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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Edwin van Teijlingen and Julie Bruce

Smokebusters is a community‐based smoking prevention initiative for young people which aims to prevent them from starting to smoke. Although the number of clubs throughout the UK…

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Abstract

Smokebusters is a community‐based smoking prevention initiative for young people which aims to prevent them from starting to smoke. Although the number of clubs throughout the UK and Europe has increased over the last decade, there is little evidence of the effectiveness of this initiative. The authors conducted a systematic review of published and unpublished health promotion evaluation reports in an attempt to assess the effectiveness of this intervention. This paper outlines the methodological and practical difficulties encountered when conducting a systematic review of a community‐based health promotion initiative.

Details

Health Education, vol. 99 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Mariam Vahdaninia, Bibha Simkhada, Edwin van Teijlingen, Hannah Blunt and Alan Mercel-Sanca

Mental health disparities exist among Black, Asian and Minority Ethnics (BAME) populations. This paper aims to provide an overview of mental health services designed for the BAME…

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Abstract

Purpose

Mental health disparities exist among Black, Asian and Minority Ethnics (BAME) populations. This paper aims to provide an overview of mental health services designed for the BAME population in the UK, both established BAME communities and refugee/asylum-seekers.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of electronic databases were searched for peer-reviewed studies conducted within the past decade in the UK. Using the Arksey and O’Malley methodology, data were extracted, analysed and summarised.

Findings

A total of 13 papers were identified, mostly non-randomised community-based. Studies were very heterogeneous in terms of their sample and service provided. After the initial appraisal, the authors presented a narrative synthesis. Overall, all studies reported positive mental health outcomes and beneficial effects.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the time limitations and quality of the papers, the authors only included peer-reviewed journal papers.

Practical implications

Mental health services provided for BAME people, both established and refugee/asylum-seekers are feasible and improve engagement with the services and mental health outcomes. Initiatives are required to facilitate the integration of these targeted services within mental health and community services for BAME in the UK.

Originality/value

This scoping review is a snapshot of the mental health services designed for BAME people in the UK, either established or refugee/asylum-seekers in the past 10 years and adds to the evidence-based knowledge from these studies.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Pratik Adhikary, Zoë A. Sheppard, Steven Keen and Edwin van Teijlingen

Although South Asia is a growing supplier of migrant labour, there is a paucity of research on the health and well-being of male Nepalese migrant workers. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Although South Asia is a growing supplier of migrant labour, there is a paucity of research on the health and well-being of male Nepalese migrant workers. The purpose of this paper is to assess the health and mental well-being of Nepalese construction and factory workers employed in Malaysia, Qatar and Saudi Arabia.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire administered, in and around Nepal’s international airport, to 403 migrants who had worked for over six months in their host countries. Logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with self-reported health status and mental health symptoms.

Findings

Over 13 per cent reported poor or very poor health and nearly a quarter reported mental health issues. Whilst age and exercise were significantly associated with health status, poor work environments and perceived health risks were associated with both mental health issues and health status.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to males only and those working in the factories and the construction industry. To improve migrant health and mental well-being, Nepalese and host governments should consider mandatory health insurance and a range of pre-departure and arrival education around general literacy, mental health assessments and workplace health and safety.

Originality/value

There have been no known studies on the health and well-being of Nepalese migrant construction and factory workers in the Middle East and Malaysia. The strong association between self-reported poor health and perceived work environment is an important issue that policy makers in Nepal and destination countries should address.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Margaret Reid, Helen Bush, Annie Anderson and Edwin van Teijlingen

This paper reports on the dissemination strategies of researchers in the MAFF food acceptability and choice programme, and contrasts these with the problems faced by practitioners…

237

Abstract

This paper reports on the dissemination strategies of researchers in the MAFF food acceptability and choice programme, and contrasts these with the problems faced by practitioners in gaining access to relevant health‐related research findings. The paper proposes solutions, one of which is to publish research findings in the form of short summaries, more easily accessible by practitioners.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Pramod Raj Regmi, Edwin van Teijlingen and Sanjeev Raj Neupane

It is widely believed that transgender individuals in Nepal inject silicone for face and body manipulation, a phenomenon thought to be common among transgender individuals…

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Abstract

Purpose

It is widely believed that transgender individuals in Nepal inject silicone for face and body manipulation, a phenomenon thought to be common among transgender individuals globally. Therefore, this qualitative study conducted in Nepal explored: (1) awareness of silicone use and sources of information; (2) reasons for using silicone; (3) notion of cost and quality of these procedures; (4) reported negative aspects, including side effects and (5) health seeking behaviors of Nepali transgender women.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out eight focus group discussions (FGDs) with transgender women at four different districts of Nepal, five in the capital Kathmandu and three in different rural areas. We also interviewed three transgender women who preferred not to participate in the FGD but were happy to be interviewed separately. Similarly, six interviews with stakeholders working for sexual and gender minority populations were also conducted.

Findings

Most FGD participants were young (mean age 23.06 ± 3.9 years) and the majority (55%; n = 34) completed grade six to high school level. Peer networks of transgender people and the Internet were the more popular sources of information about silicone. The decision to use silicone was largely influenced by the desire to look beautiful and more feminine. Often they appear not to follow the recommended procedures for silicone use. Their health seeking behavior regarding side effects or complications of these procedures was very poor.

Originality/value

Findings reflect that targeted interventions aimed at transgender individuals should educate them on the use of silicone, as well as explore safe and affordable approaches to meet gender-related appearance needs of Nepali transgender people.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Heather Hartwell, Edwin van Teijlingen and Jonathon Parker

The purpose of this paper is to review one aspect, impact of the forthcoming assessment of research in UK universities, the Research Excellence Framework (REF) and to examine its…

220

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review one aspect, impact of the forthcoming assessment of research in UK universities, the Research Excellence Framework (REF) and to examine its meaning and potential for enhanced partnerships between practitioners and academia.

Design/methodology/approach

This article debates the increasing requirement of practitioner and academic collaboration as well as outlining how we, as a contributing University, are grappling with the evidence needed to develop a framework that will demonstrate impact outside of formal academia.

Findings

It is difficult to establish the link between cause and effect and to assume that the potential changes in behaviour are the result of certain interventions; capturing learning or useful data which contributes to evidenced based policy is challenging. The problem is compounded by the diversity of funding sources, each with its own scrutinising requirements. The importance of REF for the integration of evidenced based practice is evident and demonstrates the major role that practitioners could play in the future.

Originality/value

A considerable amount of UK research is publically funded, hence fuelling the Government's drive to determine impact on society. This paper debates for the first time that practitioners have a role to play in its creation and identification.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Laura Wyness, Flora Douglas and Edwin van Teijlingen

This paper discusses the use of diary‐keeping as part of an evaluation of a complex, community‐based health promotion initiative, using the Mobile Information Bus (MIB) as an…

Abstract

This paper discusses the use of diary‐keeping as part of an evaluation of a complex, community‐based health promotion initiative, using the Mobile Information Bus (MIB) as an example. The MIB was designed to provide health and related information for living adolescents in rural areas of Northeast Scotland. The general strengths and limitations of diary‐keeping as a research method are discussed alongside an account of the evaluators' experiences of using this method within the MIB context, as well as suggestions for improving the efficacy of diary‐keeping as a research method. In addition, the results of an extensive literature search on the topic of diaries as a research method are reported. As part of the MIB evaluation, the diary provided a contemporaneous, in‐depth account of the intervention in operation. Those engaged in evaluation of similar types of projects (particularly related to process evaluation) may find the use of a project diary a useful adjunct to other research methods.

Details

Health Education, vol. 104 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Bibha Simkhada, Edwin R. van Teijlingen, Maureen Porter, Padam Simkhada and Sarada P. Wasti

– The purpose of this paper is to analyse cost as a barrier to the uptake of antenatal care (ANC) in rural Nepal amidst a variety of barriers and facilitators.

297

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse cost as a barrier to the uptake of antenatal care (ANC) in rural Nepal amidst a variety of barriers and facilitators.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study with face-to-face interviews were conducted with 50 ANC users and non-users participants. The setting is rural Nepal, some 20 kilometres outside the capital Kathmandu. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and translated into English and results were presented thematically.

Findings

Cost was sometimes a barrier to seeking ANC for poor rural women. It included transport costs, opportunity costs of not being able to work in the household and service-related costs (such as blood or urine tests). The effect of cost as a barrier varied between women of different socio-economic status. Cost was a barrier to accessing ANC partly due to the women's lack of control over household resources.

Social implications

It is important to consider cost in the wider socio-economic context of rural people's lives as financial costs alone do not explain the level of uptake of ANC.

Originality/value

This study provides an original insight of women's experiences on financial issues relating to the use of ANC services in Nepal. Another important aspect of this study was approached with the multiple respondents (i.e. women, their husbands and their mothers-in-law) regarding the use of ANC and financial impact in the use of services. The findings of this study have important implications in health policy formation by providing clear picture of women's financial situation in access to ANC.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Amudha Poobalan, Padam Simkhada and Edwin van Teijlingen

Traditionally the role of the external examiners in UK universities or more formally Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) is that of quality assurance (QA). Typically, an…

Abstract

Traditionally the role of the external examiners in UK universities or more formally Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) is that of quality assurance (QA). Typically, an experienced academic who is not affiliated with the HEI (i.e., someone from another university) is invited to act as an external examiner for a particular course or a module. The external examiner’s primary role is to provide impartial and independent advice to ensure academic standards are upheld for a degree program; and that the degree is comparable with similar programs across the country and that the achievements of students are also comparable with students on courses at other universities. This primary role makes external examiners highly valued people in UK universities, and as a result, their views are nearly always taken seriously. Over and above this recognized primary role of QA, external examiners can also be engaged by the host university in other ways. These additional roles or tasks of the external examiner can help enhance teaching and learning in higher education. This chapter will reflect on the range of roles, including the ones that go beyond QA.

Details

The Role of External Examining in Higher Education: Challenges and Best Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-174-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Ivy Lynn Bourgeault, Eugene Declercq, Jane Sandall, Sirpa Wrede, Meredith Vanstone, Edwin van Teijlingen, Raymond DeVries and Cecilia Benoit

Purpose – This chapter critically examines the purportedly growing phenomenon of Maternal Request Caesarean Sections (MRCS) and its relative contribution to the rising caesarean…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter critically examines the purportedly growing phenomenon of Maternal Request Caesarean Sections (MRCS) and its relative contribution to the rising caesarean section (CS) rates.

Methodology – We apply a decentred comparative methodological approach to this problem by drawing upon and comparatively examining empirical data from Canada, the US, the UK and Finland.

Findings – We find that the general argument that has emerged within the obstetric community, evidenced in particular by a recent “State of the Science” conference, is that the reduced risks and benefits of MRCS are evenly balanced, thus ethically it could be seen as a valid choice for women. This approach, taken in particular in the North American context, negates the problematic nature of accurately measuring, and therefore assessing the importance of maternal request in addressing rising CS rates. Moreover, although some of the blame for rising CS rates has focused on MRCS, we argue that it has a relatively minor influence on rising rates. We show instead how rising CS rates can more appropriately be attributed to obstetrical policies and practices.

Originality – In presenting this argument, we challenge some of the prevailing notions of consumerism in maternity care and its influence on the practice patterns of maternity care professionals.

Practical implications – Our argument also calls into question how successful efforts to address MRCS will be in reducing CS rates given its relatively minor influence.

Details

Patients, Consumers and Civil Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-215-9

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