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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Eleanor R.E. O’Higgins

Much of the debate on the alleged evils and merits of globalization has been based on after‐the‐fact argument. Depending on the protagonist’s viewpoint, the delights or…

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6877

Abstract

Much of the debate on the alleged evils and merits of globalization has been based on after‐the‐fact argument. Depending on the protagonist’s viewpoint, the delights or, more often, the miseries of civil society, especially in developing countries, have been attributed to globalization, This paper takes a different approach to examine the effects of globalization. It starts by examining globalization as a corporate strategy. What is it? What is driving it? What practices characterize a globalization strategy? What advantages does it bring to the corporation? The implications of globalization practices are then examined to discover whether they necessarily cause good or harm to civil society, with particular emphasis on developing countries. It concludes that globalization can lead to benefits or harms, depending on the interrelationship of how it is practiced and the contexts of host countries. Globalization, like all strategies, is essentially amoral, concentrating on economic objectives. However, moral objectives and corporate social responsibility can become an inherent part of a globalization strategy if these social goods also satisfy corporate economic aims. Such a state of affairs should be encouraged, since it would tip the balance in favor of beneficial effects of globalization strategies.

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Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2021

Asahita Dhandhania and Eleanor O'Higgins

The purpose of this study is to examine the ways that sin industry companies attempt to utilise CSR reporting for legitimation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the ways that sin industry companies attempt to utilise CSR reporting for legitimation.

Design/methodology/approach

Conventional and summative content analyses were carried out on annual CSR reports in UK tobacco and gambling companies, juxtaposed against analysis of the actual behaviour of the companies, collectively and individually.

Findings

The paper concludes that there is an ongoing tension between the business of sin industry companies and their attempts to establish and maintain any legitimacy, using CSR reporting in particular ways to try to prove their credentials to society and to engage salient stakeholder support. Ultimately, they aim to give themselves the scope for strategic choice to enable survival and financial flourishing.

Research limitations/implications

Further research on CSR on other sin industries and in other jurisdictions with different regulatory situations could shed further light on the achievement or denial of different types of legitimacy. Studying different time periods as industries change would be of value.

Practical implications

On a practical basis, the study offers guidelines to stakeholders on the use of CSR reports from sin companies, and suggests the establishment of objective external CSR reports, overseen by accounting regulators.

Social implications

The paper provides an overview of the role of sin industries in society, and mitigating their harms.

Originality/value

This study allowed for a comprehensive, dynamic and inclusive understanding of the interplay of CSR reporting and legitimacy by addressing conflicting interests between sin companies' social effects and inherent activities at the industry level. The methodology of multiple case study design in two sin industries combined content analysis of CSR reports, juxtaposed against analysis of behaviour in context. Previous research included the juxtaposition of actuality in analysis of only single case studies or particular issues. Thus, this research allows for a broader industry understanding. On a practical basis, the study offers guidelines to stakeholders on the use of CSR reports from sin companies, and suggests the establishment of objective external CSR reports, overseen by accounting regulators. At the social level, the paper provides an overview of sin industries in society, and mitigating their harms.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2017

Eleanor R. E. O’Higgins

This chapter discusses the special case of extractive industries in relation to susceptibility to corruption, especially in states with weak institutional and governance…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the special case of extractive industries in relation to susceptibility to corruption, especially in states with weak institutional and governance structures. The systemic nature of this corruption is shown in a vicious cycle of extractive resource dependency and corruption which reinforce each other. The chapter then concentrates on the supply side of corruption, and the role of the private sector with domestic and foreign natural resources companies feeding into systemic corruption. Corruption is underpinned by a high demand, high prices for extractive resources scenario, and mitigated by a low demand, low prices scenario. Transparency oriented, anticorruption measures may not be effective in their own right, but a low demand, low prices scenario could provide an opening for such measures to take root, with accompanying benefits to the citizens of resource rich states and their environment. This suggests taking a contingency approach to dealing with corruption.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Eleanor O’Higgins

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297

Abstract

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Eleanor R.E. O'Higgins and Joseph W. Morgan

To study relationships between focal organisations and their stakeholders in a generic way, beyond the agency/transaction cost approach usually used in business research…

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1652

Abstract

Purpose

To study relationships between focal organisations and their stakeholders in a generic way, beyond the agency/transaction cost approach usually used in business research. The domain was political parties and their stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Study participants were officials and activists in five major Irish political parties. They were asked to nominate their most important stakeholders, to rate these stakeholders on salience as represented by power, legitimacy and urgency and to describe extent and intensity of their party engagement with these stakeholders.

Findings

Stakeholders considered more important to the organisation receive higher levels of engagement from the parties than those stakeholders thought to be less critical. The results suggest that high levels of stakeholder engagement can yield beneficial electoral results for political parties. The importance of looking after “internal stakeholders” is also supported. The three attributes of power, legitimacy and urgency do not seem to describe completely the salience of stakeholders to all organisations in a generic sense. The adequacy of the three attributes is most supported in mainstream organisations with a focused pragmatic orientation toward “winning”. However, it appears that more ideologically oriented organisations may assign higher salience to stakeholders who fit their ideology, as opposed to those who possess power, legitimacy and urgency.

Research limitations/implications

The ideological dimension of stakeholder salience which emerged in this study is worthy of further exploration, especially in its implications for actual stakeholder engagement and behaviour with respect to corporate social responsibility.

Practical implications

In the business arena – the study suggests that high levels of stakeholder engagement can yield beneficial results. It also demonstrates the importance of looking after internal stakeholders.

Originality/value

Discovery of dynamics between a focal organisation and its stakeholders in a more generic way than offered in traditional business research.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Yvon Pesqueux

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282

Abstract

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Sharon Gyves and Eleanor O'Higgins

The objective of this paper is to investigate the benefits arising from various corporate social responsibility (CSR) approaches, to determine which approach generated the…

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9579

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to investigate the benefits arising from various corporate social responsibility (CSR) approaches, to determine which approach generated the most sustainable mutual benefit accruing both to the focal firm, as well as to society and the firm's stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The ethnographic case studies are based on interviews with senior managers from six companies which are members of Business in the Community Ireland, a not‐for‐profit organization comprised of companies which are active about CSR initiatives.

Findings

Results show that for the companies interviewed, CSR initiatives that are voluntary and strategic, as opposed to coerced and/or non‐strategic, generate the most sustainable mutual benefit to the firm itself and its social beneficiaries.

Originality/value

The paper presents a framework to analyze approaches to CSR, using the dimensions of strategic/non‐strategic, voluntary/coerced. The study discovers ways to reconcile the conventionally competing shareholder and stakeholder mindsets. The paper concludes that if firms pursue CSR activities in a voluntary and strategic manner they can satisfy both shareholders' and stakeholders' demands.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Steven Bonner and Eleanor O'Higgins

This paper aims to examine the issue of illegal downloading of music under an ethical lens.

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12293

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the issue of illegal downloading of music under an ethical lens.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework observed was one which included three independent variables: individual, situational and experimental elements. The dependent variable of the study was legal vs illegal downloading of music. A 20‐item questionnaire was completed by 84 respondents. The final four questions in the study were guilt‐inducing questions (which the respondent was informed of in compliance with ethical primary research); the remainder of the questions were neutral in nature.

Findings

The paper finds that the respondents illegally download despite viewing the act as immoral. Respondents choose to morally disengage from the non‐ethical nature of the act in an attempt to avoid feeling guilty about illegal downloading and also to avoid any blame being attributed to them personally. Many respondents feel the act of illegal downloading is simply today's reality and that there is nothing wrong or immoral about illegal downloading. Those who illegally download were less likely to attack the activity for being wrong. Active music fans were more likely to engage in illegal downloading than passive ones. Being a student versus being gainfully employed did not affect downloading behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study was the difficulty in getting people to disclose the truth about their own ethical violations. A related limitation was the difficulty in obtaining respondents, since participation in such a study meant revealing their music consumption behaviour. However, in the end, social networking proved to be a successful way of recruiting participants.

Practical implications

The results cast light on the obstacles managers in the music business face in eliminating music piracy.

Social implications

The results show the reasons for the difficulties in eliminating this widespread crime, because of the ethical ambiguity involved.

Originality/value

The study has the effect of explaining music piracy very clearly through the application of ethical/psychological theory. This has not been done before.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 48 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Cheok San Lam and Eleanor R.E. O'Higgins

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interrelated influences of managers' emotional intelligence, leadership styles and employee outcomes. In particular, this study…

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15804

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interrelated influences of managers' emotional intelligence, leadership styles and employee outcomes. In particular, this study aims to explore the potential mediating effects of managers' transformational leadership style on the relationships between managers' emotional intelligence and employee outcomes of: employee performance, job satisfaction, organisational commitment and job stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in two large organisations in Shanghai, China, on a sample of 323 participants, including both managers and subordinate employees. Emotional intelligence was measured by using the Wong Emotional Intelligence Scale (WEIS), and leadership style, using the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ‐5x Short).

Findings

The results showed that managers' transformational leadership style fully mediates the relationship between managers' emotional intelligence and employee job satisfaction. However, no mediating effect of managers' transformational leadership style is found on the relationship between managers' emotional intelligence and employee performance, organizational commitment and job stress.

Originality/value

The results of this study contribute to current insights about the interrelationships on managers' emotional intelligence, leadership style and employee outcomes, showing that the power of managers' emotional intelligence on job satisfaction must be expressed through a third mediating variable, transformational leadership.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2017

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Business and Corruption
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-445-7

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