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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Murali Sambasivan, T.J. Deepak, Ali Nasoor Salim and Venishri Ponniah

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to develop theoretical underpinnings using TCE, and second, to run the analysis using an advanced tool such as structural…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to develop theoretical underpinnings using TCE, and second, to run the analysis using an advanced tool such as structural equation modeling (SEM).

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted in the construction industry in Tanzania. A questionnaire-based survey method was used. A total of 308 respondents participated in the study. The relationships between the cause and effect factors were analyzed using SEM.

Findings

The important findings are as follows:cost overrun can be explained by consultant-related and material-related factors; disputes can be explained by cost overrun; arbitration can be explained by consultant-related, cost overrun, and dispute factors; litigation can be explained by client-related, disputes, and arbitration factors; and abandonment can be explained by consultant-related, external-related, disputes, arbitration, and litigation factors.

Originality/value

The main contributions of this study are theoretical development and comprehensive analyses of “cause” and “effect” factors of delays in the construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Charles Teye Amoatey, Yaa Asabea Ameyaw, Ebenezer Adaku and Samuel Famiyeh

– The purpose of this paper is to assess the causes and effects of delays in public sector housing projects in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the causes and effects of delays in public sector housing projects in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A purposive sampling approach was used in selecting the respondents for the study. These were experts working on various state housing construction projects in Ghana.

Findings

Results from the study showed that the critical factors that contribute to project delays in Ghana are; delay in payment to contractor/supplier, inflation/price fluctuation, price increases in materials, inadequate funds from sponsors/clients, variation orders and poor financial/capital market. The critical effects of delays are cost overrun, time overrun, litigation, lack of continuity by client and arbitration.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to causes and effects of project delays in Ghana based on data collected from only one state institution. Due to geographic constraints the researchers were unable to sample state institutions across Ghana involved in various housing projects.

Practical implications

This paper has documented the critical state housing construction project delay factors in Ghana. The results will help project managers and policymakers appreciate the effects of these delays on project outcomes.

Social implications

Measures aimed at reducing cost of housing projects in Ghana can translate into significant benefits to the poor and support achievement of government objective of providing affordable housing to low income citizens.

Originality/value

This research focussed on the key factors and best practices that lead to the success of state housing projects within the Ghanaian context.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Suhaiza Zailani, Hazrina Aziz Md. Ariffin, Mohammad Iranmanesh, Soroush Moeinzadeh and Masoomeh Iranmanesh

This paper aims to explore the relationship between delay factors and construction project performance with respect to project risk mitigation strategies as moderators.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationship between delay factors and construction project performance with respect to project risk mitigation strategies as moderators.

Design/methodology/approach

Random sampling was used to select the sample of the study. Data were gathered through a survey of 204 Malaysian construction companies. The data were analysed using the partial least squares technique.

Findings

The results indicate that environmental, resource and coordination issues negatively affect construction project performance. Project visibility and flexibility can mitigate the negative effects of both resource and coordination issues on project performance. Furthermore, supplier development can mitigate the negative effects of coordination issues.

Practical implications

The findings of the study will be useful for construction firms to complete construction projects timely, within a scheduled budget and with only minor defects if adopted.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to empirically test the moderating role of risk mitigation strategies on the relationship between delay factors and project performance in the construction industry.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Murat Guven, Eyup Calik, Basak Cetinguc, Bulent Guloglu and Fethi Calisir

This study aims to investigate the effects of flight delays, distance, number of passengers and seasonality on revenue in the Turkish air transport industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of flight delays, distance, number of passengers and seasonality on revenue in the Turkish air transport industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The domestic return routes of a Turkish airline company were examined to address this issue. Among five cities and six airports, 14 major domestic return routes were selected. The augmented mean group (AMG) estimator and common correlated effects mean group (CCEMG) estimator were conducted with a two-way fixed effects (FE) robustness test in this study.

Findings

The results show that arrival flight delay and departure flight delay had negative effects on revenue, whereas the distance between airports, the number of air passengers and seasonality had positive effects on revenue.

Research limitations/implications

The data used in this study were retrieved from a Turkish airline company; for future research, other airline companies operating in Turkey may be included.

Practical implications

These findings could be evaluated by air transportation leaders to provide a guide to make strategic decisions to achieve greater performance in this competitive environment.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper comes from the facts that besides distance and number of passengers, the authors control for the seasonality when assessing the effects of flight delay on revenue; they use panel data techniques, which permit them to control for individual heterogeneity, and create more variability, more efficiency and less collinearity among the variables; they use two recent panel data techniques, CCEMG and AMG, allowing for cross-section dependence.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 48 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Steffi De Jans, Liselot Hudders and Veroline Cauberghe

This paper aims to examine the immediate and delayed effects of advertising literacy training on children’s cognitive advertising literacy for an embedded advertising…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the immediate and delayed effects of advertising literacy training on children’s cognitive advertising literacy for an embedded advertising format, product placement and, subsequently, its persuasive effects. In addition, this study explored whether this effect is moderated by children’s general advertising liking. The study also investigated whether the effects of training were dependent on children’s ages.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study is conducted using a three (training session: control condition vs advertising literacy training with immediate ad exposure vs advertising literacy training with ad exposure after one week) by two (age: 7-8 years vs 10-11 years) between-subjects experimental design.

Findings

The results of the experimental study showed that advertising literacy training increases children’s cognitive advertising literacy for product placement for both younger and older children and both immediately and delayed (measured after one week). In addition, cognitive advertising literacy had an influence on the effectiveness of product placement (i.e. purchase request) when children’s general ad liking was low, though not when it was high. No moderating effects of age were found.

Practical implications

This study shows that advertising literacy training sessions can improve children’s cognitive advertising literacy for non-traditional, embedded advertising formats.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine and confirm the immediate and delayed effects of advertising literacy training sessions on children’s cognitive advertising literacy for non-traditional advertising formats.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Seth Ketron and Kelly Naletelich

Service delays are of significant concern to both consumers and companies – delays cost both groups billions of dollars and lead to consumer frustration and switching…

Abstract

Purpose

Service delays are of significant concern to both consumers and companies – delays cost both groups billions of dollars and lead to consumer frustration and switching activity. Therefore, determining means of overcoming negative consumer reactions to delays is important, and the authors propose that anthropomorphic facial expressions could be one of those means. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to test the effects of anthropomorphic cues (namely, happy and sad faces) on consumer responses to service delays, depending on whether service providers are at fault for those delays.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experimental studies test the proposed effects.

Findings

Happy faces alongside messages about delays appear to provide no significant benefit to repatronage intentions compared to a non-anthropomorphic (control) condition, whether the service provider is or is not to blame. Meanwhile, sad faces are harmful when the provider is not to blame but can somewhat bolster repatronage intentions when the provider is at fault. Further, perceived sincerity of the facial expression and patience with the provider mediate these effects.

Research limitations/implications

The findings offer important insights into how anthropomorphic cues, including emojis, can influence consumer responses to service delays. The work, thus, offers clarity around instances in which anthropomorphism might lead to negative consumer responses.

Practical implications

Managers can use the findings to increase patience and mitigate potentially negative consumer responses when service delays occur.

Originality/value

This work adds clarity to the literature on anthropomorphism by showing how blame attributions for service delays can lead to different consumer responses to anthropomorphic cues. The findings also show how anthropomorphism can help to mitigate negative consumer responses to service delays.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Tapio Niemi, Ari-Pekka Hameri, Petro Kolesnyk and Patrik Appelqvist

Delivery punctuality is essential in supply chain management, yet the cost of untimely delivery is usually assumed to be given or based on intuition and not quantified by facts.

Abstract

Purpose

Delivery punctuality is essential in supply chain management, yet the cost of untimely delivery is usually assumed to be given or based on intuition and not quantified by facts.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a data set containing detailed transaction data for a nine-year period on orders and deliveries of sport goods. The methodology is based on applying a polynomial distributed lag model to longitudinal data on supply chain transactions.

Findings

The results indicate that small delivery delays up to two weeks decrease the sales by maximum 10% during a period of 3–4 weeks. Longer delays, up to 45 days, have a larger negative effect on sales, which can also last longer. For this case company, the estimated lost sales due to late deliveries (=5 days) were 5.1% of the delivery value. The longer delays got, the large the cost was: delays at least 45 days long were the most costly causing almost 40% of the estimated lost sales.

Practical implications

This study offers a methodology for quantifying lost sales due to delivery delays and estimating how long the poor delivery performance affects retailers' order behaviour.

Originality/value

The results give a quantitative decision-making tool for supply chain managers to estimate the profitability of investments in the supply chain performance, especially on improving punctuality.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Mike Gerdes, Dieter Scholz and Diego Galar

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of condition-based maintenance based on unscheduled maintenance delays that were caused by ATA chapter 21 (air…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of condition-based maintenance based on unscheduled maintenance delays that were caused by ATA chapter 21 (air conditioning). The goal is to show the introduction of condition monitoring in aircraft systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was done using the Airbus In-Service database to analyze the delay causes, delay length and to check if they are easy to detect via condition monitoring or not. These results were then combined with delay costs.

Findings

Analysis shows that about 80 percent of the maintenance actions that cause departure delays can be prevented when additional sensors are introduced. With already existing sensors it is possible to avoid about 20 percent of the delay causing maintenance actions.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited on the data of the Airbus in-service database and on ATA chapter 21 (air conditioning).

Practical implications

The research shows that delays can be prevented by using existing sensors in the air conditioning system for condition monitoring. More delays can be prevented by installing new sensors.

Originality/value

The research focuses on the effect of the air conditioning system of an aircraft on the delay effects and the impact of condition monitoring on delays.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Namin Kim and Francis M. Ulgado

The present study compares two types of compensation – i.e. on‐the‐spot and delayed – and tries to reveal how and when firms can utilize delayed compensation effectively…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study compares two types of compensation – i.e. on‐the‐spot and delayed – and tries to reveal how and when firms can utilize delayed compensation effectively. For this, failure severity is considered how these two types of compensation affect satisfaction and repurchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A scenario‐based experiment in the hotel and restaurant industries was used with a sample of 292 students.

Findings

The results show that failure severity acts as a moderating variable in a recovery process of compensation‐satisfaction‐repurchase intention. The more severe consumers perceive the failure is, the more they depend on satisfaction to decide repurchase intentions. The two types of compensation are also moderated by failure severity on their effects on satisfaction and repurchase intentions. On‐the‐spot compensation leads to more satisfaction and repatronage intentions when failures are severe, but the results are not as straightforward when failures are insignificant. Under such a condition, while delayed compensation does not engender customer satisfaction with recovery as much as on‐the‐spot compensation, repatronage intentions for both types of compensation were similar in the hotel industry and even higher in restaurant services.

Research limitations/implications

Industry differences such as ease of visit, frequency of visit, competition factors, and primary value (e.g. hedonic versus utilitarian) are expected to influence the effects of on‐the‐spot versus delayed compensation.

Practical implications

The study provides practitioners with the implication that the timing of compensation should be approached strategically according to the severity of failure and recovery outcomes they expect to achieve.

Originality/value

The present study tries to focus on compensation, one of the most commonly used recovery strategies, and tries to find the effects of different timings of it.

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Henk Akkermans and Chris Voss

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how the bullwhip effect, as found in product supply chains, might also manifest itself in services, as well as what…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how the bullwhip effect, as found in product supply chains, might also manifest itself in services, as well as what policies can be successful for mitigating it.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of analytic methods was used – inductive case analysis and analysis of data from two service supply chains in the telecom industry.

Findings

Empirical evidence from two cases was examined and provides support for the presence of a service bullwhip effect. Quantitative and qualitative case data were used to explore how this effect manifests itself in services, the distinctive drivers of the bullwhip effect in services, and the managerial actions that can either trigger or mitigate these bullwhip effects. In total, eight propositions are developed and three types of characteristics that potentially make the bullwhip effect worse in services than in manufacturing are identified: the destabilizing effects of manual rework in otherwise automated service processes; the omission of accurate and timely data on rework volumes upstream in the chain, pointing at future bullwhip effects downstream; and the lack of a supply‐chain mindset within the various departments jointly responsible for delivering the service, leading to longer delays in reacting to service bullwhips as they develop over time.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on two cases within a single industry, limiting generalizability. The propositions developed need testing in a wider set of contexts, including hybrid service and product supply chains.

Practical implications

The implications of this research can help organizations prevent or reduce the negative impact of planned and unplanned fluctuations in their service supply chains.

Originality/value

This paper explores an area that has been well researched in manufacturing, but not in services, and it contributes to both the theory and practice of service supply chains.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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