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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2021

Yongqiang Sun, Yiwen Zhang and Xiao-Liang Shen

Prior studies fail to reach a consensus on the effects of extrinsic motivation (EM) on knowledge contribution in virtual communities. To fill this research gap, this…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior studies fail to reach a consensus on the effects of extrinsic motivation (EM) on knowledge contribution in virtual communities. To fill this research gap, this research proposes two mechanisms of EM – direct effect versus indirect effect via intrinsic motivation (IM) – and introduces prosocial motivation (PSM) as the moderator to define the valence of these two mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopts structural equation modeling to validate hypotheses based on 448 responses from XiaoMi online community users.

Findings

The results of the moderated mediation analysis show that the direct effect, indirect effect via IM and total effect of EM on knowledge contribution are contingent on the level of PSM. Specifically, as the level of PSM increases, the direct, indirect and total effects of EM on knowledge contribution and the effects of EM on IM change from positive to insignificant and then to negative. Although IM constantly plays an important role across levels of PSM, its effect is stronger when the degree of PSM is high.

Originality/value

This paper advances knowledge of an integrated framework of EM by simultaneously describing its direct and indirect effects, describing its positive and negative effects and untangling the boundary conditions under which each effect of EM applies.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2021

Jan Klostermann, Chris Hydock and Reinhold Decker

In recent years, brands have increasingly engaged in corporate political advocacy (CPA; also termed brand activism or corporate sociopolitical activity) by taking…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, brands have increasingly engaged in corporate political advocacy (CPA; also termed brand activism or corporate sociopolitical activity) by taking positions on polarizing sociopolitical issues. Recent experimental research suggests that consumers respond to CPA based on its alignment with their own values, and that it typically induces an overall negative response. This study aims to provide additional insights by exploring consumer brand perceptions following CPA.

Design/methodology/approach

An event study of 106 CPA events and weekly consumer brand perception data was conducted. A regression model was used to investigate the moderating effects of CPA effort, concurrence and the strength of the online protests evoked by the CPA.

Findings

The results show that CPA had a negative effect on consumers’ brand perceptions and that the effect was stronger for customers relative to non-customers. The negative effect was attenuated by CPA concurrence and amplified by effort. Additionally, online protests were driven by the CPA effort and had a strong negative effect on brand perception. Online protests were stronger in the past, and, in turn, the negative effects of CPA on brand perceptions have slightly weakened in recent years.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing literature by highlighting the role of online protests following CPA and distinguishing consumer and customer responses. This study also provides converging evidence of the moderating effects of effort and concurrence identified in previous studies.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2021

Noel Yee Man Siu, Tracy Junfeng Zhang and Ho Yan Kwan

By extending the expectancy-disconfirmation theory and integrating the elaboration likelihood model, this study aims to explore the reference effects (i.e. disconfirmation…

Abstract

Purpose

By extending the expectancy-disconfirmation theory and integrating the elaboration likelihood model, this study aims to explore the reference effects (i.e. disconfirmation and self-identity) and customer engagement that affect customer experience on satisfaction with a museum visit. The study is designed to test a dual-mediator mechanism involving disconfirmation and self-identity. The moderating role of cognitive, affective or behavioral engagements is also examined with the overall purpose to advance the understanding of customer experience in cultural consumption such as museum visits.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered field survey in two stages was carried out on visitors to the Hong Kong Museum of Art. A total of 465 valid response sets were used for analysis. Hypotheses were tested using confirmatory factor analysis, three-step mediation test, structural equation modeling and moderation regressions.

Findings

Disconfirmation and self-identity are found to be dual mediators in the experience–satisfaction relationship. Cognitive engagement reduces the effect of knowledge experience on disconfirmation and self-identity but increases that of the entertainment experience on disconfirmation and self-identity. Affective engagement amplifies the effect of knowledge experience on self-identity but mitigates the importance of entertainment evaluations.

Practical implications

Findings highlight the importance of both perceived knowledge and entertainment experiences in visitors’ evaluation of a cultural experience. Managers are suggested to craft promotional messages with the psychological appeal that connects visitors with museum services. Appropriate engagement tactics for museums can be developed to avoid overloading visitors with information.

Originality/value

Previous studies treat disconfirmation as the dominant reference effect in the formation of customer satisfaction. This study shows both disconfirmation and self-identity as dual reference effects that link the customer experience to satisfaction in the museum context, serving as a pioneer in defining how the influence of experience on reference effects varies depending on how customers are cognitively and affectively engaged in such context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 November 2021

Relinde De Koeijer, Jaap Paauwe, Robbert Huijsman and Mathilde Strating

This study aims to examine the effect of human resource management (HRM) in mitigating negative effects of Lean management and Six Sigma (LM&SS) on employee well-being in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of human resource management (HRM) in mitigating negative effects of Lean management and Six Sigma (LM&SS) on employee well-being in health care. The authors subdivide well-being into three components: happiness, trust and health.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional, multisite survey study in internal service units of hospitals. Data analyzed using multivariate regression come from a sample of 1,886 survey respondents (42 units, N = 218 supervisors, N = 1,668 employees) in eight Dutch academic hospitals that have implemented LM&SS.

Findings

The present study findings show no or weak effects of LM&SS on the happiness and health component of employee well-being. In addition, the authors found a significant but weak direct positive effect (ß = 0.07) of the LM&SS bundle on the trusting relationships component of well-being. Therefore, moderating effects of HRM practices on the relationship between LM&SS and employee well-being seem less relevant because an existing relationship between LM&SS and employee well-being is a prerequisite for moderation (Hayes, 2009). There were unexpected side effects. Inspired by research that discusses direct effects of HRM on employee well-being, the authors tested this relationship and found that HRM has a direct positive effect on trust and happiness of employees in health care. For the health component of well-being, the present results show a weak negative effect of HRM.

Practical implications

This study results in a cautiously optimistic view about LM&SS in health care, provided that it is applied in a targeted manner (to improve the performance of their processes) and that HRM is strategically aligned with the goals of LM&SS to improve employees’ happiness and trusting relationships.

Originality/value

Unique features of the study are the focus on the consequences for employees’ well-being related to LM&SS in health care, the role of HRM in regard to this relationship and the participation of all eight Dutch academic hospitals in this research.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Songmee Kim, Seyoon Jang, Woojin Choi, Chorong Youn and Yuri Lee

“Contactless service” refers to the use of technology in providing products or services without a salesperson. This study explores the mechanism underlying Millennial and…

Abstract

Purpose

“Contactless service” refers to the use of technology in providing products or services without a salesperson. This study explores the mechanism underlying Millennial and Generation Z (M/Z generations) consumers' preference for contactless service over salespersons in retail stores. In addition, this study tests differences between the M/Z generations.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers predict characteristics to be antecedents of young consumer's preference for contactless service over salespersons and that the effects are mediated by technology self-efficacy. Next, a moderating variable (perceived consumer conformity) is added in the path between technology self-efficacy and the preference for contactless service. The hypotheses are tested among 142 Gen Z and 137 Millennial respondents.

Findings

The results show that M/Z generations’ characteristics significantly influence the preference for contactless service, except for security seeking. Also, interests in new technology and safety seeking are perceived higher by M/Z generations. The influence of technology self-efficacy on the preference for contactless service is moderated by social conformity.

Originality/value

As retail technology rapidly develops, the service industry is expected to change from the past, where salespersons played an important role, to contactless services. This study has academic and practical values, for the authors clarify the underlying psychological mechanisms of why young consumers prefer retail technology rather than communication with salespersons.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Anne Moes, Marieke Fransen, Bob Fennis, Tibert Verhagen and Harry van Vliet

Physical stores are increasingly dependent on impulse visits and the impulse purchases of passers-by. Interactive advertising screens in store windows could help retailers…

Abstract

Purpose

Physical stores are increasingly dependent on impulse visits and the impulse purchases of passers-by. Interactive advertising screens in store windows could help retailers increase impulse-visit urges and impulse-buying urges. However, the effects of interactive screens in physical surroundings have not been studied before. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effect of interactive screens on impulse urges and gain insight into the underlying mechanism that explains the possible effect.

Design/methodology/approach

An interactive screen was placed in a store window. Using three field experiments, we studied the effect of interactivity-level (high vs low) on the impulse-visit and impulse-buying urges of passers-by, and the mediating role of self-agency in these effects.

Findings

Highly interactive (compared to less interactive) advertising screens in store windows positively affect impulse-visit and impulse-buying urges through self-agency. Retailers can therefore use interactive advertising screens to increase the number of impulse purchases if feelings of self-agency are activated.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the extent to which interactive screens in a store window enhance the impulse-visit and impulse-buying urges of passers-by and the mediating factor of these effects. By conducting three field experiments, we achieved a high external validity and managed to share very reliable results owing to the replication of the findings.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Derrick Anquanah Cudjoe, He Yumei and Hanhui Hu

This study examines the impact of China’s trade, aid and foreign direct investment (FDI) on the economic growth of Africa.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the impact of China’s trade, aid and foreign direct investment (FDI) on the economic growth of Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Our study covered 41 countries in Africa, cutting across the western, eastern, central, southern and northern sub-regions. The study adopted the dynamic system generalized method of moments (SGMM), feasible generalized least squares (FGLS) and Dumitrescu–Hurlin Panel Granger causality techniques for estimations.

Findings

Overall, FDI, trade and aid from China have a nonlinear relationship with Africa’s economic growth. The findings reveal a key novelty in that the marginal effect on real per capita GDP increases when China’s FDI interacts with the manufacturing sector in Africa. These findings are robust to long-run estimations.

Research limitations/implications

Given that we have examined the short-and long-run symbiotic effects of China’s FDI and Africa’s manufacturing sector and China’s aid and Africa’s manufacturing sector, more studies are warranted in this area, particularly to produce further empirical evidence of these findings. Moreover, future work could focus on investigating the country-specific effects of China’s trade, China’s FDI and China’s aid on real GDP per capita in each African country as our results reflect within-country elasticities.

Originality/value

This study provides new evidence on the impact of China’s trade, aid and FDI on the growth of African economies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to empirically explore the long-run effects of China’s trade, FDI and aid on economic growth in African countries. This study also tests the claim of the displacement of Africa’s manufacturing industry by its Chinese counterparts.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2021

Anupama Prashar

The past sustainability literature on the effects of nonfinancial disclosures on a firm's performance is highly fragmented. Thus, the authors raise the following research…

Abstract

Purpose

The past sustainability literature on the effects of nonfinancial disclosures on a firm's performance is highly fragmented. Thus, the authors raise the following research questions to test potential differences: Is sustainability reporting (SR) based on the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) or other systematic reporting framework associated with firm performance? Does quality or level of SR impact firm performance? Do firm-, industry- and country-level factors moderate the effect of SR on firm performance? Does the presence of publication bias affect this relationship?

Design/methodology/approach

Meta-analysis technique suggested by Hedges & Olkin (1985) was used to analyze a sample of 98 effect sizes reported in 60 studies published between 2010 and 2020 studying SR–performance associations. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses were used to investigate the moderating variables accounting for this heterogeneity in the relationship.

Findings

Results reveal that level and quality of SR influence the market-, accounting- and operational-based measures of firm performance. Meta-regression results depict that for large, matured firms, or the ones with institutional investors as board members or the ones that actively participate SR quality awards, SR translates better into firm performance. Subgroup analyses demonstrate that the SR–firm performance relationship is moderated by the corporate governance (CG) system of the country and the firm's affiliation to environmentally sensitive industries.

Originality/value

These findings extend theoretical and practical understanding on effects of corporate sustainability communications on performance.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2021

Yifan Tang, Yiting Kuang, Han Li, Binbin Cao and Ping Qing

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of food retailer's Approaching the Expiration Date (AED) labelling on consumers' retailer-related response…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of food retailer's Approaching the Expiration Date (AED) labelling on consumers' retailer-related response. Specifically, the main effect of food retailer's AED labelling on consumers' patronage intention, the mediation effect of food retailer's concern for consumers and the boundary condition of this effect are explored. The selected context of research is that food retailers are reluctant to stick an AED label on nearly expired food due to negative effect on selling them.

Design/methodology/approach

Two separate pretests and two separate experiments have been conducted to investigate the influence of food retailer's AED labelling on patronage intention. Pretest 1 develops the stimulus material of food retailer's AED labelling. Study 1 investigates the influence of AED labelling on patronage intention and mediation effect of consumers' perception of retailer's concern for consumers. Pretest 2 develops the stimulus material of government regulation on food retailer's AED labelling. Study 2 explores the boundary condition of the positive effect, namely the moderation effect of whether retailer's AED labelling is voluntary or mandatory.

Findings

The main findings of this research highlight the positive influence of food retailer's AED labelling on consumers' patronage intention. In addition, the current research reveals the underlying mechanism food retailer's concern for consumers and the boundary condition whether the AED labelling is voluntary or mandatory.

Originality/value

Although previous researches has explored the effect of food retailer's AED labelling on consumers' response, most of them focus on consumer purchase intention of the nearly expired food and neglect its effect on consumers' food retailer-related response. It is a need for food retailer to explore the potential positive influence of food retailer's AED labelling on consumers' patronage intention.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2021

Xiaoguo Xiong, Weihong Chen and Xi Zhong

While the effect of vertical pay dispersion on the voluntary turnover rate of vice presidents (VPs) has received attention, the existing research conclusions are still…

Abstract

Purpose

While the effect of vertical pay dispersion on the voluntary turnover rate of vice presidents (VPs) has received attention, the existing research conclusions are still divided. Therefore, this study aims to explore the relationship between vertical pay dispersion and voluntary turnover rate of VPs in a Chinese context using data from listed firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrating tournament theory and social comparison theory, this study examines the non-linear effect of vertical pay dispersion on VPs’ voluntary turnover rates using empirical data from Chinese A-share listed firms from 2007 to 2016.

Findings

The results reveal a U-shaped relationship between vertical pay dispersion and the voluntary turnover rate of VPs. After further incorporating the moderating effect of the board governance structure, the effect is found to be enhanced in firms with more efficient board governance (i.e. smaller board size, higher board turnover and higher proportion of outside directors). Further analysis indicates that the aforementioned conclusions mainly exist in non-state-owned enterprises rather than state-owned enterprises.

Originality/value

The findings deepen the understanding of the costs and benefits associated with vertical pay dispersion, enrich the research findings on pay dispersion and contribute to the integration of previously inconsistent findings.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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