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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Eric T. Anderson, Abraham Daniel, Elizabeth L. Anderson and Gus Santaella

Robert Davidson, pricing manager for Tupelo Medical, was concerned about the variability in price paid for its top-selling product, the Micron 8 Series blood pressure…

Abstract

Robert Davidson, pricing manager for Tupelo Medical, was concerned about the variability in price paid for its top-selling product, the Micron 8 Series blood pressure monitoring system. Using historical transaction data, Davidson must determine the appropriate price floor. Setting a price too high risked the loss of a large number of customers, putting the company at substantial risk due to the importance of the product. Setting a price too low would impact Davidson's ability to meet the stated objective of increasing margins by 3 percent. He wondered what the optimal price floor would be and what the expected profits would be for that new price floor. Additionally, the company's business varied considerably by geographic region, account size and account type. As a result, he needed to consider whether it made sense to set a single price floor or whether he could improve profits by allowing some variability in the price floor by customer segment.

  • To illustrate how one can build a data-driven pricing model to study the tradeoff between margin and probability of winning a sale in a B2B market

  • To quantify the value from implementing a price floor with a B2B sales force

  • To demonstrate the incremental value of implementing a price floor that varies by customer segment.

To illustrate how one can build a data-driven pricing model to study the tradeoff between margin and probability of winning a sale in a B2B market

To quantify the value from implementing a price floor with a B2B sales force

To demonstrate the incremental value of implementing a price floor that varies by customer segment.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Eric T. Anderson and Elizabeth Anderson

From 2002 to 2011, coffee-machine manufacturer Keurig Incorporated had grown from a privately held company with just over $20 million in revenues and a plan to enter the…

Abstract

From 2002 to 2011, coffee-machine manufacturer Keurig Incorporated had grown from a privately held company with just over $20 million in revenues and a plan to enter the single serve coffee arena for home consumers, to a wholly owned subsidiary of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc., a publicly traded company with net revenues of $1.36 billion and a market capitalization of between $8 and $9 billion. In 2003 Keurig had introduced its first At Home brewer. Now, approximately 25 percent of all coffee makers sold in the United States were Keurig-branded machines, and Keurig was recognized as among the leaders in the marketplace. The company had just concluded agreements with both Dunkin' Donuts and Starbucks that would make these retailers' coffee available for use with Keurig's specialized brewing system. The company faced far different challenges than when it was a small, unknown marketplace entrant. John Whoriskey, vice president and general manager of Keurig's At Home division, had to consider the impact that impending expiration of key technology patents and the perceived environmental impact of the K-Cup® portion packs would have on the company's growth. Whoriskey also wondered what Keurig's growth potential was, and how the new arrangements with Starbucks and Dunkin' Donuts could be leveraged to achieve it.

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Jane Currie, Jane Mateer, Damien Weston, Elizabeth Anderson and Jackson Harding

In 2012, Headquarters 17 Combat Service Support Brigade (HQ 17 CSS Bde) implemented a clinical governance framework. The framework is intended as a quality improvement…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2012, Headquarters 17 Combat Service Support Brigade (HQ 17 CSS Bde) implemented a clinical governance framework. The framework is intended as a quality improvement tool through which excellence in deployed healthcare is achieved. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of this clinical governance framework to 17 CSS Bde and present feedback provided by users on their application of the clinical governance framework.

Design/methodology/approach

An electronic survey was disseminated to the four 17 CSS Bde deployable health battalions (n=1,061). Qualitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative data using thematic analysis.

Findings

In total, there were 105 responses providing valid data for analysis. The data identified mixed understanding and awareness of clinical governance amongst participants, and pinpointed aspects of the framework that needed refinement.

Practical implications

The results highlight important challenges implementing a clinical governance framework for deployable health units. The authors propose embedding clinical governance education in all army soldier and officer health courses to remedy deficits in knowledge and understanding. Recommendations for further development of the clinical governance framework are also made with particular emphasis on education, clinical risk and clinical evaluation.

Originality/value

This paper offers unique insight into the implementation of a clinical governance framework to the 17 CSS Bde, Australian Army. The results suggest that levels of understanding and awareness of clinical governance are stalling its translation through the military hierarchy. The data identify that implementation of a clinical governance framework is not easy, even within a military environment where the culture is to follow orders and obey the chain of command.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1939

Liverpool Conference was amongst the largest, as it was amongst the most successful, of recent years. In all but the weather it excelled, and there were fine intervals…

Abstract

Liverpool Conference was amongst the largest, as it was amongst the most successful, of recent years. In all but the weather it excelled, and there were fine intervals even in that. We publish the “Letters on our Affairs” by our well known correspondent, Callimachus, so far as it covers the first three days; the conclusion will follow next month, with what futcher comments seem to be necessary. The Annual Business Meeting was a little less rowdy than that at Scarborough, but one thing emerged from it and that was the determination of the A.A.L. to survive independently. There is more in this than meets the eye, and discussion on it may be postponed until a calmer mood prevails on all sides.

Details

New Library World, vol. 41 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Dell Champlin

Corporate restructuring has had a profound impact on the US economy. While the problems of restructuring have been discussed in great detail, the solutions are elusive…

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Abstract

Corporate restructuring has had a profound impact on the US economy. While the problems of restructuring have been discussed in great detail, the solutions are elusive. What can or should be done to mitigate the impacts of restructuring on workers, communities, and society at large? The stumbling‐block to finding an answer to this question is the lack of a satisfactory ethical framework for evaluating restructuring decisions. The purpose of this essay is to develop such a framework. The first part of the paper reviews the ethical guidance provided by the standard theory of the firm. The second part explores an alternative framework based on the work of Elizabeth Anderson. Her “expressive theory of rational action” offers a more promising framework for evaluating management decisions with significant costs to society.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Abstract

Details

‘Purpose-built’ Art in Hospitals: Art with Intent
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-681-5

Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Deborah Jaffé

Purpose – To discover and unravel the contribution of women to innovation and invention. This chapter builds upon a book published in 2003, called, Ingenious Women. The…

Abstract

Purpose – To discover and unravel the contribution of women to innovation and invention. This chapter builds upon a book published in 2003, called, Ingenious Women. The purpose of the book was to discover the invisible women inventors and patent holders operating between 1637, when the first patent was awarded to a woman, and the outbreak of war in 1914. For the purpose of this essay, the time frame has been extended to the present.

Methodology – Historical patents are used as the main research base, supported by searches of other relevant databases, directories and specialist archives (census records, registered designs, company records, museum collections) as well as specialist literature.

Findings – The research illustrates that women and men were often part of a wide network of discoverers and innovators and were able, by using the latest technologies and materials available, to resolve problems both large and small.

Research limitations/implications – This categorisation on patent databases or directories and searches were by female first names or by object type. his categorisation highlights the historical assumption that women are not inventors. Although this search method highlighted hundreds of women, there must be many still undiscovered.

Practical implications – Not all the ideas went into production and some have now become obsolete. Others continue to be produced and have formed the basis of successful companies. Many women became entrepreneurs and developed businesses based on their inventions and some, as widows, successfully ran their deceased husbands' companies.

Social implication – The women in this hidden history often had to navigate a path through social attitudes and legislative frameworks. They are all an example to women today that anyone, regardless of gender, can be innovative and entrepreneurial. What is crucial is that the ideas being developed are unique and have a purpose.

Details

Innovating Women: Contributions to Technological Advancement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-335-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Elizabeth A. Anderson

Evaluates the service quality of four clinics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center using a questionnaire methodology. The SERVQUAL instrument was…

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Abstract

Evaluates the service quality of four clinics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center using a questionnaire methodology. The SERVQUAL instrument was administered to patients of the Medical Breast, Leukemia, Medical Gastroenterology and Bone Marrow Aspiration clinics. Results show that, according to the service gap methodology of comparing expectations and perceptions across all four clinics, the issues of billing accuracy and waiting times are deemed by patients as significant problems. In comparing the individual clinics, the Medical Gastroenterology and Leukemia clinics are best performers and the Medical Breast clinic is the worst. However, these differences in performance are due to differences in patients’ expectations of service quality, rather than differences in perceptions. Concludes that customer expectations can have a strong impact on a firm’s evaluation of its service quality.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Garry D. Carnegie and Stephen P. Walker

The purpose of this paper is to extend the work of Carnegie and Walker and report the results of Part 2 of their study on household accounting in Australia during the…

2655

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the work of Carnegie and Walker and report the results of Part 2 of their study on household accounting in Australia during the period from the 1820s to the 1960s.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a microhistorical approach involving a detailed examination of actual accounting practices in the Australian home based on 18 sets of surviving household records identified as exemplars and supplemented by other sources which permit their contextualisation and interpretation.

Findings

The findings point to considerable variety in the accounting practices pursued by individuals and families. Household accounting in Australia was undertaken by both women and men of the middle and landed classes whose surviving household accounts were generally found to comprise one element of diverse and comprehensive personal record keeping systems. The findings indicate points of convergence and divergence in relation to the contemporary prescriptive literature and practice.

Originality/value

The paper reflects on the implications of the findings for the notion of the household as a unit of consumption as opposed to production, gender differences in accounting practice and financial responsibility, the relationship between changes in the life course and the commencement and cessation of household accounting, and the relationship between domestic accounting practice and social class.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Elizabeth Anderson

Women's identity in medicine has always been in existence within the home and community. Recognition of this needs to be developed. The changing and fluctuating position…

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Abstract

Women's identity in medicine has always been in existence within the home and community. Recognition of this needs to be developed. The changing and fluctuating position of women in medicine, from medicine as the prerogative of women to claims that women herbalists were witches, is discussed. Throughout history women's identity in medicine is complex and multidimensional and has never been static.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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