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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Udo Müller, Gilbert Ahamer, Holger Peters, Elisabeth Weinke, Norbert Sapper and Elvira Salcher

The purpose of this publication is to present a didactic concept with the targeted impact of a positive future vision. This paper reflects the effect of local educational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this publication is to present a didactic concept with the targeted impact of a positive future vision. This paper reflects the effect of local educational action on the development of regionally optimised visions in rural regions of a European industrial state, compared with a rural region in the developing country of Senegal.

Design/methodology/approach

An assessment and analysis of two conceptual approaches to education and technology is conducted with a view to participating in a future multicultural participatory design process, and identifying the chances that communities have to build future‐oriented structures that support local roots and development.

Findings

In the short‐term, the technological and material results are the targeted localisation of a windmill in the (physical and cultural) countryside. In the long‐term, educative and social results are expected to strengthen local civil society, which is initiated by empowering students through their self‐responsibility in the Alpine region of Greifenburg, Austria. The “windmill” in the region is a publicly visible sign and a technology‐based icon in the landscape, based on local consensus on several levels and inspiring further regional consensus on energy, climate protection and its active creation through entrepreneurship in civil society.

Originality/value

Technology serves as a catalyst to trigger social cohesion among multiple cultures in a region and to enhance conviviality.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 7 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Lena Bader, Tabea Bereuther, Elisabeth Deutsch, Julia Edlinger, Silvia Füreder, Emanuel Kaspar, Marlene Köttstorfer, Claudia Mautner, Christine Rossegger, Alina Samonig, Stefan Samonig, Christoph Schuster, Gerhard Witz, Victoria Zotter and Gilbert Ahamer

Based on an in‐depth comparison of 20 multicultural university curricula, this article aims to provide practical and implementable suggestions about how to improve such…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on an in‐depth comparison of 20 multicultural university curricula, this article aims to provide practical and implementable suggestions about how to improve such curricula in order to ensure highest and globally compatible academic quality. The recently founded developmental Master's curriculum “Global Studies” (GS) at the University of Graz, Austria serves as a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an academic web‐based process of authoring and reviewing, over a dozen students and practitioners in Global Studies have compiled this analysis. Such an approach shows that education technologies significantly enhance peer‐oriented scientific culture. Further networking among universities from every continent, and their students, is also facilitated.

Findings

Analyses conducted by over 50 contributors during 2010‐2013 show first that the Graz‐based curriculum has achieved international quality standards by spanning multiple faculties, disciplines, professional roles, and perspectives regarding globalisation. Secondly, suggestions for improvements pertaining to nine aggregated issues are provided: partner universities, semester abroad, interdisciplinarity, didactics & lectures, practicals, languages, electives, admission of students, and exams.

Practical implications

The present specific recommendations serve as valuable evidence‐based and authentic input for quality assessment procedures at Graz University, and similarly for other academic curricula elsewhere.

Social implications

Peer‐oriented higher education profits greatly from student input that has undergone an academic peer review procedure. Such quality assurance is favourably implemented via collaborative education technologies such as web platforms with discussion fora.

Originality/value

Students as the core target group in higher education institutions express their own opinion and are valued as experts and stakeholders in a genuinely democratic procedure.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 7 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

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