Search results

1 – 10 of 18
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Eleanna Galanaki and Nancy Papalexandris

The purpose of this paper is to identify the challenges posed to business leaders from major global demographic changes expected in the workforce composition, such as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the challenges posed to business leaders from major global demographic changes expected in the workforce composition, such as higher participation of women and more active involvement of elder and more experienced people in the future workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors ran a survey among 733 middle managers, focusing on their ideal leadership behavior. The Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior project methodology was applied for data collection and analyses.

Findings

Several significant differences were established in leadership ideals according to gender, age and managerial experience. The differences based on gender had higher practical significance than the ones based on age and experience of the respondents.

Research limitations/implications

The paper adds up to the pertinent in the implicit leadership approach dialogue over the existence of stable, global and unchanging aspects of leadership.

Practical implications

Leader behaviors traditionally deemed as positive, such as the participative and charismatic/value-based leadership, are shown to be critical for the future business leader. Leadership development in organizations should focus on these two aspects.

Social implications

Leaders who can meet the expectations of diverse groups of people will be able to achieve inclusion of least privileged groups at the business level, leading to higher inclusion at the social, aggregate level.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to explore how documented demographic trends could affect the way that leadership will evolve in the near future.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 October 2019

Eleanna Galanaki

Employee benefits represent a large proportion of operational costs in most sectors, but discussions of their outcomes have been inconclusive. The purpose of this paper is…

1375

Abstract

Purpose

Employee benefits represent a large proportion of operational costs in most sectors, but discussions of their outcomes have been inconclusive. The purpose of this paper is to decipher the effects of employee benefits on organizational commitment in a changing and largely uncertain environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Three repeated large-scale surveys in Greece during the recent recession are used (2012, 2013 and 2015, total n=3,498).

Findings

A new taxonomy of employee benefits based on employees’ subjective utility evaluations is developed and applied. Availability of benefits and changes in the allocation policies of benefits are found to significantly but not powerfully influence organizational commitment. The setting in which this exchange is realized is critical for the relationships developed.

Research limitations/implications

The study is conducted in a single country during the recession and trough phases of the business cycle and employee benefit allocation is measured with employee perceptions. Future research is called to couple present findings with international research at diverse phases of the business cycle and objective or company-provided measures of employee benefits.

Practical implications

Employers are advised to draft long-term employee benefit strategies, avoid frequent adjustments and provide multiple types of employee benefits, to increase affective organizational commitment.

Originality/value

This is the first time employee benefits are treated as a whole, and effects of their allocation and of changes in their allocation are explored at the employee level.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2020

Eleanna Galanaki

Employee benefits, a critical element of total employee rewards, are important for both employers and employees. This study aims to explore the utility of employee…

Abstract

Purpose

Employee benefits, a critical element of total employee rewards, are important for both employers and employees. This study aims to explore the utility of employee benefits for male and female employees during the recent economic recession. In doing so, it intends to highlight an indirect deterioration of employment arrangements and equality in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the findings of three repeated large-scale surveys during the Greek crisis (2012-2015, total N = 3,498).

Findings

Employees report that the availability of employee benefits has decreased during the recession and that women find more utility in them than men do. Additionally, women seem to be affected more than men by decreases in employee benefits allocation.

Research limitations/implications

The present findings support calls for contingent employee reward allocation.

Practical implications

Employers wishing to sustain their competitive advantage by fostering inclusion and diversity and/or employers with a high female employee ratio are encouraged to consider increasing their employee benefits portfolio.

Social implications

The recent economic crisis and the subsequent recession have brought about several potential negative effects, in terms of the employment conditions for women. Decreased employee benefits are a hidden negative effect of the recession for female employees and it presents multiple, potential and unforeseen consequences for gender diversity and inclusion.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study to address non-monetary employee remuneration under the lens of gender pay differentials. It does so in a turbulent macro-economic setting.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2018

Nikolaos Pahos and Eleanna Galanaki

Staffing is a tool that employers use to decrease information asymmetry when hiring employees. However, how staffing effectiveness evolves according to employee…

2346

Abstract

Purpose

Staffing is a tool that employers use to decrease information asymmetry when hiring employees. However, how staffing effectiveness evolves according to employee demographic characteristics has not been thoroughly elucidated to date. The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a model linking staffing practices, age and employee performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a stratified sample of 1,254 employees, the authors hypothesize: the main effects of staffing practices on employee performance, the main effects of age on employee performance and the moderating effects of age on the relationship between staffing practices and employee performance.

Findings

The results show significant positive effects of staffing and age on employee performance and a negative moderating effect of age on the abovementioned relationship.

Practical implications

The organizations are urged to invest in recruitment and selection practices and implement focused practices that appeal to an aging workforce.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to explore the topic of aging workforce and the efficiency of staffing practices on employee performance in the context of the Greek labor force. The authors discuss the results, theoretical contributions, practical implications and future research directions in light of the challenge of managing an aging workforce.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Shefali Nandan, Daphne Halkias, Paul W. Thurman, Marcos Komodromos, Baker Ahmad Alserhan, Chris Adendorff, Norashfah Hanim Yaakop Yahaya Alhaj, Alfredo De Massis, Eleanna Galanaki, Norma Juma, Eileen Kwesiga, Anayo D. Nkamnebe and Claire Seaman

The purpose of this paper is to examine affective commitment, normative commitment, and continuance commitment in a cross-national context to identify if the effect of…

1472

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine affective commitment, normative commitment, and continuance commitment in a cross-national context to identify if the effect of country-specific cultural orientation on organizational commitment of faculty in higher education functions invariably in different countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The work expands on Meyer and Allen’s (1991) three-component model of organizational commitment. It includes relevant literature review on ten countries and the results of a survey of university faculty members, assessing their institutions’ human resources practices and their effect on organizational commitment. Basic descriptive statistics were performed on nominal and interval data, means, medians, and standard deviations were computed, and tests of mean equivalence, including ANOVA tests, were performed. In certain instances, Pearson and Spearman correlations were computed to ascertain correlation, and χ2 tests for randomized response were used, while Cronbach’s α test helped to establish survey instrument validity.

Findings

Though certain differences may exist between different countries and cultures with respect to the three-component model of organizational commitment, there is strong evidence of the existence of invariance and, thus, generalizability of the model across cultures.

Research limitations/implications

Cultural studies have focused on differences in organizational commitment at national levels. Further attempts to identify the universality of factors leading to organizational commitment should account for culture in the study of employee-related globalization issues in higher education institutes. Knowledge of cultural impact is also useful from a managerial perspective, and for the design of relevant strategies.

Practical implications

National context plays a major role in shaping the nature of educational institutions. This study brings out the need for a deeper understanding of invariance in organizational commitment (inter-alia, through the three-component model).

Originality/value

This study contributes to a better understanding of the relationship between organizational commitment and its various antecedents, including human resources management practices, for faculty in higher education institutes.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Leda Panayotopoulou, Maria Vakola and Eleanna Galanaki

This paper attempts to investigate the transformation in the role of the HR function in Greek firms, as a result of the use of internet and technology.

9583

Abstract

Purpose

This paper attempts to investigate the transformation in the role of the HR function in Greek firms, as a result of the use of internet and technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on both quantitative and qualitative methodology. A survey and focus groups took place in order to meet research objectives.

Findings

This paper examines and discusses the development of e‐HR use in Greece and the reasons for adoption of e‐HR practices focusing on strategy, process and HRM issues. Findings show that e‐HR facilitates the transformation of HRM role into a more strategic one. Driving forces and critical success factors of e‐HR adoption and implementation are identified and discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Limits its usefulness to countries that experience a stage of HRM professionalisation and technological development similar to that of Greece.

Practical implications

Identifies critical success factors in e‐HR adoption as well as main problems associated with it.

Originality/value

Qualitative results provided by the focus groups give an illustrative picture of the companies presented.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Nancy Papalexandris and Eleanna Galanaki

The purpose of this study is to identify similarities and differences between the leadership practices of managing entrepreneurs and professional CEOs and to investigate…

9461

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify similarities and differences between the leadership practices of managing entrepreneurs and professional CEOs and to investigate how these impact on their immediate subordinates' satisfaction, commitment, motivation, and effectiveness (engagement).

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple‐respondents survey, aiming at CEOs and their immediate subordinates, was conducted. Factor analysis, correlations and moderated regression analysis were used in order to reach conclusions.

Findings

Two leadership dimensions are found to be most influential: being a good manager/mentor and articulating vision. Although good manager/mentor characteristics prove crucial for both types of CEOs, the effect of vision articulation on subordinates is moderated by the type of company the CEO is leading. No significant differences are found in the leadership style that the two types of CEOs adopt, except for their calmness and self‐possession, which is lower among entrepreneurs.

Practical implications

The findings raise questions regarding the differences in subordinate expectations from owners – CEOs, as opposed to professional CEOs; and point at certain characteristics which could be developed in order to enhance leadership effectiveness in both groups of top managers.

Originality/value

The study underlines the importance of sound vision development and articulation in entrepreneur‐run firms, as it appears that people working for such firms expect more direction from the Head. It is also sustained that good management and mentoring are essential in any kind of firm, in order to develop an effective, committed and motivated top management team, which will bring corporate success.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Eleanna Galanaki

Online recruitment is a new tool, at the disposal of the HR departments, which has known a phenomenal success in very short time. This paper presents the findings of some…

22802

Abstract

Online recruitment is a new tool, at the disposal of the HR departments, which has known a phenomenal success in very short time. This paper presents the findings of some descriptive research, involving UK IT companies. The research tries to identify the effect that the perceived attributes of the practice have on the decision of companies to recruit through the Internet. The attributes tested are cost effectiveness; recruitment cycle time; response rate; quality of response; impact on the image of the company; targeting of specific niches; targeting of the passive job‐seeker; worldwide coverage; necessary resources, time and effort to implement; attractiveness of the mean to the job seekers (especially IT professionals and young graduates); risk of overload of answers; and impact of the size and reputation of the company. The paper provides an insight on how the companies perceive and value online recruitment.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Eleni Apospori, Nancy Papalexandris and Eleanna Galanaki

To shed some light on the motivational profile of entrepreneurial as opposed to professional CEOs in Greece.

3310

Abstract

Purpose

To shed some light on the motivational profile of entrepreneurial as opposed to professional CEOs in Greece.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on McClelland's motivational patterns, i.e. power, achievement and affiliation, as well as responsibility; interviews with Greek entrepreneurial and professional CEOs were conducted. Then, interviews were content‐analysed, in order to identify differences in motivational profiles of those two groups of CEOs.

Findings

Achievement, motivation and responsibility were found to be the most significant discriminating factors between entrepreneurial and professional CEOs.

Research limitations/implications

The current research focuses only on McClelland's typology. Other aspects affecting entrepreneurial inclination are not studied in the current paper.

Practical implications

One of the major implications deriving from the identified characteristics of successful entrepreneurial and professional CEOs has to do with the preparation and training of young leaders for both larger and smaller firms.

Originality/value

This paper studies, for the first time, the leadership profile of CEOs in Greece and identifies differences between professional and entrepreneurial ones. This is of great value in an SMEs dominated economy, such as Greece, where these research findings can be used for the development of entrepreneurship.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

1 – 10 of 18