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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Elisabeth Lowenstein and Darolyn “Lyn” Jones

In this study, two mother-scholars describe their lived experiences working in higher education in the USA while parenting children with disabilities. They situate their…

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, two mother-scholars describe their lived experiences working in higher education in the USA while parenting children with disabilities. They situate their narratives within the context of institutionalized motherhood, courtesy stigma and the career plateau experienced by many working mothers of children with disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Within this collaborative autoethnography, the authors employ autoethnographic narrative and poetic inquiry.

Findings

The authors reveal unique work-life tensions that they have experienced as mothers, teachers and scholars, reflecting on the experiences that led them to become advocates for people and families with disabilities.

Practical implications

The authors aim to reduce stigma and to disrupt the career plateau by offering suggestions to help coworkers and supervisors be more supportive of working parents of children with disabilities.

Originality/value

The authors enumerate the advantages of collaborative autoethnography in uncovering how stigma against mothers of children with disabilities is manifested within an academic community.

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Gloria Macassa, Eija Viitasara, Örjan Sundin, Henrique Barros, Francisco Torres Gonzales, Elisabeth Ioannidi‐Kapolou, Melchiorre Maria Gabriella, Jutta Lindert, Mindaugas Stankunas and Joaquim J.F. Soares

Elder abuse is an issue of great concern world‐wide, not least in Europe. Older people are increasingly vulnerable to physical, psychological, financial maltreatment and…

Abstract

Purpose

Elder abuse is an issue of great concern world‐wide, not least in Europe. Older people are increasingly vulnerable to physical, psychological, financial maltreatment and sexual coercion. However, due to complexities of measurement, psychological abuse may be underestimated. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence of psychological abuse toward older persons within a 12 month period.

Design/methodology/approach

The study design was cross‐sectional and data were collected during January‐July 2009 in the survey “Elder abuse: a multinational prevalence survey, ABUEL”. The participants were 4,467 randomly selected persons aged 60‐84 years (2,559 women, 57.3 per cent) from seven EU countries (Germany, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Portugal, Spain, Sweden). The sample size was adapted to each city according to their population of women and men aged 60‐84 years (albeit representative and proportional to sex‐age). The participants answered a structured questionnaire either through a face‐to‐face interview or a mix of interview/self‐response. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and regression methods.

Findings

The prevalence of overall psychological abuse was 29.7 per cent in Sweden, followed by 27.1 per cent in Germany; 24.6 per cent in Lithuania and 21.9 per cent in Portugal. The lowest prevalence was reported in Greece, Spain and Italy with 13.2 per cent, 11.5 per cent and 10.4 per cent, respectively. Similar tendencies were observed concerning minor/severe abuse. The Northern countries (Germany, Lithuania, Sweden) compared to Southern countries (Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain) reported a higher mean prevalence (across countries) of minor/severe abuse (26.3 per cent/11.5 per cent and 12.9 per cent/5.9 per cent, respectively). Most perpetrators (71.2 per cent) were spouses/partners and other relatives (e.g. children). The regression analysis indicated that being from Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain was associated with less risk of psychological abuse. Low social support, living in rented housing, alcohol use, frequent health care use, and high scores in anxiety and somatic complaints were associated with increased risk of psychological abuse.

Social implications

Psychological abuse was more prevalent in Northern than Southern countries and factors such as low social support and high anxiety levels played an important role. Further studies are warranted to investigate the prevalence of psychological abuse and risk factors among older persons in other EU countries. Particular attention should be paid to severe abuse. Such research may help policy makers and health planers/providers in tailoring interventions to tackle the ever growing problem of elder abuse.

Originality/value

The paper reports data from the ABUEL Survey, which collected population based data on elderly abuse.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Sarah Hean, Elisabeth Willumsen and Atle Ødegård

Effective collaboration between mental health services (MHS) and criminal justice services (CJS) impacts on mental illness and reduces reoffending rates. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Effective collaboration between mental health services (MHS) and criminal justice services (CJS) impacts on mental illness and reduces reoffending rates. This paper proposes the change laboratory model (CLM) of workplace transformation as a potential tool to support interagency collaborative practice that has potential to complement current integration tools used in this context. The purpose of this paper is to focus specifically on the theoretical dimension of the model: the cultural historical activity systems theory (CHAT) as a theoretical perspective that offers a framework with which interactions between the MHS and CJS can be better understood.

Design/methodology/approach

The structure and rationale behind future piloting of the change laboratory in this context is made. Then CHAT theory is briefly introduced and then its utility illustrated in the presentation of the findings of a qualitative study of leaders from MHS and CJS that explored their perspectives of the characteristics of collaborative working between MHS and prison/probation services in a Norwegian context and using CHAT as an analytical framework.

Findings

Leaders suggested that interactions between the two services, within the Norwegian system at least, are most salient when professionals engage in the reintegration and rehabilitation of the offender. Achieving effective communication within the boundary space between the two systems is a focus for professionals engaging in interagency working and this is mediated by a range of integration tools such as coordination plans and interagency meetings. Formalised interagency agreements and informal, unspoken norms of interaction governed this activity. Key challenges limiting the collaboration between the two systems included resource limitations, logistical issues and differences in professional judgments on referral and confidentiality.

Originality/value

Current tools with which MHS/CJS interactions are understood and managed, fail to make explicit the dimensions and nature of these complex interactions. The CLM, and CHAT as its theoretical underpinning, has been highly successful internationally and in other clinical contexts, as a means of exploring and developing interagency working. It is a new idea in prison development, none as yet being applied to the challenges facing the MHS and CJS. This paper addresses this by illustrating the use of CHAT as an analytical framework with which to articulate MHS/CJS collaborations and the potential of the CLM more widely to address current challenges in a context specific, bottom-up and fluid approach to interagency working in this environment.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Joaquim Jorge Fernandes Soares, Eija Viitasara, Gloria Macassa, Maria Gabriella Melchiorre, Mindaugas Stankunas, Jutta Lindert, Henrique Barros, Elisabeth Ioannidi-Kapolou and Francisco Torres-González

The purpose of this paper is to examine differences in the experience of somatic symptoms by domain (exhaustion, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, heart distress) between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine differences in the experience of somatic symptoms by domain (exhaustion, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, heart distress) between psychologically abused and non-abused older persons, and to scrutinize associations between abuse and somatic symptoms while considering other factors (e.g. social support).

Design/methodology/approach

The design was cross-sectional. The participants were 4,467 women/men aged 60-84 years living in seven European cities. The data were analysed using bivariate/multivariate methods.

Findings

Psychologically abused participants scored higher on all somatic symptom domains than non-abused, and thus were more affected by the symptoms. The regressions confirmed a positive association between psychological abuse and most somatic symptom domains, but other factors (e.g. depression, anxiety) were more salient. Demographics/socio-economics were positively (e.g. marriage/cohabitation) or negatively (e.g. education) associated with somatic symptoms depending on the domain. Social support and family structure “protected” the experience of somatic symptoms.

Research limitations/implications

The research focused on psychological abuse. It did not incorporate other abuse types calling for further research on the effects of other abuse types on somatic symptoms. Nevertheless, the findings indicate that psychological abuse is linked to somatic symptoms, but the role of other factors (e.g. depression, anxiety, social support) is also important.

Practical implications

Improvements in the older person's situation regarding somatic symptoms need to consider psychological abuse, co-morbidities, social support and living conditions.

Originality/value

The paper reports data from the ABUEL Survey, which collected population-based data on elder abuse.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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