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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Efthalia Dimara and Dimitris Skuras

The purpose of this work is to examine the range of information consumers seek on labels of quality products and construct an indicative check‐list of various types of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this work is to examine the range of information consumers seek on labels of quality products and construct an indicative check‐list of various types of informational labeling as well as to examine whether quality of information demanded segregates the market‐creating segments to be targeted by firms.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive interdisciplinary literature review based on findings in marketing, economics, geography and sociology reveals the often neglected range of factors forcing consumers to place importance on regionally denominated food and drink. The European Union (EU) has responded to growing consumer trends towards regional and traditional food and established special schemes regulating the production of such food and drink. A survey of 640 consumers of quality wine carried out within the framework of an EU‐funded program provides the empirical material of this work.

Findings

The study records the range of informational labeling sought by consumers as well as critical factors influencing their consuming behavior. Informational labeling linking product to place ranks top among a wide set of information sought on labels. A Poisson count data model reveals that consumers’ willingness to acquire information from labels is influenced by various socio‐economic characteristics and, in general, high demand for information is associated with higher expenditures for wine.

Originality/value

Informational labeling is a significant step for place revalorization and cultural relocalization and provides significant prospects to enterprises marketing local culture. Research should be extended to the examination of other products and the comparative assessment of the findings.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Dimitris Skuras, Efthalia Dimara and Sophia Stathopoulou

Assesses the job creation effects of capital subsidies provided to small and medium enterprises in rural and lagging areas. The proposed methodology takes account of…

Abstract

Assesses the job creation effects of capital subsidies provided to small and medium enterprises in rural and lagging areas. The proposed methodology takes account of extensive censoring of job creation among assisted rural firms, endogeneity of the capital stock change resultant from capital subsidies, and the extensive part‐time and seasonal job requirements in rural areas. Capital stock change, as a result of grant aid is negatively related to the decision to create new jobs and to the extent of job creation given that some employment is created. Evidence of this work provides the ground for discussing the effectiveness and implications of using capital subsidies as a job creation instrument within rural development policies.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Dimitris Tzelepis, Kostas Tsekouras, Dimitris Skuras and Efthalia Dimara

This work sets out to explore the effects of ISO 9001 on productive efficiency of firms.

Abstract

Purpose

This work sets out to explore the effects of ISO 9001 on productive efficiency of firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 1,572 firms from three Greek manufacturing industries is used for empirical work. The firms are from the food and beverages industries, the machineries industries as well as from the electrical and electronics appliances manufacturing industries and include both adopters and non‐adopters of ISO 9001. A stochastic frontier methodological approach is adopted and the effects of ISO 9001 can be modeled in four ways: as a managerial input alongside the conventional inputs of capital and labor, as a factor affecting technical inefficiency, as an input and a factor affecting technical inefficiency and as having no effect at all.

Findings

ISO 9001 operates as a factor affecting technical inefficiency with non‐neutral effects on capital and labor. The combined effect of ISO 9001 with capital increases the level of technical inefficiency reflecting adjustment costs incurred when ISO 9001 is adopted. The combined effect of ISO 9001 with labor decreases the level of technical inefficiency reflecting the positive result of ISO 9001 on reducing x‐inefficiency.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis isolates the effects of ISO 9001 on capital and labor but specific case studies are necessary in order to reveal managerial best practices that confront negative and support positive effects of ISO 9001 adoption within firms.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that ISO 9001 is a managerial factor reducing productive inefficiency.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Efthalia Dimara, Anastasia Petrou and Dimitris Skuras

Farmers’ decision to adopt organic cultivation and create niche markets is their response to the changing notions of quality and the gradual abandonment of the…

Abstract

Farmers’ decision to adopt organic cultivation and create niche markets is their response to the changing notions of quality and the gradual abandonment of the productivist logic in agriculture. This decision is analyzed within a multi‐level social ecological context designed to account simultaneously for all facets/parts of the farmer's decision‐making process. Social ecology provides a contextual platform conceptualizing global‐regional‐local relationships within which niche markets for food products are created. Emphasis is placed on farmers’ perception of the “environment” within which they have to decide on their participation in a policy scheme. Elements of the macro (global), meso (national/regional) and micro (farm household) “environmental” levels, affect the farmer's decision to adopt organic cultivation. Accordingly, a decision‐making tree reflecting how farmers perceive that environment and form their decisions is constructed, and statistical models test the impact of factors in the global‐regional‐local levels on this decision‐making process.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Efthalia Dimara, Dimitris Skuras, Kostas Tsekouras and Stavros Goutsos

The ISO 9000 scheme has been reproved for being a paper driven process with little if no impact on firm performance. As international scientific literature indicates a…

Abstract

The ISO 9000 scheme has been reproved for being a paper driven process with little if no impact on firm performance. As international scientific literature indicates a wide range of factors leading to the adoption of the ISO 9000 schemes, the impact of this adoption should be viewed and examined in a framework of the firms’ strategic orientation. A sample of Greek businesses that adopted the ISO 9000 scheme in the early 1990s is classified into three categories of strategic orientation, namely cost leadership, market differentiation and focus strategy. If all the firms are pooled together, there is no significant difference in their financial performance indicators after a period of six years following the adoption of ISO 9000. However, if the firms are examined separately and according to their strategic orientation, those firms pursuing a cost leadership strategy present statistically significant growth of financial profitability indicators, while those firms pursuing a market differentiation strategy present statistically significant growth of their turnover and market share. Thus, strategic orientation is a moderating factor influencing the relationship between registration to a quality scheme such as the ISO 9000 scheme, and the firm's financial performance.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Efthalia Dimara and Dimitris Skuras

Certification, geographic association and traceability of food and drink products are quality cues that have not been extensively researched by the current academic…

Abstract

Certification, geographic association and traceability of food and drink products are quality cues that have not been extensively researched by the current academic literature. These quality cues are highly valued by consumers possessing certain socio‐economic and demographic characteristics that form distinct and clearly‐defined market segments. A sample of 744 Greek wine consumers is used to assess the factors influencing consumer evaluations towards quality cues. An ordered probit model with sample selectivity reveals that these attributes are valued as highly important by consumers possessing certain socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. The type and source of information received by consumers, their place of origin, income, age, sex, education and marital status all exert an independent effect on the evaluation process. The use of such quality cues may be potentially useful in creating niche markets and advancing rural localities through the support of small producers utilizing local raw materials and production techniques.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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