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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Sharmistha Self and Subhasree Basuroy

The primary objective of this paper is to identify and analyze factors that influence choice and quality of healthcare of the elderly population in two northern and two…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary objective of this paper is to identify and analyze factors that influence choice and quality of healthcare of the elderly population in two northern and two southern states in India. The purpose of this paper is to look beyond the obvious factors that influence choice and therefore the quality of healthcare and seek to find whether there are some additional indirect factors that also influence choice and quality of healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilizes data from the Longitudinal Aging Study in India pilot project, which was a cross-sectional survey of men and women aged 45 and over focusing on two northern states (Punjab and Rajasthan) and two southern states (Kerala and Karnataka). In this paper the authors carry out a Probit analysis to estimate the factors that influence the elderly’s choice of healthcare.

Findings

The authors find that social activity via different types of social interactions outside the home and access to a phone (which is one of the cheapest and most commonly used methods of communication used by people in India) are statistically significant in influencing better quality of healthcare for the elderly. Moreover, gender-segregated results suggest that social activity is particularly important for elderly females. Relative price of healthcare is also an important determinant of the quality of healthcare sought. The authors also find some consistent regional influences on healthcare choices by the elderly.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is the data itself which is cross-sectional in nature. However, as further rounds of survey are conducted the authors hope to be able to build on the results of this paper using a longitudinal approach. A second limitation is the lack of variables available for carrying out an instrumental variables analysis. The results imply that elderly males and females are influenced by different things when it comes to healthcare choices. Thus for policy to be effective, the government needs to pursue avenues that would be most likely to succeed.

Practical implications

One of the most important practical implications of this research is the understanding that informal channels of knowledge transmission are important especially for the elderly in India. Traditional methods of knowledge transmission such as education, media, and income are less likely to be effective in a country where majority of the people are illiterate and poor. Social interactions appear to be most effective in influencing healthcare choices of elderly females.

Social implications

The most obvious social implications of this paper are the importance of social interactions via social activities outside the home and ability for social communication via access to a phone for the elderly population in India to make better healthcare choices and therefore receive better healthcare.

Originality/value

The literature on elderly healthcare is limited when it comes to developing countries. What makes matters worse for India is that up until recently there have been no comprehensive efforts to collect reliable data on the elderly population in India. As a result there is extremely limited availability of policy-relevant research dedicated to issues relating to the older population. Most of the existing literature looks at self-reported health and healthcare status or utilization. This paper would be among the first to address factors influencing quality of healthcare received by the elderly population in India.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Bennie Wong, G.T.S. Ho and Eric Tsui

In view of the elderly caregiving service being in high demand nowadays, the purpose of this paper is to develop an intelligent e-healthcare system for the domestic care…

Abstract

Purpose

In view of the elderly caregiving service being in high demand nowadays, the purpose of this paper is to develop an intelligent e-healthcare system for the domestic care industry by using the Internet of Things (IoTs) and Fuzzy Association Rule Mining (FARM) approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The IoTs connected with the e-healthcare system collect real-time vital sign monitoring data for the e-healthcare system. The FARM approach helps to identify the hidden relationships between the data records in the e-healthcare system to support the elderly care management tasks.

Findings

To evaluate the proposed system and approach, a case study was carried out to identify the association between the specific collected demographic data, behavior data and the health measurements data in the e-healthcare system. It is found that the discovered rules are useful for the care management tasks in the elderly healthcare service.

Originality/value

Knowledge discovery in databases uses various data mining techniques and rule-based artificial intelligence algorithms. This paper demonstrates complete processes on how an e-healthcare system connected with IoTs can support the elderly care services via a data collection phase, data analysis phase and data reporting phase by using the FARM to evaluate the fuzzy sets of the data attributes. The caregivers can use the discovered rules for proactive decision support of healthcare services and to improve the overall service quality by enhancing the elderly healthcare service responsiveness.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Ching-Min Chen and Baithesda Baithesda

The purpose of this study is to examine different types of primary healthcare utilization and its influencing factors among the elderly in Indonesia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine different types of primary healthcare utilization and its influencing factors among the elderly in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from the 5th Indonesian Family Life Survey, a longitudinal database of demography and health information using multistage stratified sampling of households. Older adults aged at least 60 years were sampled; proxy respondents and incomplete data were excluded from the study.

Findings

Most of the elderly preferred to visit nurse/midwives practitioner (NP), followed by the community health centers (CHC). Those who lived outside of the Java region were more likely to visit NP; moreover, those without formal education and lived in the rural area were more likely to use CHC. Education level, region and chronic conditions were significant predicting factors for almost all types of primary healthcare use.

Social implications

Indonesia is moving towards an aged society in the coming decades. However, there are significant barriers to access almost all types of primary health care by the elderly in Indonesia. This shows the possibility of health care inequality for the elderly population. This study provides evidence of the various types of primary healthcare use by the elderly and its influencing factors. It hopes policymakers can use the data to develop an effective strategy to enhance the quality of primary healthcare services provides to the elderly population.

Originality/value

Indonesian nurses fulfill vital functions in the health system and are often the only human resource for health not only in remote and poor rural areas but also in urban areas. Nurses, as a part of primary care providers, require an adequately trained to contribute to the better primary care system.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Hui Lu, Wei Wang, Ling Xu, Zhenhong Li, Yan Ding, Jian Zhang and Fei Yan

The Chinese population is rapidly ageing before they are rich. The purpose of this paper is to describe healthcare seeking behaviour and the critical factors associated…

Abstract

Purpose

The Chinese population is rapidly ageing before they are rich. The purpose of this paper is to describe healthcare seeking behaviour and the critical factors associated with healthcare seeking behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a purposive sampling method, the authors recruited 44 adults aged 60 years or older from three provinces, representing the developed (Shanghai), undeveloped (Ningxia) regions and the regions in between (Hubei). From July to September 2008, using a semi-structured guide, the authors interviewed participants in focus group discussions.

Findings

The healthcare needs for chronic and catastrophic diseases were high; however, the healthcare demands were low and healthcare utilizations were even lower owing to the limited accessibility to healthcare services, particularly, in underdeveloped rural areas. “Too expensive to see a doctor” was a prime complaint, explaining substantial discrepancies between healthcare needs, demands and use. Care seeking behaviour varied depending on insurance availability, perceived performance, particularly hospital services, and prescription medications. Participants consistently rated increasing healthcare accessibility as a high priority, including offering financial aid, and improving service convenience. Improving social security fairness was the first on the elderly’s wish list.

Originality/value

Healthcare demand and use were lower than needs, and were influenced by multiple factors, primarily, service affordability and efficiency, perceived performance and hospital service quality.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Jiyoung Kim

The purpose of this paper is to identify customers’ service network partners in medical encounters and demonstrate the extent to which customers’ evaluation of each…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify customers’ service network partners in medical encounters and demonstrate the extent to which customers’ evaluation of each co-creation practice with their service network partners affects their perceived service quality and satisfaction. In addition, the moderating effect of patient age is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

By using a field survey, data collected from 164 inpatients were examined through structural equation modeling and multi-group analysis.

Findings

The value-creating activities of customers with service providers, companions and other customers during healthcare service encounters have a positive effect on their perception of service quality and satisfaction related to behavioral intentions. Co-creating with service value network partners has a greater impact on perceived service quality and service satisfaction for patients aged 60 or older.

Research limitations/implications

By focusing on participants in customers’ service value co-creating networks, this study contributes to the body of knowledge by confirming the importance of each actor and analyzing customers’ value co-creating activities.

Originality/value

This is the first study to show that when customers’ level of involvement is high, such as in healthcare services, their value-creating activities when interacting with medical staff, companions and other patients positively affect perceived service quality and satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Robert Bogue

This paper aims to provide details of European research projects and product developments involving robots that can assist the ageing population.

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382

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide details of European research projects and product developments involving robots that can assist the ageing population.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an introduction, the role of assistive robots and research into the nature of the human–robot interaction are considered. The paper then discusses a selection of European research projects and a number of companies producing or developing assistive robots. Finally, brief conclusions are drawn.

Findings

In recognition of the fact that the growing, ageing population has needs that place an unsustainable burden on carers and healthcare providers, Europe is investing heavily in assistive robots. Many European Union-funded, collaborative projects have been conducted and several continue today which build on the extensive body of earlier research. Significant progress is being made, and assistive robot research has moved on from purely technological developments to field trials involving real people in realistic environments. Several products exist or are at an advanced stage of development and have often benefited or arisen from these projects. Europe is in a very strong position to capitalise on this emerging market opportunity.

Originality/value

This provides a detailed insight into European assistive robot development activities.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Content available
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100

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

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305

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Sharmistha Self

The purpose of this paper is to take a close look at factors that influence the choice and quality of healthcare received by ailing and elderly people in rural north…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to take a close look at factors that influence the choice and quality of healthcare received by ailing and elderly people in rural north India. The author is primarily interested in seeing what role is played by the presence of sons in the family, particularly co-residence with sons. In the absence of some broad-based social security arrangement in countries like India, older adults traditionally turn to living arrangement where the older adults are supported by their children or extended family. In a patriarchal society as India, such responsibility lies with the sons if one has son/s. Such dependence on sons explains preferential treatment towards younger sons as a justification for the care parents receive from sons in their advanced years. This culture of son preference behavior provides the context for this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical model is based on testing three inter-related research questions. First, the author asks whether having grown sons or living with son/s leads to up-front better quality of healthcare for parents. If the empirical analysis does not show support for this research question, the author broadens the research question to ask whether those with grown son/s or those that live with their son/s have a higher probability of seeing a trained medical professional as compared to some traditional healer. If the empirical analysis does not support the second question, the author further broadens the research question and asks whether those elderly who are sick are more likely to receive any healthcare (medical or traditional) if they have grown son/s or live with their son/s.

Findings

The results show that co-residence with a son does not have a statistically significant impact on the quality of healthcare received by the elderly individual. Additionally, not having a son also does not have a statistically significant impact on quality of healthcare received.

Research limitations/implications

For the purpose of the empirical analysis, the author utilizes World Bank's Living Standard Measurement Survey (LSMS) data collected from rural villages in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar in India in 1997-1998. The dataset may be somewhat dated, but it provides relevant information which transcends time. Additionally, with economic growth and modernization, more and more young people in India have migrated away from rural areas in the recent decade. Thus, surveys carried out in the last decade by the National Family Health Surveys in India show very little evidence of elderly parent in rural areas living with their adult children. This practice seemed to be much more prevalent at the time of the LSMS survey of 1997-1998.

Practical implications

Contrary to popular expectation, the results show that co-residing with a son has no statistically significant impact on healthcare received by parents. Additionally, not having sons does not matter either.

Originality/value

The author finds relatively fewer studies done on factors that determine the choice of healthcare for the elderly, particularly relating to those that are ailing (for reasons other than simply aging) and with reference to their living arrangement. The present paper addresses this void in the literature and is expected to make a meaningful contribution in bridging this gap in the literature.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 40 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Jitse Jonne Schuurmans, Nienke van Pijkeren, Roland Bal and Iris Wallenburg

The purpose of this paper is to explore the formation and composition of “regions” as places of care, both empirically and conceptually.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the formation and composition of “regions” as places of care, both empirically and conceptually.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on action-oriented research involving experiments aimed at designing, implementing and evaluating promising solutions to the entwined problems of a burgeoning elderly population and an increasing shortage of medical staff. It draws on ethnographic research conducted in 14 administrative areas in the Netherlands, a total of 273 in-depth interviews and over 1,000 h of observations.

Findings

This research challenges the understanding of a healthcare region as a clearly bounded topological area. It shows that organizations and professionals collaborate in a variety of different networks, some conterminous with the administrative region established by policymakers and others not. These networks are by nature unstable and dynamic. Attempts to form new regional collaborations with neighbouring organizations are complicated by existing healthcare governance and accountability structures that position organizations as competitors.

Practical implications

Policymakers should take the pre-established partnerships of healthcare organizations into account before delineating the area in which regionalization is meant to take place. A better alignment of governance and accountability structures is also needed for regionalization to occur in healthcare.

Originality/value

This paper combines insights from valuation studies with sociogeographical literature and provides a framework for understanding the assembling and disassembling of “regions”.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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