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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

A.M. Fairchild, P.M.A. Ribbers and A.O. Nooteboom

Although many electronic markets have opened up, adoption of electronic marketplaces worldwide has been lower than expected. It is still unclear what the exact effects of…

2927

Abstract

Although many electronic markets have opened up, adoption of electronic marketplaces worldwide has been lower than expected. It is still unclear what the exact effects of electronic markets are, how they emerge, and what markets will eventually turn out to be the most successful in the industry. Several consultancy firms, e.g. Forrester, Merrill Lynch, and Morgan Stanley, have made statements on success factors of electronic markets, such as acquiring domain expertise, and a critical mass of users. However, none of those has been empirically studied. Because of the high failure rate of electronic markets, this research tries to identify specific factors that might be crucial for electronic market success. Through a literature review of previous research, an exploratory research model is developed to specify the success factors. Case study examples are used to assess the validity of the research model and illustrate the economic effects that could be experienced by both the electronic market itself, and by buyers and sellers, focusing on the conditions under which electronic markets are likely to fail or are likely to be a success.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Troy J. Strader and Michael J. Shaw

In this paper we address research issues related to the economics of electronic, Internet‐based markets. First, what are the consumer cost‐based differences for…

2512

Abstract

In this paper we address research issues related to the economics of electronic, Internet‐based markets. First, what are the consumer cost‐based differences for traditional and electronic markets? Second, what revenue implications does increased electronic market utilization have for sellers and transaction intermediaries? Based on an empirical, survey‐based study of an electronic market in the sports trading card industry we find that prices, search costs, and sales taxes are lower in the electronic markets, while risk costs, distribution costs, and market costs are lower in traditional markets. We discuss the implications this has for seller, intermediary and government revenue sources.

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Internet Research, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

65225

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

M.K. Lai, P.K. Humphreys and D. Sculli

Examines the application of electronic commerce (EC) in a cross‐cultural context. The problems likely to be encountered by a Chinese organization are analysed and…

1390

Abstract

Examines the application of electronic commerce (EC) in a cross‐cultural context. The problems likely to be encountered by a Chinese organization are analysed and interpreted in terms of conflicting cultural values. The costs associated with EC are also analyzed and two new costs, technology and competition, are introduced. The costs are classified according to the traditional market and the EC market and also by the coordination mechanism. While Chinese firms are showing considerable enthusiasm for EC, it is felt that they may not yet be ready to undertake the major organizational developments and re‐engineering efforts required to successfully implement EC. EC will also present Chinese managers with faceless transactions which may conflict with current cultural values.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 101 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Colm Fearon, Joan Ballantine and George Philip

This paper aims to examine the relationship between cooperation and inter‐organisational coordination in the supply chain. There is much literature debate over the nature…

1504

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between cooperation and inter‐organisational coordination in the supply chain. There is much literature debate over the nature of electronic trading enabled cooperation and coordination in the supply chain. The paper examines the major concepts associated with inter‐organisational cooperation in social network literature such as collaboration and partnership and how this is affected by changing forms of coordination (market and hierarchy) governance.

Design/methodology/approach

Seminal literatures about how electronic market and hierarchy coordination mechanisms have changed over time are examined. While some evidence from interviewing companies is used in conjunction with literature to inform discuss the workings of a matrix framework, the discussion remains essentially conceptual.

Findings

A conceptual cooperation and coordination matrix outlines four quadrant forms of cooperation relative to evolving electronic markets and hierarchy coordination contexts, namely; “collaboration”, “partnership”, “dominance” and “autonomous”. The matrix depicts and describes subtle differences in these forms of cooperation. Collaboration involves a low degree of vertical integration and a high number of trading partners transacting on short‐term contracts. Partnering involves a higher degree of inter‐firm linkage with fewer stable partners on a medium to long‐term basis. Dominance is characterised as a traditional form of hierarchical inter‐firm linkage with a high degree of vertical integration. The autonomous organisation specialises in the production and delivery of major super brands which in the case of information based products can be sold directly to the customer.

Originality/value

The contribution is a discussion analysis and new matrix framework depicting forms of cooperation relative to market and hierarchy coordination contexts in the supply chain. This is useful for understanding theoretical interplay between different forms of inter‐firm cooperation and complex supply chain inter‐dependencies that utilise information technology.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Daniel Berhin, Frédéric Godart, Maya Jollès and Paul Nihoul

This paper aims to question the disappearance of sector‐specific regulation in European electronic communications markets.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to question the disappearance of sector‐specific regulation in European electronic communications markets.

Design/methodology/approach

To show that sector‐specific regulation will remain, five arguments are developed based on different disciplines: law, economics, political science and sociology.

Findings

It is found that sector‐specific regulation has already been in place for 15 years and there is no concrete indication that it will end soon. Competition law has intrinsic limitations, which, arguably, do not make it possible for authorities to resort only to that body of the law to ensure a smooth functioning of the electronic communications markets. The balance of power in the EU leads to sector‐specific regulation being maintained in the years ahead as the ideal way for European institutions to intervene in electronic communications markets. The electronic communications market requires regulation going beyond competition law in order to ensure the realization of non‐economic purposes. The implementation of sector‐specific regulation might contribute to concentrating the electronic communications markets.

Practical implications

Contrary to the claims of the European institutions that sector‐specific regulation in the electronic communication markets will lose its relevance, this paper argues that it is likely to remain for the foreseeable future.

Originality/value

The paper shows that deregulating a sector is not an easy task and that ex ante regulation is a key legal instrument for the proper functioning of a market.

Details

info, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Niklas Aldin, Per‐Olof Brehmer and Anders Johansson

Electronic commerce enables business development for marketing channel intermediaries and strengthens their existing operations and strategic management. This research…

8369

Abstract

Electronic commerce enables business development for marketing channel intermediaries and strengthens their existing operations and strategic management. This research shows that electronic commerce provides stepwise business development refinement and repositioning in the form of process change and increased customer service. Based on marketing and logistics literature, a business development model with three developmental phases is proposed in this paper. The findings are based on the electronic commerce development of three intermediaries providing industrial products and services in the northern European market. Refinement is achieved through a focus on activities for internal efficiency, and through changing processes for increased integration, shorter time and lower costs. Repositioning involves extended focus on service improvements, image and customer tailored services. It is found that electronic commerce has not radically reshaped and developed the role of marketing channel intermediaries. Instead, it has strengthened existing business. Future electronic commerce efforts need to be viewed in a business wide development context, including structural change and reaching new segments or markets, to utilise fully the development potential of electronic commerce.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Khanh V. La and Jay Kandampully

The rapid development of electronic commerce (e‐commerce) has seen emerging electronic service retailers attracting the interest of, and gaining the patronage of, both…

4381

Abstract

The rapid development of electronic commerce (e‐commerce) has seen emerging electronic service retailers attracting the interest of, and gaining the patronage of, both service providers and customers. However, there is consensus that the e‐commerce industry in general has not been able to cope with all the challenges of, and to realise the true potential of, the technology‐based marketplace. Through an extensive literature review and the use of industry examples, this article brings together existing theories and new realities in the emerging electronic market. Argues that, although the Internet marketplace possesses unique characteristics, which Web‐based businesses must be able to manage, there are certain traditional values that remain central to business success in all markets. Offers a detailed analysis of the various factors that influence the market success of an electronic service retailer and provides specific managerial implications for practitioners.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Stephen E. Arnold

Marketing information’ is one of the litanies of electronic publishing in the 1990s. But who really knows how to market electronic information?

Abstract

Marketing information’ is one of the litanies of electronic publishing in the 1990s. But who really knows how to market electronic information?

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Simon Forge

Are we now entering the era of a new type of economy, with new rules? What we perceive is more than just an addition to today’s economics. By removing the effects of…

Abstract

Are we now entering the era of a new type of economy, with new rules? What we perceive is more than just an addition to today’s economics. By removing the effects of distance, and giving more equal access across nations and classes, networks will effectively reengineer our basic economic equations. Electronic networks can provide access to skills, work and commerce at much lower cost, via electronic markets in jobs, products, services and education. At the same time, they introduce new economic behaviour, as a large enough quantitative change becomes a qualitative change. Electronics and optics enable the networking of human capital, expanding its application and accelerating its enrichment via education. So knowledge‐based operations may slowly replace traditional capital‐based assets. Consequently, the conventional process for the creation of wealth with its prerequisites for capital investment is revised:economic value in traditional fixed assets is replaced by “electronic assets”. At the same time, the network effect pushes the market mechanism to its limits, through a step‐change in breadth of access, reduced costs of entry and pace of trading. National differences and national markets, all the trappings and devices of commercial locality, are challenged. In this first of two articles, the initial conditions and the evidence for change are examined and the emergence of a new form of economy, or “tele‐economy”, is reviewed. Following from this, a view of the form of capitalism driving the economic environment – “electronic capitalism” – is put forward. The second article, to be published in a forthcoming issue of foresight, examines the consequences and conclusions on assets, wealth accumulation, national players and the benefits and dangers of a tele‐economy.

Details

Foresight, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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