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Article

Felicitas Ciabere Ratanya

The purpose of this paper is to examine the access and use of the institutional repository (IR) among academic staff at Egerton University.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the access and use of the institutional repository (IR) among academic staff at Egerton University.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a description of the building and development of the IR at the Egerton university and describes expected benefits of the repository to the University and relevant stakeholders. A survey was conducted among 84 academic staff with an aim of examining their levels of awareness on the existence of the IR at the Egerton University and assess their access and use. Through a structured questionnaire both quantitative and qualitative data were collected.

Findings

The study revealed that majority of the academic staff at the Egerton University are still not aware of the existence of the IR. Staff also faced challenges in accessing and using the content available. The paper provided suggestions on how best to enhance the access and utilization of the IRs among the academic staff.

Practical implications

From a practical point of view, the paper provides implications on the access and use of IRs by the academic staff. The paper points out some challenges faced by this group of users which other academic institutions may try to solve in their respective contexts.

Originality/value

Findings and discussions provided in the paper will pave way to solving the challenges faced in access and use of IR by the academic staff at the Egerton University.

Details

Library Management, vol. 38 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article

Patience Mlongo Mshenga, Mwanarusi Saidi, Agnes O. Nkurumwa, Juma Riziki Magogo and Shem Ipomai Oradu

The purpose of this paper is to determine the factors influencing adoption of African indigenous vegetables (AIVs) into the agro-pastoral farming systems aiming at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the factors influencing adoption of African indigenous vegetables (AIVs) into the agro-pastoral farming systems aiming at improving livelihoods.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based upon the diffusion theory which is linked to the random utility theory. A survey of 205 agro-pastoral households obtained through multistage sampling technique was used. Factors influencing adoption of AIVs were estimated using a logit model.

Findings

Findings indicate that the acreage under AIVs was still very low compared to other crop enterprises with the most common types of AIVs grown being Solanum nigrum, Amaranthus spp., Cucurbita maxima, Vigna unguiculata, Basella alba and Cleome gynandra. Factors influencing adoption were found to be gender, age, farm size, education level, off-farm income and number of visits to extension officer.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include reliance on respondents’ willingness to provide correct information.

Originality/value

This paper adds value in its contribution to literature on diversifying agro-pastoral livelihoods through production of AIVs for income and food security.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article

R.T. Mulimila

The information environment of a given society currently revolves around the ability to use and manipulate information technologies. This paper reviews the trend of…

Abstract

The information environment of a given society currently revolves around the ability to use and manipulate information technologies. This paper reviews the trend of information technology (IT) applications in East Africa government‐owned university libraries for the ten years 1987‐1997. By 1997, East Africa (Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda) had only eight government‐owned university libraries. The trend of IT applications in those libraries was surveyed using a questionnaire and review of available literature. It was revealed that the extent of IT applications in those libraries from 1987‐1997 was very limited. By 1997, only one government‐owned university library in East Africa had automated its library catalogue and books circulation control. Financial resources and lack of trained manpower in IT remained the most critical obstacles in the application of information technology in East Africa government‐owned university libraries.

Details

Library Review, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

Castro Ngumbu Gichuki, Milcah Mulu Mutuku and Lydia Nkatha Kinuthia

The purpose of this study is to investigate the inability to access affordable credit in Kenya which hinders many women entrepreneurs from either starting their own or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the inability to access affordable credit in Kenya which hinders many women entrepreneurs from either starting their own or expanding existing enterprises and capital base. The emergence of table banking groups attempts to fill the existing credit gap.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey involving 225 randomly selected women entrepreneurs who participate in table banking groups within Nakuru Municipality was conducted. Data collection comprised a questionnaire whose reliability coefficient was 0.83 at 0.05 confidence level.

Findings

Results indicated that a majority women entrepreneurs aged between 20 and 60 years with 71 per cent of them married. Further, 44 per cent had attained secondary-level education, while no illiterate entrepreneurs participated in the study. A positive increase in the number of employees, after members participated in table banking groups, was realized. Credit received from table banking influenced changes in the size of enterprises.

Originality/value

The study shows that availability, affordability and accessibility of credit from table banking groups led to positive growth of women-owned enterprises.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article

Mwangi Ndirangu and Maurice O. Udoto

The purpose of this article is to report findings on the perceptions of quality of educational facilities in Kenyan public universities, and the implications for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to report findings on the perceptions of quality of educational facilities in Kenyan public universities, and the implications for teaching/learning, and the learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted an exploratory descriptive design. A total of 332 and 107 undergraduate students and academic staff respectively from five public universities were randomly selected to participate in the study. The questionnaire was used for data collection.

Findings

The quality of the library, online resources and lecture facilities provided by Kenyan public universities did not meet quality measures of adequacy. They were unable to support the desired educational programmes effectively and facilitate the development of learning environments that support students and teachers in achieving their goals. The facilities were the antithesis of healthy and secure facilities that can provide a stimulating/inspirational setting for the users, critical measures of quality facilities.

Research limitations/implications

The study investigated the quality of learning resources from the perspectives of students and academic staff. Other stakeholders could have given additional perspectives not reported here.

Practical implications

Perceptions of quality of facilities indicated in this study show the need for university managers to focus on the improvement of the same if the quality of learning and learning environment were to be improved.

Social implications

Kenya's public universities can only develop the right calibre of manpower to meet the country's future needs by providing physical and other facilities that promote rigorous scholarship.

Originality/value

Improvement in quality of educational facilities is important for all interested in enhancing student learning and learning environment anywhere.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Content available
Article

Winifred Chepkoech, Nancy W. Mungai, Silke Stöber, Hillary K. Bett and Hermann Lotze-Campen

Understanding farmers’ perceptions of how the climate is changing is vital to anticipating its impacts. Farmers are known to take appropriate steps to adapt only when they…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding farmers’ perceptions of how the climate is changing is vital to anticipating its impacts. Farmers are known to take appropriate steps to adapt only when they perceive change to be taking place. This study aims to analyse how African indigenous vegetable (AIV) farmers perceive climate change in three different agro-climatic zones (ACZs) in Kenya, identify the main differences in historical seasonal and annual rainfall and temperature trends between the zones, discuss differences in farmers’ perceptions and historical trends and analyse the impact of these perceived changes and trends on yields, weeds, pests and disease infestation of AIVs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was undertaken in focus group discussions (FGD) (N = 211) and during interviews with individual farmers (N = 269). The Mann–Kendall test and regression were applied for trend analysis of time series data (1980-2014). Analysis of variance and least significant difference were used to test for differences in mean rainfall data, while a chi-square test examined the association between farmer perceptions and ACZs. Coefficient of variation expressed as a percentage was used to show variability in mean annual and seasonal rainfall between the zones.

Findings

Farmers perceived that higher temperatures, decreased rainfall, late onset and early retreat of rain, erratic rainfall patterns and frequent dry spells were increasing the incidences of droughts and floods. The chi-square results showed a significant relationship between some of these perceptions and ACZs. Meteorological data provided some evidence to support farmers’ perceptions of changing rainfall. No trend was detected in mean annual rainfall, but a significant increase was recorded in the semi-humid zone. A decreasing maximum temperature was noted in the semi-humid zone, but otherwise, an overall increase was detected. There were highly significant differences in mean annual rainfall between the zones. Farmers perceived reduced yields and changes in pest infestation and diseases in some AIVs to be prevalent in the dry season. This study’s findings provide a basis for local and timely institutional changes, which could certainly help in reducing the adverse effects of climate change.

Originality/value

This is an original research paper and the historical trends, farmers’ perceptions and effects of climate change on AIV production documented in this paper may also be representative of other ACZs in Kenya.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article

Felicitas C. Ratanya

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of electronic theses and dissertations (ETD) as important and unique collections that facilitate open access.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of electronic theses and dissertations (ETD) as important and unique collections that facilitate open access.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a brief introduction of the importance of ETD as materials for open access. This is with emphasis on the Kenya Information Preservation Society (KIPS) project which has, since 1993, been digitizing theses from a number of participating institutions across the country. This paper relies heavily on literature derived from existing documentation, online searches and website exploration, and the KIPS's union list of theses and dissertations CD‐ROM. A number of contracted employees (scanning and input) were also interviewed in order to provide statistics about the contributing institutions. Findings – The paper finds that the necessity of showcasing the intellectual research of higher education institutions within Kenya is reason enough to justify making the move towards creating electronic thesis services. The benefits making ETD available outweighs that of print‐only thesis provision due to the potential for enormous dissemination and open access. Research limitations/implications –ETD is a renowned research area for consideration. Librarians should be engaged in digitization of electronic collections that will provide desirable services to end users. Such approaches boost the knowledge economy of any country.

Practical implications

Evidence cited from the strengths of KIPS indicates that its major objective was to compile a national comprehensive database of research on Kenya, and by Kenyans. From available statistics, theses undertaken at postgraduate university levels meet the needs of Kenyan scholars. Originality/value – This paper attempts to give insights for emulating the ETD initiative by KIPS as a way to showcase the unique materials of open access, thereby making them relevant for the modern day library.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 27 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article

Josephine Cherotich, Oscar Ingasia Ayuya and Kenneth W. Sibiko

Financial knowledge (FK) is considered one of the major factors influencing performance of farm enterprises. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of FK on…

Abstract

Purpose

Financial knowledge (FK) is considered one of the major factors influencing performance of farm enterprises. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of FK on performance of women farm enterprises. Performance is measured using levels of savings and enterprise margins.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses primary data of 384 farmers from three sub-counties in Kericho County, Kenya. It employs a propensity score matching (PSM) approach to control for possible selection bias and to model the impact of FK on performance of women farm enterprises.

Findings

The analysis reveals that high FK has a significant positive impact on performance of women farm enterprises. Specifically, respondents with higher levels of FK were also associated with higher amounts of savings and enterprise margins.

Research limitations/implications

Econometrically, robust strategies were employed using PSM to ensure minimal estimation bias. Although PSM captures selection bias due to observable characteristics, it fails to capture selection bias due to unobservable factors.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the growing debate on the role played by FK on performance of small and micro enterprises. It provides insights on the state of FK among women farmers and identifies knowledge gaps and policy implications from a developing country perspective.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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Article

Josephine Cherotich, Kenneth Waluse Sibiko and Oscar Ingasia Ayuya

Inadequate finance is considered a major factor limiting the growth of small-scale women-owned farm enterprises in Sub-Saharan Africa. Women empowerment programs such as…

Abstract

Purpose

Inadequate finance is considered a major factor limiting the growth of small-scale women-owned farm enterprises in Sub-Saharan Africa. Women empowerment programs such as table banking (TB) and women enterprise fund were initiated in an attempt to curb the credit gap affecting women in agribusiness. This paper determines the factors influencing the extent of credit access among women farm-entrepreneurs who are either members or nonmembers of TB groups in Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in Kericho County using a sample of 384 respondents. Factor analysis was used to generate three indicators of entrepreneurial orientation which were included as explanatory variables in the regressions. Double hurdle econometric model was employed to analyze the factors influencing the decisions on credit uptake and amount of borrowed loan. Separate models were estimated for members and nonmembers of TB groups since they differed in volume and source of loan accessed.

Findings

Results reveal that age of the woman and innovativeness negatively influenced credit access, whereas education level, participation in off-farm activities, number of farm enterprises, perception on interest rate, extension contacts and financial knowledge positively influenced the decision to access credit. On the other hand, participation in off-farm activities, risk-taking behavior, total land size, extension access and financial knowledge were statistically significant with positive correlation on the amount of loan borrowed. Significant factors differ between members and nonmembers of TB groups implying divergence in underlying credit access challenges once one has joined such groups.

Research limitations/implications

The study did not consider supply-side factors affecting the amount of loan accessed by women farm-entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is one of the pioneer studies using the double hurdle model to analyze factors influencing the extent of credit access specifically among women farm-entrepreneurs and carrying out the analysis by membership in TB groups.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Article

Ezra Ondari‐Okemwa

Examines the training needs of practising professional librarians in the Kenyan public university libraries. There is a general, but false assumption, in this sector that…

Abstract

Examines the training needs of practising professional librarians in the Kenyan public university libraries. There is a general, but false assumption, in this sector that professional librarians who have attained the minimum professional qualifications need no further training on the job. Many changes have taken place and many more are likely to occur, which are likely to affect the working environment of librarians. Librarians must be trained in preparation for managing such changes. Suggestions for sources of funding are given. The specific training needs of practising librarians are described.

Details

Library Management, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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