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Article

Mary‐Ellen Boyle and Edward Ottensmeyer

Business leaders, in increasing numbers, are looking to the creative power of the arts in their efforts to manage strategic change, to enhance innovation, or to strengthen

Abstract

Purpose

Business leaders, in increasing numbers, are looking to the creative power of the arts in their efforts to manage strategic change, to enhance innovation, or to strengthen corporate cultures. In this case study, we focus attention on what is widely regarded as one of the world's most extensive corporate arts‐based learning initiatives, the Catalyst program at Unilever.

Design/methodology/approach

In a wide‐ranging interview with James Hill, now a group vice‐president and Catalyst's leading executive sponsor, this paper explores the origins, operations, and outcomes of this innovative program.

Findings

Finds that Catalyst came about as a result of savvy leadership and a corporate willingness to take risks in developing an “enterprise culture;” it now flourishes in three divisions due to ownership at multiple levels of the organization as well as its ability to stimulate new product development, attract and retain creative people, and boost the company's marketing efforts; and it persists because its starting points are always actual business problems, the solutions to which improve financial performance and shareholder returns.

Originality/value

To management scholars, this case provides an additional data point in the ongoing study of strategy implementation and organizational change. To corporate executives seeking fresh ideas, the Unilever/Catalyst story offers a novel and intuitively appealing approach to the vexing challenges of leading strategic change, told from the perspective of an experienced executive.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Book part

Rafael Cejudo and Pablo Rodríguez-Gutiérrez

The main purpose of this conceptual paper is drawing up a framework to assess the company responsibility regarding culture and fine arts. Since a rich cultural life…

Abstract

The main purpose of this conceptual paper is drawing up a framework to assess the company responsibility regarding culture and fine arts. Since a rich cultural life requires variety and commitment to innovative and bold forms of cultural activity, the model should measure the corporate commitment to fostering axiological pluralism in the cultural sphere. A subordinate purpose is testing that model using primary data on the biggest Spanish listed companies. First, we define the corporate cultural responsibility (CCR) as a specific field of the corporate social responsibility. Second, we defend that corporate citizenship involves accepting some risks to be in line with the public expectations on arts and culture. Third, it is proposed an assessment model that takes into account the kind of cultural activities promoted by the firms, from conventional and uncommitted to innovative and provoking. The model makes possible to rank the companies according to the quality of their CCR and take into account the influence of size and sector. The model reveals whether firms support conventional versus challenging cultural activities. This should be taken into consideration both by CSR managers and policy makers. In spite of the mounting economic significance of symbols and creativity, there is still little literature that specifically addresses the role of firms regarding arts and culture as another facet of their responsibility as corporate citizens.

Details

The Contribution of Love, and Hate, to Organizational Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-503-4

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Article

Ian Fillis

The focus of this paper is the interrogation of an artistic approach with the purpose of understanding entrepreneurial marketing.

Abstract

Purpose

The focus of this paper is the interrogation of an artistic approach with the purpose of understanding entrepreneurial marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper although the evaluation is grounded in prior quantitative and qualitative research in entrepreneurial marketing, creativity and art.

Findings

An artistic approach to understanding entrepreneurial marketing matches the way in which the owner/manager behaves in practice by constructing a personalised approach to doing marketing.

Research limitations/implications

The paper calls for more creative ways of understanding entrepreneurial marketing. This involves more experimentation in research methodology. The experimental approach also mirrors entrepreneurial marketing practice.

Practical implications

The outcomes address existing theory versus practice gaps so that a more meaningful understanding of entrepreneurial marketing practice can be obtained through the re‐imagining of the entrepreneurial marketer as an artist.

Originality/value

This is an under‐utilised approach to understanding entrepreneurial marketing. The approach matches the wider calls for artistic methods in the wider management academy.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Advances in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-684-8

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