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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Elena Revilla and Maria Jesus Saenz

The purpose of this paper is to develop a taxonomy of how companies implement Supply Chain Risk Management (SCRM) in terms of two fundamental approaches: the first…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a taxonomy of how companies implement Supply Chain Risk Management (SCRM) in terms of two fundamental approaches: the first emerging from internal actions and operations within companies, and the other involving inter-organizational actions undertaken with external supply chain partners. This taxonomy aims to predict firms’ performance with regard to the frequency of supply chain disruption.

Design/methodology/approach

A cluster analysis of survey data from 908 firms representing 69 countries together with an analysis of variance.

Findings

The authors’ analysis demonstrates a clear structure of four different patterns of how companies manage supply chain risks: passive, internal, collaborative, and integral. The authors found that firms pursuing an inter-organizational orientation (collaborative and integral) face the lowest levels of supply chain disruption. On the contrary, strategies which simply concentrate on having greater control of internal operations are not vigorous enough to stop the cascade effect of a disruption at the supply chain level. Furthermore, the excellent performance of integral SCRM strategies also suggests that collaboration between buyers and suppliers ensures the efficacy of internal business continuity plans and security procedures.

Practical implications

Managers should play an active role in making sure that supply chain management and risk management disciplines evolve together. Obviously, when an exogenous event results in a supply chain disruption, a firm will try to put its operations under control through internal capabilities. But SCRM strategies designed proactively in advance with relevant partners are even more beneficial.

Originality/value

First, previous studies have limited the analysis of SCRM mainly to its reactive internal initiatives within a firm. This paper takes the SCRM literature beyond the internal focus by considering both internal and inter-organizational efforts and, more importantly, developing a single configurational model to analyze modes of interaction. Second, there is little empirical evidence showing the current situation of SCRM. Research in SCRM has been more qualitative than empirical, especially in global coverage. The research tackles this gap and, based on a broader scope of the samples the empirical findings show a higher level of generalizability.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2018

Veronica H. Villena, Guanyi Lu, Luis R. Gomez-Mejia and Elena Revilla

Supply chain managers (SC managers) may make less than optimal decisions for the firm when facing compensation and employment risks. The purpose of this paper is to study…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain managers (SC managers) may make less than optimal decisions for the firm when facing compensation and employment risks. The purpose of this paper is to study two relevant factors (target setting and strategic importance of the supply chain function) that may drive SC managers to perceive more or less risk to their welfare.

Design/methodology/approach

The study combines survey data from 133 firms with secondary data in order to reduce source bias and enhance the validity of results. The authors also conducted interviews with supply chain and human resources managers.

Findings

The results show that top managers can alter SC managers’ perceived risks. Ambitious targets drive compensation risk but not employment risk. The supply chain function’s strategic importance, on the other hand, decreases employment risk but increases compensation risk.

Research limitations/implications

The authors emphasize two ways that the top management team (TMT) influences SC managers’ perceived personal welfare but acknowledge that there may be others factors. Due to the topic sensitivity, the authors could not collect data on all variables (e.g. individual characteristics) that may affect risk perception. The findings are based on Spanish firms and may not be generalized to other contexts.

Practical implications

This research proposes three suggestions. First, compensation and employment risks should be considered separately when designing compensation and evaluation systems. Second, appropriate performance targets may put compensation risk in a reasonable range that is neither too high to prevent risky-yet-beneficial decisions nor too low to allow nonfeasance. Third, escalating the supply chain’s strategic importance effectively offsets employment risk.

Originality/value

Scholars have repeatedly shown the negative outcomes of SC managers’ perceived compensation and employment risks. Yet, little attention has been given to their antecedents. The study explores two relevant antecedents and provides integrative empirical evidence regarding actions top leaders can take to manage SC managers’ perceived risk and subsequently enhance firm performance.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Isabel M. Prieto and Elena Revilla

This paper analyzes how organizations may use different knowledge management styles according to higher or lower emphasis on (1) techno‐structural initiatives for…

Abstract

This paper analyzes how organizations may use different knowledge management styles according to higher or lower emphasis on (1) techno‐structural initiatives for information processing, and (2) behavioral solutions for knowledge sharing by organizational members. As a consequence, the effects of these styles on learning capacity are also different. The empirical analysis of the present study found that knowledge management practices can be categorized into four styles: (1) passive, (2) behavioral, (3) techno‐structural, and (4) active. The active style, which implies superior management of both techno‐structural and behavioral tools of knowledge management has been the most effective in the development of learning capacity. In contrast, the passive style, which implies weak management of both kinds of knowledge management initiatives, results in lower learning capacity. Hence, this work focuses on suggesting and empirically testing a characteristic framework for how a set of knowledge management initiatives interact and influence learning capacity in organizations.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Elena Revilla and Desirée Knoppen

There are two major objectives in the research. First, the authors investigate the impact of knowledge integration in terms of joint decision-making and joint…

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4192

Abstract

Purpose

There are two major objectives in the research. First, the authors investigate the impact of knowledge integration in terms of joint decision-making and joint sense-making, on relational performance, including operational efficiency and innovation. Second, the authors examine the key antecedents that might facilitate knowledge integration: strategic supply management and trust. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper expands and tests theory drawing upon survey data from 133 buyer-supplier relationships (BSRs). The authors employed a two-step process of analysis to evaluate first the measurement model and then the structural model. The measurement model test built upon confirmatory factor analysis, while the structural model quality test built upon path analysis.

Findings

The results suggest that both integrative mechanisms, joint decision making and joint sense making, affect performance although in different ways. This study also finds that while trust has multiple significant influences and consequently must be viewed as an organizing principle, strategic supply management is required to jointly understand the dynamic and complex context but not to jointly make ongoing decisions.

Research limitations/implications

Three limitations: first, this study was cross-sectional rather than longitudinal. Second, in line with accepted practice, the authors surveyed only one side of the relationship. The suppliers’ viewpoint is thus not fully taken into account. Third, another potential limitation of the study is that the sample stems from just one country and its size does not distinguish subgroups in the analysis of the path model.

Practical implications

Managers should be advised that: first, a trusting partnership built on knowledge integration is a hard order, especially with a new, unknown supplier in a low-cost country, where intellectual property protection is less obvious; second, strategic supply management may not improve cost or operational performance, but in its absence, it is unlikely that a supplier has insight into the exact needs of its buyer and thus, may not add considerable value to their customers; third, building a dynamic knowledge integration capability (valuable, rare, and difficult to imitate) takes time, as does creating reliable learning mechanisms. Joint teams, visit partners’ workplace, early involve suppliers in developing new products or selection of supplier with high-learning capabilities may help to create a knowledge integration capability.

Social implications

The authors suggest that companies should move from an arm-length relationship and turn their supplier relationships into a tool for innovating faster while cutting cost. In order to do this, joint sense-making and joint decision should be seen as institutionalized inter-firm routines rather than ad hoc activities. Thus, the authors recommend managers to proactively build certain knowledge-based capabilities that hinges heavily upon a strategic stance toward supply management and trustful relationships with selected suppliers.

Originality/value

The major intent of this research is to expand understanding of knowledge integration by building a more testable, complex model around its creation. While previous research relied on a configuration approach to explore the relationship between knowledge integration and performance, the authors evaluate causal relationships at the level of the formative dimensions rather than higher order knowledge integration, as this has proven to be a superior analytical method. Second, although supply chain scholars have expressed great interest in trust, an in-depth examination of prior studies in knowledge integration indicate that trust has been analyzed alone. In contrast, the study empirically examines the simultaneous effect of trust and strategic supply management in BSRs.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Elena Revilla, Beatriz Rodríguez‐Prado and Isabel Prieto

The purpose of this paper is to focus on one of the most recognized knowledge management enablers, information technology (IT), and explores how IT influences on knowledge…

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1700

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on one of the most recognized knowledge management enablers, information technology (IT), and explores how IT influences on knowledge base capabilities in product development – specifically knowledge exploitation and exploration.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses are empirically tested through the analysis of 80 product developments, and valid and reliable measures for each variable are developed. The research methodology uses a two‐step approach.

Findings

The study shows that product development processes can be categorized within three IT configurations: balanced IT configuration, convergent‐based IT configuration and divergent‐based IT configuration. These results show that differences in IT configurations in product development may lead to differences in terms of knowledge exploitation and show the advantages of the balanced IT configuration that combines both dimensions of IT.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is not large and the scope of this study is limited to firms located in the Madrid area, Spain. The measurement effort represents an advance for research but, nonetheless, they measure facts that are neither fully nor easily measurable. All data were collected from the same respondent, using the same perceptual measurement technique.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that product development managers would be advised to consider knowledge based goals when selecting their IT tools. It also highlights that product development efforts should not involve an excluding trade‐off between the convergent and the divergent dimensions of IT (whereby one is at the expense of the other), but a balance of both dimensions.

Originality/value

The paper differs from previous research in a number of important ways. First, it focuses on benefits to product development. Second, it measures the impact of IT on knowledge base capabilities. Third, it focuses on the configuration of IT and an evaluation of how different configurations impact on different types of knowledge based capabilities.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Isabel Ma Prieto and Elena Revilla

There has been little research that includes reliable deductions about the positive influence of learning capability on business performance. For this reason, the main…

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5123

Abstract

Purpose

There has been little research that includes reliable deductions about the positive influence of learning capability on business performance. For this reason, the main objective of the present study is to empirically explore the link between learning capability in organizations and business performance evaluated in both financial and non‐financial terms.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from 111 Spanish companies, research was conducted through a structural equation modelling. In doing so, a measurement model was conducted for the main constructs – learning capability, financial performance and non‐financial performance‐ and examine the paths between them.

Findings

The analysis shows the positive link existing between: learning capability and non‐financial performance; and non‐financial performance and financial performance.

Originality/value

This is a detailed empirical examination of learning capability as a source of performance in organizations. It should be of value to all those who think about the role of learning processes and knowledge in organizations, and who care about their effects on competitiveness.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Isabel M. Prieto, Elena Revilla and Beatriz Rodríguez‐Prado

The purpose of this paper is to obtain from paradox a novel lens to elucidate the connections between knowledge management (KM) and product development as a knowledge

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2482

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to obtain from paradox a novel lens to elucidate the connections between knowledge management (KM) and product development as a knowledge intensive process. By focusing on the “social side” of KM, it is proposed that different KM orientations can emerge as a result of higher or lower emphasis on both cultural and structural enablers. These KM orientations generate specific potential to manage the tension and paradox of managing both knowledge exploration and knowledge exploitation knowledge during product development.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical evidence is provided by performing survey research with data collected from 80 product development projects developed in Spain.

Findings

Results show that product development efforts can show three different KM orientations that significantly differ in their results in terms of knowledge exploration and, specially, knowledge exploitation. Moreover, product development requires a symbiosis between both cultural and structural enablers to best manage the paradox of exploration and exploitation.

Originality/value

The measurement items used can realistically be thought of as only proxies for an underlying and latent phenomenon that is neither fully nor easily measurable. Together with it, replies from multiple respondents would have ruled out potential drawbacks.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Ely Laureano Paiva, Elena Revilla Gutierrez and Aleda V. Roth

This paper aims to analyze manufacturing strategy process (MSP) from a knowledge‐based view (KBV) of the firm. MSP considers the ways that manufacturing organizes its

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1684

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze manufacturing strategy process (MSP) from a knowledge‐based view (KBV) of the firm. MSP considers the ways that manufacturing organizes its resources in order to create/strengthen manufacturing‐related capabilities. In this context, managers often are under pressure to find quick answers in highly complex environments. By viewing MSP as a knowledge creation process, managers may choose a company's objectives based upon previous experiences and knowledge. MSP addresses the level of planning and decision making related to building competitive operations capabilities over the long term.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research was used to make cross‐country comparison. The constructs were empirically confirmed in both country samples, attesting to measurement invariance. The proposed model was tested in both samples and analyzed the differences between them.

Findings

The results suggest that knowledge is a key resource in MSP in both samples. Resource‐based orientation presents higher levels of influence over MSP in Brazil. In the Spanish sample the influence of external knowledge in MSP and market performance is more relevant.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this study is that the Brazilian sample is located in a specific region and therefore some regional characteristics may be present. Another limitation was the use of a questionnaire in two different countries that was originally developed in a non‐native language.

Practical implications

As a practical implication, manufacturing should seek to integrate the strategic process in order to be more responsive in dynamic environments.

Originality/value

The paper uses a cross‐country sample for scale validation, which is rare in management research. Manufacturing strategy process was analyzed from a knowledge‐based view, bringing new possibilities for academic studies. For managers, the paper highlights the importance of manufacturing developing a proactive role through knowledge integration in cross‐functional activities during the strategic process.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Elena Revilla and Desirée Knoppen

At the heart of realizing superior product development there seems to be the development of organizational mechanisms that fuel team vision. In light of this, the purpose…

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1091

Abstract

Purpose

At the heart of realizing superior product development there seems to be the development of organizational mechanisms that fuel team vision. In light of this, the purpose of this paper is to build and empirically test a conceptual model (input‐process‐output) of team vision at the product development level to establish the relationship between the contextual antecedents such as trust and learning culture (inputs), team vision (process) and product development performance in terms of process outcomes (i.e. team effectiveness) and product outcomes (i.e. value to customer).

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence is drawn from a sample of 80 Spanish product developments. Data are analyzed through confirmatory factor analysis and path analysis based on composite scores, supported by Lisrel.

Findings

Results show that team vision in combination with an organizational context, built upon a learning culture and trust, has a positive impact on product development performance. This influence is higher in terms of process outcomes than in terms of product outcomes. Also, the impact of learning culture on team vision and performance is higher than the impact of trust.

Research limitations/implications

The findings open up new research questions about the role of team vision within product development. Research studies taking into account the development of an organizational context that promotes trust‐based relationships and a learning culture would be helpful in order to draw further conclusions.

Practical implications

The paper provides managers with convincing evidence of the need to foster team vision in product development.

Originality/value

The paper reduces the relative lack of empirical work within existing models about team vision and extends the existing research on team vision to the product development level.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

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1212

Abstract

Details

Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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