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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

Elisabeth R. Hayes and Elizabeth M. King

The purpose of this paper is to describe how a popular computer game, The Sims2, engages players in computing practices that are foundational to information technology (IT

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how a popular computer game, The Sims2, engages players in computing practices that are foundational to information technology (IT) fluency, and to draw implications for engaging young people, particularly girls and women, in computer‐related learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is framed within a conceptual perspective on learning as a process of acquiring situated understandings through participation in meaningful activity. The paper draws on two years of work with girls developing IT fluency through playing and modding The Sims. It also draws on interviews with adult women who are highly engaged in creating Sims content.

Findings

The paper identifies a set of practices inherent in Sims game play that are foundational to IT fluency: managing complex systems; cheating and glitching; tinkering with tools; and making, manipulating, and reasoning with spatial representations.

Practical implications

The paper suggests how existing practices associated with games might be leveraged for the development of IT fluencies.

Originality/value

This study contributes to efforts aimed at rethinking how educators might conceptualize and support the development of IT fluencies. The paper offers new perspectives on the nature of IT fluency in the context of participatory culture and productive uses of new media.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2022

Ursula Scholl-Grissemann, Mike Peters, Bernhard Fabian Bichler and Elisabeth Happ

Hiking is a popular tourism activity across the globe. Although hiking is considered a “soft” adventure activity with little risk and challenge, hikers are also confronted with…

Abstract

Purpose

Hiking is a popular tourism activity across the globe. Although hiking is considered a “soft” adventure activity with little risk and challenge, hikers are also confronted with dangerous situations where risky behavior can lead to fatalities. This study aims to understand the moderating role of hiking motives on hikers’ precautionary behavior, while providing implications for destination management organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted a 3×2 between-subjects online experiment (N = 181), manipulating the on-site information and visibility of potential hazards. Moderation analyses (SPSS PROCESS) were applied to derive the differences between the hiking motives of competitiveness/exhibitionism, playing to the limit and sociability on precautionary behavior.

Findings

The findings can inform effective hiking trail signage efforts, helping identify potential indications of risky behavior. The findings also importantly underline the moderating role of playing to the limit and competitiveness as they regard the risk perception–precautionary behavior relationship.

Originality/value

The implications of this study are directed toward destination management organizations, and how to promote precautionary hiking behavior based on hikers’ motivations.

设计/方法/途径

我们进行了一个3x2的主体间在线实验(N = 181), 操纵了现场信息和潜在危险的可见性。应用调节分析(SPSS PROCESS)得出远足动机 “竞争/展示主义"、"娱乐无极限 “和 “社交能力 “在防范行为上的差异。

目的

徒步旅行是世界各地流行的旅游活动。尽管徒步旅行被认为是一种基于户外的软性探险活动, 没有什么风险和挑战, 但徒步旅行者也面临着危险的情况, 危险的行为可能导致死亡。本研究旨在了解徒步动机对徒步者防范行为的调节作用, 并为目的地管理组织提供启示。

研究结果

研究结果可以为有效的徒步旅行的标识工作提供参考, 帮助识别潜在的危险行为迹象。重要的是, 研究结果还强调了 “发挥极限 “和 “竞争 “的调节作用, 因为它们关系到风险认知和预防行为。

原创性

本研究的意义是针对目的地管理组织的, 即如何根据徒步者的动机来促进防范性的徒步行为。

Propósito

El senderismo es una actividad turística popular en todo el mundo. Aunque el senderismo se considera una actividad “poco exigente”, que implica poco riesgo y retos, los senderistas también se enfrentan a situaciones peligrosas donde las conductas de riesgo pueden conducir a accidentes fatales. Este estudio tiene como objetivo comprender los roles moderadores de las motivaciones del senderismo en el comportamiento precautorio de los senderistas y proporcionar implicaciones para las organizaciones de gestión de destinos.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Se realizó un experimento en línea 3x2 entre sujetos (N = 181) tratando la información in situ y la visibilidad de los peligros potenciales. Se aplicaron análisis de moderación (PROCESO SPSS) para derivar diferencias entre las motivaciones del senderismo “competitividad/exhibicionismo”, “jugar hasta el límite” y “sociabilidad” en el comportamiento precautorio.

Hallazgos

Los resultados reportan sobre la necesidad de realizar esfuerzos en la señalética de las rutas de senderismo que ayuden a identificar posibles indicaciones de comportamiento de riesgo. Es importante destacar que los hallazgos también subrayan el papel moderador de “jugar hasta el límite” y “competitividad”, ya que sugieren una relación entre la percepción de riesgo y el comportamiento precautorio.

Originalidad

Las implicaciones de este estudio se dirigen hacia las organizaciones de gestión de destinos sobre la manera de promover el comportamiento precautorio de senderismo basado en motivaciones de senderistas.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Cindy L Anderton and Elizabeth M King

This study aims to build on Gee’s (2003) earlier question exploring specifically the learning processes associated with broadening cultural empathy and exploring personal bias…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to build on Gee’s (2003) earlier question exploring specifically the learning processes associated with broadening cultural empathy and exploring personal bias through gameplay in the role-playing game, Oblivion.

Design/methodology/approach

Methodology for this case study (Stake, 1995) was informed by narrative (Reissman, 2001) methods that focused on collecting descriptions of the unique experiences of participants while being engaged in gameplay and their personal reflections synthesizing game-based engagement and course content. “Narrative research offers the possibility of exploring nuances and interrelationships among aspects of experience that the reader might better understand other related situations” (Josselson, p. 239). Our study focused on using narrative research methods to examine embodiment within the fictional world of the game as an experiential participatory-learning experience.

Findings

All participants indicated that the most salient learning experiences of the course was playing the game. The process participants underwent the experience of an event in the game and linked this gaming experience to their personal real-life reaction combined with emotions and thoughts. They then self-reflected on those reactions, which cumulatively contributed to self-reported increased self-awareness in the areas of personal bias, stereotypes, attitudes, values, beliefs and privilege. Three themes were identified from the data, namely, increase or variance in levels of self-awareness, navigating unfamiliar cultural systems and increased understanding and cognitive empathy for others. In addition, a fourth additional theme of embodiment and the value of embodiment were identified.

Research limitations/implications

Lacking in the findings were reports by participants regarding application of skills to different cultural populations. Future research will focus on how integration of application of skills can be facilitated using similar pedagogical practices. Because this study included a small number of participants who were counseling students in a master’s program, the applicability of the findings to other student populations is limited. Further research would need to determine whether or not the findings could be replicated with other types of students.

Practical implications

Embedding the intervention within the structure of a course appeared to provide a supportive and safe space for experiencing embodied selves, it also provided a mode for performing their future selves for and with colleagues experiencing similar situations. In this way, they were able to venture with and among their colleagues toward a fuller understanding of self, and particularly in conjunction to diverse populations. These features of the intervention appeared to work in concert together holistically affording a space where they could be vulnerable enough, open enough, to begin questioning their central thoughts and beliefs and increase their empathy for others who are different.

Social implications

Using the game of Oblivion allowed our students to have an embodied experience in a virtual space where they got to experience being in a completely different culture and experience culture shock. They had to make decisions that forced them to review their belief systems, go against their belief systems, or explore options that were against their belief systems in a safe way with no real-life repercussions. This embodied experience allowed our participants to engage in behaviors that none would dare to do in their real world and provided a comfort zone to explore taboo subjects.

Originality/value

Embedding the game within the curriculum encouraged participants to experience feelings of embodied empathy (Gee, 2010). Oblivion assisted in this process by providing participants the opportunity to gain entry into a unique designed world, a realistic but pseudo-cultural world replete with social and institutional structures both familiar and foreign to their real life. This appeared to provide a realistic manifestation of self, positioning participants toward experiencing embodied empathy for the designed scenarios in the game.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2021

Taylor M. Kessner, Priyanka Parekh, Earl Aguliera, Luis E. Pérez Cortés, Kelly M. Tran, Sinem Siyahhan and Elisabeth R. Gee

This paper aims to explore how making tabletop board games elicited adolescents’ design thinking during their participation in a summer game design camp at their local library.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how making tabletop board games elicited adolescents’ design thinking during their participation in a summer game design camp at their local library.

Design/methodology/approach

This study leverages qualitative approaches to coding transcripts of participants’ talk. This study uses the design thinking framework from the Hasso-Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford University as provisional codes to identify and make sense of participants’ verbalized design activity.

Findings

This study found that the making context of designing tabletop board games elicited a high frequency of design talk in participants, evidenced by both quantitative and qualitative reports of the data. Additionally, participants in large measure obviated constraints on their design activity imposed by linear conceptions of the design thinking model this study introduces, instead of moving fluidly across design modes. Finally, participants’ prior experiences in both life and in regard to games significantly influenced their design study.

Originality/value

This study highlights the unique affordances of making-centric approaches to designing tabletop games in particular, such as participants’ quick and sustained engagement in the study of design. This study also highlights the need for conceptions of design thinking specific to designing games.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 122 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Vittorio Marone, Cary Staples and Katherine H. Greenberg

In this paper, the authors present the insights and takeaways related to their experience with the design and development of ProblemUp!, a card game focused on helping higher…

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Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors present the insights and takeaways related to their experience with the design and development of ProblemUp!, a card game focused on helping higher education students develop personal strategies to overcome challenges in college and in life.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study with analysis of and reflections on the design and development of an educational card game.

Findings

The design and development of ProblemUp! has engendered a number of insights to analyze, design and implement games that can help students become successful learners in school and life, beyond subject matter. The authors realized that it is worthwhile to offer different opportunities for players to engage with the game (e.g. alternative sets of rules, face-to-face and online versions), while at the same time keeping the game affordable, accessible and fun to play. Ultimately, ProblemUp! reflects a social and playful approach to learning that can help students become strategic learners and creative problem solvers in a complex and ever-changing world.

Research/limitations/implications

The potential contribution of ProblemUp! to students’ academic success in higher education is significant. Often students’ reluctance to face challenges is perceived as a lack of ability when it is actually a lack of knowledge and skills in metacognition and decision-making. If students have a sense of their own competence and control over challenges in academic learning, then they will be motivated to persevere with academic study. ProblemUp! offers the opportunity for students to develop knowledge and skills that are often hidden from them, their teachers and tutors.

Practical implications

In higher education, ProblemUp! has the potential for use in a variety of ways. It can be presented in post-secondary settings as a resource for students, with or without facilitation of tutors and others working to improve student retention. It can also be introduced within courses by a facilitator who can help students understand how the strategies they create can be adapted to overcome challenges within a course or, in general, for succeeding in college. Opportunities can also be created so that students can join an online game as the need arises, with or without support.

Social implications

By speaking the “language of metacognition” embedded in the Cognitive Enrichment Advantage (CEA) approach (e.g. making comparisons, getting the main idea, connecting events, etc.), students can develop a “problem-solving grammar” which can be applied in a variety of situations to articulate the discourse on problems and the strategies to overcome them.

Originality/Value

The paper presents a novel approach to metacognitive learning, strategic thinking and problem-solving by leveraging bizarre problems in a social-constructive environment. It also includes practical and usable insights for educators, teachers and game designers.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 April 2020

Lucinda Brabbins, Nima Moghaddam and David Dawson

Background: Quality of life is a core concern for cancer patients, which can be negatively affected by illness-related death anxiety; yet understanding of how to appropriately…

Abstract

Background: Quality of life is a core concern for cancer patients, which can be negatively affected by illness-related death anxiety; yet understanding of how to appropriately target psycho-oncological interventions remains lacking. We aimed to explore experiential acceptance in cancer patients, and whether acceptance – as an alternative to avoidant coping – was related to and predictive of better quality of life and death anxiety outcomes.

Methods: We used a longitudinal, quantitative design with a follow-up after three months. Seventy-two participants completed a questionnaire-battery measuring illness appraisals, acceptance and non-acceptance coping-styles, quality of life, and death anxiety; 31 participants repeated the battery after three months.

Results: Acceptance was an independent explanatory and predictive variable for quality of life and death anxiety, in the direction of psychological health. Acceptance had greater explanatory power for outcomes than either cancer appraisals or avoidant response styles. Avoidant response styles were associated with greater death anxiety and poorer quality of life.

Conclusions: The findings support the role of an accepting response-style in favourable psychological outcomes, identifying a possible target for future psychological intervention. Response styles that might be encouraged in other therapies, such as active coping, planning, and positive reframing, were not associated with beneficial outcomes.

Details

Emerald Open Research, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-3952

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2023

Marion Garaus, Christian Weismayer and Elisabeth Steiner

This study investigates the impact of sensory food descriptors on restaurant menus on the intention to visit a restaurant and to spread positive word-of-mouth.

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the impact of sensory food descriptors on restaurant menus on the intention to visit a restaurant and to spread positive word-of-mouth.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the signalling theory and the assimilation-contrast theory, two online experiments and one field experiment test the assumption that food descriptors prompt food-quality inferences before and after consumption, and that in both stages, food-quality inferences prompt favourable behavioural intentions.

Findings

Sensory food descriptors impact positively on behavioural intentions through quality inferences, although not all aspects of food quality mediate this effect.

Research limitations/implications

Not all four factors (deliciousness, visual attractiveness, variety and nutritiousness) prompt behavioural intentions to the same extent. While the signalling theory explains the positive impact of food-quality inferences on behavioural intentions before consumption, the assimilation-contrast theory explains the positive effect food-quality inferences have on the intention to revisit and word of mouth after consumption.

Practical implications

Managers should use either oral somatosensory descriptors alone, or in combination with flavour descriptors to prompt quality inferences and behavioural intentions.

Originality/value

The findings challenge the prevailing assumption that food descriptors addressing multiple senses have a superior effect on food-quality inferences compared to food descriptors stimulating only one sense. Instead, food descriptors referring to the texture, viscosity or mouthfeel of a dish, (i.e. oral somatosensory descriptors), impact on food-quality inferences, while adding flavour attributes did not have favourable effects.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 125 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Mark Halley

Purpose: In this chapter, I explore how American Sign Language/English interpreters came to enact an ally role with members of the American deaf community during the 1988 Deaf…

Abstract

Purpose: In this chapter, I explore how American Sign Language/English interpreters came to enact an ally role with members of the American deaf community during the 1988 Deaf President Now (DPN) protest. The DPN protest, led by students at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC, was a historic moment in the deaf community's struggle for civil rights (Christiansen & Barnartt, 1995). During the events that unfolded over the week-long rebellion, students engaged in a variety of claims-making activities (Lindekilde, 2013), such as participating in media interviews and organizing rallies. To share their message with the world, the deaf protesters developed alliances with American Sign Language/English interpreters, who mediated a wide variety of protest-related activities.

Method: The data I analyze in this chapter come from (1) archival review and (2) semistructured interviews I conducted with DPN stakeholders, including interpreters and protesters.

Findings: Through these data, I explore how the protesters and interpreters came to develop shared understandings and expectations of allyship, including the roles that interpreters enacted in the protest.

Implication/Value: I frame this discussion within the context of a variety of metaphors that have been used to describe the role of signed language interpreters (Roy, 1993, 2002) and the concept of role-space (Llewellyn-Jones & Lee, 2014) to demonstrate the process of interpreters becoming allies in contentious political settings.

Details

Disability Alliances and Allies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-322-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

J. Kiarash Sadeghi, Elisabeth Struckell, Divesh Ojha and David Nowicki

Service organization supply chains provide a context that amplifies the complexity of interorganizational interdependencies and the need to build unique capabilities and…

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Abstract

Purpose

Service organization supply chains provide a context that amplifies the complexity of interorganizational interdependencies and the need to build unique capabilities and innovative solutions, especially when confronted with man-made or natural disasters. Using the lens of complex adaptive systems (CAS), this study aims to investigate the role of absorptive capacity (AC), change management capability and information quality in improving a firm’s ability to cope with disasters – disaster immunity (DI). The study uniquely parses absorptive capacity into a three-variable, second-order construct (absorptive human resource management, absorptive complementary knowledge and absorptive infrastructure).

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected from 264 US service firms in a supply chain context, this paper evaluates the research model using the structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

The second-order, three-dimensional framework for AC has far superior psychometric properties as compared to the previous unidimensional conceptualizations. Results show that AC influences a firm’s DI through change management capability and information quality – two DI enhancing resources.

Originality/value

The paper builds on previous conceptual discussions of absorptive capacity as a multidimensional construct by operationalizing AC as a latent variable with three dimensions (above). Moreover, this paper shows that AC, change management capability, information quality and DI are interrelated parts of a CAS.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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