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Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2015

Erika Löfström, Anne Nevgi, Elisabeth Wegner and Mari Karm

In this chapter, the authors discuss the use of various kinds of images, namely photographs, drawings and verbal metaphors, as research data. These, perhaps less…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors discuss the use of various kinds of images, namely photographs, drawings and verbal metaphors, as research data. These, perhaps less conventional forms of data, have been used to identify and probe deeper into beliefs and conceptions that are closely connected with identities, but which might not be obvious to the research participants themselves. The purpose of this chapter is to provide examples of how images can be used in research, and to identify some of the features particularly pertinent or specific to the use of images. The authors draw on their own research using these forms of data in studies on teaching and learning in higher education. The authors describe key issues related to data collection and analysis, and identify challenges in these processes. They also discuss trustworthiness of images as data and dependability of interpretations in the process of analysing photographs, drawings and metaphors, and identify ethical perspectives specific to research utilising these data.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-287-0

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Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2015

Abstract

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-287-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Rommel Robertson, Christine Gockel and Elisabeth Brauner

The purpose of this paper is to examine, in two studies, whether trust in teammates and trust in management influenced transactive memory and how strongly transactive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine, in two studies, whether trust in teammates and trust in management influenced transactive memory and how strongly transactive memory, in turn, influenced perceived team performance and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via questionnaires from two samples of employees (n1=383 and n2=40). Regression and mediational analyses were employed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Trust in teammates predicted transactive memory and transactive memory, in turn, predicted perceived team performance and job satisfaction. Trust in management did not predict transactive memory, but it did predict job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Data are cross‐sectional and cannot establish cause‐effect‐relationships. Furthermore, objective performance measures could not be obtained due to the nature of the studies. Thus, future studies need to use longitudinal or experimental designs and objective performance measures.

Practical implications

Intangible factors such as trust can strengthen knowledge sharing and transactive memory systems. This, in turn, can positively impact job satisfaction and team performance. Managers and team leaders should pay more attention to building a climate of trust and participation, both within teams and between team members and supervisors/management.

Originality/value

Results of two studies show the differential effects of trust in teammates versus trust in management. For finishing a knowledge‐intensive task in a team, trust in teammates is more important than trust in management because trust influences transactive memory, which, in turn, leads to positive performance outcomes. However, for other organizational outcomes such as job satisfaction, trust in management can be as important as well.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Book part
Publication date: 11 February 2003

Abstract

Details

Effective Education for Learners with Exceptionalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-975-7

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Thomas Ellwart, Silke Bündgens and Oliver Rack

This paper aims to examine the impact of individual and group-level variables on knowledge exchange and identification in age diverse teams. From a diversity perspective…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of individual and group-level variables on knowledge exchange and identification in age diverse teams. From a diversity perspective, influences of age-related diversity perceptions and diversity beliefs (level 1) are compared with effects of objective age diversity (level 2). From a management perspective, the paper goes beyond age diversity and investigates the incremental effects of team and individual characteristics from a team learning perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire data of 516 team members and their supervisors in 73 organizational teams were analyzed in a multilevel approach.

Findings

Objective age diversity had a negative effect on knowledge exchange and identification. Beyond that, age-related diversity perceptions and positive diversity beliefs on the individual level predict the effect of objective diversity. Relativizing the impact of diversity, individual characteristics (knowing the team experts, clear understanding of goals) and team characteristics (team climate, time for knowledge exchange) explain the largest proportion of variance in the dependent variables underlining the importance of team learning variables.

Research limitations/implications

Compared to objective diversity, subjective diversity perceptions and diversity beliefs are relevant predictors of processes and attitudes in heterogenic teams.

Practical implications

There are multiple leverages for management strategies beyond the mostly fixed age diversity in teams on the individual and group level.

Originality/value

This paper evaluates the cross-level interplay between objective diversity, perceived subjective diversity and diversity beliefs and revalues the impact of HR-management in age diverse teams.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 28 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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