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Abstract

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Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article

Eleanor Doyle and Mauricio Perez Alaniz

Whereas in developed countries, sustainability primarily focuses on environmental topics, in developing countries the issues of poverty, development and equity are…

Abstract

Purpose

Whereas in developed countries, sustainability primarily focuses on environmental topics, in developing countries the issues of poverty, development and equity are equally, if not more, important. The purpose of this paper is to apply measures of social and environmental sustainability to assess sustainable development for the period 2005–2015 across a sample of 94 countries for which relevant data are available. Countries include two groups: developed and developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the index-based approach introduced by the World Economic Forum in its Global Competitiveness Project, a range of indicators are collected for estimating trends in both social and environmental sustainability. For the panel of data identified, a dynamic panel data estimator method is applied to the data set constructed. This paper presents the empirical results identifying key competitiveness factors related to social and environmental sustainability (separately and combining both aspects in a comprehensive sustainability framework).

Findings

This study explores how sustainable competitiveness offers a comprehensive assessment of the inter-related dynamics of the social, the environmental and economic building blocks of sustainable development simultaneously. Performance impacts are found to differ substantially across two groups of countries depending on their development level. This highlights the challenges in shaping and achieving sustainable development goals.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this research is novel in examining the intersections between economic competitiveness and environmental and social sustainability addressing an identified research gap. In addition, the paper investigates the most important competitiveness pillars focusing on both strengths and weaknesses in sustainable competitiveness across developed and developing countries.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article

Stephen Brosnan, Eleanor Doyle and Sean O’Connor

The purpose of this paper is to offer clarity on a central concept introduced in Porter’s The Competitive Advantage of Nations, i.e. the cluster. The authors situate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer clarity on a central concept introduced in Porter’s The Competitive Advantage of Nations, i.e. the cluster. The authors situate the concept introduced by Porter (1990) relative to two of its antecedents, the industrial district and industrial complex. Placing the cluster in a historical context permits consideration of the extent to which it, as a concept for analysis, may be differentiated from other geography-based approaches to economic phenomena. In this way, this paper examines the added value of the cluster concept derived from economic factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a detailed literature review tracing the evolution of theories of location and agglomeration into which Porter’s cluster fits. The evolution of Porter’s own conceptualisation of the cluster and how this relates to theoretical clarity surrounding the concept is explored. Comparative analysis of theories of location, agglomeration and clustering is provided to identify similarities and differences across the approaches and identify the added value of the cluster concept in relation to other approaches.

Findings

Clustering represents a process associated with spatial organisational form which may offer advantages in efficiency, effectiveness and flexibility. Cluster benefits can be appreciated through the lens of Young’s (1928) identified sources of increasing returns. A key aspect in clustering is revealed in terms of its role in enabling four sources of increasing returns. The authors outline how these sources of increasing returns are related to “soft” processes of networking, interaction and individual and collective learning. Porter’s Diamond is a self-reinforcing system which can permit increasing returns and reinforce such tendencies of economic activity within agglomerations.

Originality/value

Added value from Porter’s cluster concept is identified in the context of both its locational anchoring and in terms of its potential for understanding the role of exploitation of increasing returns for development. This points to the importance of focusing on clustering as a process rather than on cluster within typologies of organisational form. This implies that the nature of relationships (and how they change) within and across markets, institutions and actors lies at the heart of clustering because of their roles in knowledge-generation, including innovation, knowledge sharing and upgrading.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article

Zheng Chen, Eleanor Doyle and Connell Fanning

Penrose introduced the concept of “unused services” which she identified as the internal inducement to firm growth. The purpose of this paper is to explore “unused…

Abstract

Purpose

Penrose introduced the concept of “unused services” which she identified as the internal inducement to firm growth. The purpose of this paper is to explore “unused services”, insufficiently examined in the literature to date, by applying Eastern conceptual thinking to refine Penrose's arguments.

Design/methodology/approach

The centrality of “unused services” to Penrose's theory is highlighted. The rationale for a general propensity of entrepreneurial managers to overlook the generation of such services in practice is developed and two Chinese concepts (Xing and Shi from Sun Tzu) are employed to work through their implications for Penrose's concept.

Findings

The continuous availability of unused services represents the firm's propensity to grow (Shi) and is derived from the disposition of existing resources (Xing). The authors' cross‐cultural perspective highlights the fundamental and inherent force governing the growth of the firm as the process through which the management team makes meaning of existing and potential productive resources to explore and exploit their unused services.

Practical implications

Greater focus is required on the relationship between a firm's physical resources and the thinking and sense‐making of its managers. The art of achieving growth from a firm's productive resources arises from the meaning‐making capability and progression in managerial thinking of the management team, facilitating its members to “see” and exploit the inherent force for growth available in unused services.

Originality/value

The paper's cross‐cultural perspective permits refinement of Penrose's theory true to her focus on the inherent incentives and constraints on firm growth. Thus, thinking is advanced in terms of exploring the dominant factor governing the identification of potential productive opportunities within firms, i.e. their source of growth. Implications for practice are provided in the research agenda.

Details

Journal of Knowledge-based Innovation in China, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1418

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Article

Eleanor Doyle and Eoin O’Leary

New evidence is presented on the degree of aggregate and sectoral labour productivity convergence among 11 EU countries between 1970 and 1990. As with studies for other…

Abstract

New evidence is presented on the degree of aggregate and sectoral labour productivity convergence among 11 EU countries between 1970 and 1990. As with studies for other groups of countries, it is found that there is a greater degree of aggregate than sectoral convergence. Aggregate productivity converged at 0.9 percent per annum, with agriculture and manufacturing both diverging and only services converging (0.6 percent p.a.). We contend that structural change provides one explanation for this finding. When measured as changes in sectoral employment shares, structural change accounted for between 50 percent and 66 percent of the overall rate of aggregate productivity convergence among the EU countries over the period. Countries with relatively low levels of aggregate productivity benefited most from structural change.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Abstract

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article

Abstract

Details

Journal of Knowledge-based Innovation in China, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1418

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Article

Eleanor Doyle

The secular transformation in Irish sectoral employment shares, which has been stimulated by the change in focus of both Irish industrial and trade policies, mirrors the…

Abstract

The secular transformation in Irish sectoral employment shares, which has been stimulated by the change in focus of both Irish industrial and trade policies, mirrors the significant changes that have occurred in international structures of production. Estimates the contribution of changes in Ireland’s sectoral employment structure to labour productivity convergence between Ireland and the EU average from 1970‐1990. Identifies the variation in Irish sectoral employment distribution over time as a significant source of labour productivity convergence. Ireland’s labour productivity convergence was 0.3 per cent per annum higher as a result of shifts in Irish employment distribution than would have occurred without changes in the structure of Irish employment.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 24 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article

Eleanor Doyle

The purpose of this paper is to explain the competitiveness obstacles that European businesses face, which, if not addressed, limit the potential of the EU economy

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the competitiveness obstacles that European businesses face, which, if not addressed, limit the potential of the EU economy, particularly in terms of the Lisbon goals. Adopting a broadly defined compliance‐centred approach, the paper seeks to identify how some significant competitiveness obstacles of European business might best be addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews in 44 multinational and medium‐sized companies were used to investigate compliance requirements, the tools and methods used to manage compliance, compliance‐related obstacles to competitiveness. A survey of four European Information Centres was conducted to evaluate their effectiveness in achieving their stated mission.

Findings

Organisations lacked systems to proactively manage compliance to allow them to deepen or sustain their competitive positioning. Companies were concerned with the reliability and comprehensiveness of reports on compliance risks and how these could be related to prioritised strategic goals. A gap was identified between regulation production and dissemination, and conversion of regulatory information into knowledge used to gain and maintain business advantage. This gap is inadequately filled by business supports, including the European Information Centres.

Originality/value

The business‐focused approach to managing compliance suggested here could increase the competitiveness of EU businesses and the EIC Network is potentially well positioned to play its part in the value‐adding process of both the providers and consumers of EU information.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Book part

Denis Harrington, Margaret Walsh, Eleanor Owens, David John Joyner, Morag McDonald, Gareth Griffiths, Evelyn Doyle and Patrick Lynch

Adopting an EU policy lens, this chapter primarily addresses the proposed pivotal role of firm-level innovation capability (FLIC) in small and medium-sized enterprises…

Abstract

Adopting an EU policy lens, this chapter primarily addresses the proposed pivotal role of firm-level innovation capability (FLIC) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) as a stimulant of sustainable development (SD) and green growth in Ireland/Wales. The chapter specifically examines the scale and scope of the green economy (GE), and considers the importance of organizational inherent “green” innovation capabilities (GICs) to achieve it. Underpinning the study is the methodology and concept of utilizing a facilitated cross-border multi-stakeholder learning network to enable knowledge transfer and exchange practices to flourish between partners, acting as a significant predictor of the development of SME GICs structures. Specifically, against the backdrop of the Green Innovation and Future Technologies (“GIFT” hereafter) INTERREG 4A Project, the research assesses how academic–industry partner exchange and inter-group learning and cooperation facilitates the development of GICs in smaller enterprises to realize a sustainable smart green economy in Ireland.

Details

University Partnerships for International Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-301-6

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