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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2018

Elaine Campbell

The purpose of this paper is to offer an insight into mental health illness in academia, and its impact on academic identity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer an insight into mental health illness in academia, and its impact on academic identity.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts an evocative autoethnographic approach, utilising diary entries collected during the author’s three-month absence from her university due to depression and anxiety. A contemporary methodology, autoethnography seeks to use personal experience to provide a deeper understanding of culture. In this personal story, the author explores her decline in mental health and subsequent re-construction of her academic identity in order to enhance understanding of the organisational culture of higher education.

Findings

This paper illustrates how, rather than being an achievement, academic identity is an ongoing process of construction. Although mental health illness can contribute to a sense of loss of self, identity can be re-constructed during and after recovery. Autoethnographic explorations of depression and anxiety in higher education provide a deeper understanding of an often stigmatized issue, but researchers should be alive to the political and ethical pitfalls associated with deeply reflexive research.

Originality/value

There is little autoethnographic research on mental health illness in a university setting. This paper offers unique insights into the lived experience of depression and anxiety in the context of academic life, through the lens of academic identity.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Jeanette Henderson

The concept of care has attracted considerable policy and professional interest recently and there has been growing attention both to the needs of carers and how they may…

Abstract

The concept of care has attracted considerable policy and professional interest recently and there has been growing attention both to the needs of carers and how they may sometimes conflict with those of service users. This paper draws on initial research findings to examine experiences of care in mental health for men and women and for carers and users.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2006

Elaine D. Pulakos, David W. Dorsey and Susan S. White

Although models have been published in the literature covering various aspects of the job performance domain (e.g., technical performance, contextual performance)…

Abstract

Although models have been published in the literature covering various aspects of the job performance domain (e.g., technical performance, contextual performance), researchers have recently recognized a void in these models and have called for their expansion to include adaptive performance components (Campbell, 1999; Hesketh & Neal, 1999; London & Mone, 1999; Murphy & Jackson, 1999). Toward this end, Pulakos, Arad, Donovan, and Plamondon (2000) developed a taxonomy of adaptive job performance similar to the model of job performance developed by Campbell, McCloy, Oppler, and Sager (1993). This model contained eight dimensions of adaptive job performance. Pulakos et al. began their research with a review of various literatures on adaptability and identified six different aspects of adaptive performance. These are shown in Table 1, along with the research references from which they were derived. The diversity of substantive areas that are represented in the research articles cited in Table 1 is a testament to the perceived importance of adaptability across a number of behavioral disciplines. Although the idea that adaptive performance is multi-dimensional was reasonable based on the wide range of behaviors “adaptability” has encompassed in the literature (for example, adapting to organizational change, different cultures, different people, new technology), no published research prior to Pulakos et al. had systematically defined or empirically examined specific dimensions of adaptive job performance. Pulakos et al. conducted two studies to refine the six-dimension model of individual adaptive job performance derived from the literature. In Study 1, over 1,000 critical incidents from 21 different jobs were content analyzed, yielding an eight-dimension taxonomy of adaptive performance. That is, the critical incident analysis produced two additional adaptive performance dimensions that are shown at the bottom of Table 1.

Details

Understanding Adaptability: A Prerequisite for Effective Performance within Complex Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-371-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2009

Alison Lane and Elaine Shellard

All accountants make extensive use of information technology (IT) in their working lives, and IT skills have long been part of the Accounting and Finance undergraduate…

Abstract

All accountants make extensive use of information technology (IT) in their working lives, and IT skills have long been part of the Accounting and Finance undergraduate degree programme at the University of Glamorgan. This degree scheme was redesigned on a linear basis with effect from September 2002; one of the major changes being to integrate the teaching of management accounting and IT at the introductory level. The teaching of management accounting lends itself well to the use of IT. This paper describes both the rationale behind, and the design and development of, a case study which aims to integrate the use of IT with the development and application of management accounting techniques. The case study attempts to emulate a “ive” work‐based environment as closely as possible. Completion of tasks at intervals throughout the year form part of the assessment of the module. These are based on data from a variety of sources which students manipulate, using various software packages, in order to produce useful management accounting information. In this way, students learn both management accounting and IT skills, and how to apply these skills to provide management accounting information. The experiences of both students and staff in using the case study over a six‐year period are reported, together with a description of how the case study and its use have evolved in light of the experience.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Barbara Wildemuth, Luanne Freund and Elaine G. Toms

One core element of interactive information retrieval (IIR) experiments is the assignment of search tasks. The purpose of this paper is to provide an analytical review of…

Abstract

Purpose

One core element of interactive information retrieval (IIR) experiments is the assignment of search tasks. The purpose of this paper is to provide an analytical review of current practice in developing those search tasks to test, observe or control task complexity and difficulty.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 100 prior studies of IIR were examined in terms of how each defined task complexity and/or difficulty (or related concepts) and subsequently interpreted those concepts in the development of the assigned search tasks.

Findings

Search task complexity is found to include three dimensions: multiplicity of subtasks or steps, multiplicity of facets, and indeterminability. Search task difficulty is based on an interaction between the search task and the attributes of the searcher or the attributes of the search situation. The paper highlights the anomalies in our use of these two concepts, concluding with suggestions for future methodological research related to search task complexity and difficulty.

Originality/value

By analyzing and synthesizing current practices, this paper provides guidance for future experiments in IIR that involve these two constructs.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Sara Catalán, Eva Martínez and Elaine Wallace

This paper aims to explain the effect of flow, game repetition and brand familiarity on players’ brand attitude and purchase intention in the context of mobile advergaming.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain the effect of flow, game repetition and brand familiarity on players’ brand attitude and purchase intention in the context of mobile advergaming.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 227 participants who played a mobile advergame were analysed. Structural equation modelling with partial least squares was used to test the research model.

Findings

The results reveal that the independent variables (i.e. game repetition and brand familiarity) significantly influence the dependent variables explored in this study (i.e. brand attitude and purchase intentions of players). Results also show that brand familiarity influences players’ flow experience, which in turn significantly affects players’ purchase intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study are important for advertising practitioners and advergames’ developers as understanding the determinants of mobile advergaming effectiveness is crucial for designing successful advergames that persuade players the most.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature in two ways. First, it provides new insights into the effectiveness of mobile advergames, which is an under-researched area. Second, it offers empirical evidence of the effects of game repetition, flow and brand familiarity on mobile advergaming effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Elaine James, Chris Hatton and Rob Mitchell

Participation of people with learning disabilities in the United Kingdom (UK) Parliamentary Elections has previously been found to be lower than that of non-learning…

Abstract

Purpose

Participation of people with learning disabilities in the United Kingdom (UK) Parliamentary Elections has previously been found to be lower than that of non-learning disabled peers. This paper aims to consider whether an intervention to support the right to take part in democratic and political life may result in increased participation rates.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered by social workers from 135 learning disabled people about their voter registration and voting in the May 2019 UK local government election. Social workers subsequently ran a promote the vote campaign with this cohort and gathered the same data in respect of the December 2019 UK Parliamentary Election.

Findings

Following the campaign, there were statistically significant increases in both the proportion of people who registered to vote and in the proportion who voted.

Originality/value

People with learning disabilities are more likely to vote if made aware of their rights and supported to do so.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Elaine Anderson and Jill Davies

Highlights the prevalence, causes and health risks of obesity. Then continues by looking at the health incentives of weight loss through commercial weight‐reducing diets…

Abstract

Highlights the prevalence, causes and health risks of obesity. Then continues by looking at the health incentives of weight loss through commercial weight‐reducing diets and the health problems incurred during such a diet in respect of reduced energy intake and reduction of non‐starch polysaccharides which can lead to constipation and associated bowel diseases. Tips to increase the intake of non‐starch polysaccharides are given in the context of weight‐reduction programmes.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2019

Elaine M. Lasda

Abstract

Details

The New Metrics: Practical Assessment of Research Impact
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-269-6

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