona

This paper aims to investigate the effects of gender, age and education on new technology implementation in Saudi Arabia, a technologically developing country, using the Theory of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effects of gender, age and education on new technology implementation in Saudi Arabia, a technologically developing country, using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB).

Design/methodology/approach

The research was an empirical investigation based on surveys completed by 1,088 Saudi knowledge workers.

Findings

The TPB model performs well in Saudi Arabia. This validation accounts for 37 percent of the variance in behavioral intention among Saudi knowledge workers. For the moderator variables, there were no statistically significant interactions, with the exception of the moderation of perceived behavioral control on behavioral intention by level of education.

Research limitations/implications

Saudi Arabia is an exemplar for many developing nations characterized by distinct intellectual and cultural traditions that differ from Western cultures. Demographic variables (e.g. gender and age) that have been reported to be significant moderators of the influences of attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control on behavioral intention in other cultural samples were found to be non‐significant in this Saudi Arabian sample.

Practical implications

System developers using user‐centered design approaches have different design criteria for the successful workforce adoption of information technology (IT) systems in a technologically developing nation, as compared to the workforce of a technologically developed nation.

Originality/value

This paper validates TPB as a multi‐cultural model for investigating the impact of attitudes, beliefs, and subjective norms on technology adoption, and, in contrast to previous studies, indicates the (non)effects of select demographic moderators on the model using a non‐Western sample.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1938

OUR various accounts of the Portsmouth Conference, and the official record of it which is now in the hands of readers shows that it may be regarded as a successful one. It was…

Abstract

OUR various accounts of the Portsmouth Conference, and the official record of it which is now in the hands of readers shows that it may be regarded as a successful one. It was specially notable for the absence of those bickerings and differences which must inevitably come to the surface at times. There may be something in the suggestion of one of our writers that the weather was a main factor. However that may be, there was uniform good temper, and we came away with the belief that a good week's work for librarianship had been done.

Details

New Library World, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2015

Abstract

Details

Library Staffing for the Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-499-7

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2015

Abstract

Details

Library Staffing for the Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-499-7

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