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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Stephen R. Luxmore and Edward J. Stendardi

Total quality management (TQM) has received considerable attention as a way to increase both the effectiveness and the efficiency of corporations (Bounds et. al., 1994;…

Abstract

Total quality management (TQM) has received considerable attention as a way to increase both the effectiveness and the efficiency of corporations (Bounds et. al., 1994; Grant, Shani and Krisnan 1994; Olian and Rynes 1991; Powell 1995; Ross 1993). Concerned primarily with the delivery of customer satisfaction, the proponents of quality and/or TQM (Deming 1986; Juran 1992; and Crosby 1979) have developed principles and procedures for achieving total quality and meeting multiple corporate goals. Empirical evidence regarding outcomes is mixed; success and failure case studies abound, statistical methodologies are questioned, and more rigorous empirical studies present some positive findings (Powell 1995). Some maintain that the reasons for the failure of TQM systems is incompatibility between existing Western management thought which is grounded in economic models, and the TQM paradigm, which evolved from statistical theory, and has its own set of assumptions (Grant, Shani and Krisnan 1994). Despite such mixed empirical results, TQM continues to be promoted and implemented. This is the beginning point for our examination of TQM. The TQ management paradigm is practiced in economically and culturally diverse environments, including those which embrace an economic perspective, complete with maximisation of shareholder wealth, self‐interest, rational decision makers, separation of ownership, and agency costs (Grant, Shani and Krishnan 1994).

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Management Research News, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Edward J. Stendardi

Much has been written about the difficulty that baby boomers will face when they begin to retire. Concerns have been raised about the long‐term problems facing the Social…

Abstract

Much has been written about the difficulty that baby boomers will face when they begin to retire. Concerns have been raised about the long‐term problems facing the Social Security system, problems with employer provided pension plans, volatile financial markets and unfavorable demographics. The purpose of this paper is to examine one tool that baby boomers can use to make their retirements more successful — phased retirement. Moreover, this paper will attempt to demonstrate that it is in the best interest of not only employees but also employers and government at all levels to promote the growth of this concept.

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Humanomics, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Judy F. Graham, Edward J. Stendardi, Joan K. Myers and Mark J. Graham

Refers to past research regarding gender differences in investment strategies which has pointed to two important differences: female investors appear both to be more risk…

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6092

Abstract

Refers to past research regarding gender differences in investment strategies which has pointed to two important differences: female investors appear both to be more risk averse and to have less confidence in their investment decisions than male investors in equivalent circumstances. Given the relative consistency of these findings, as well as the potential long‐term financial implications of these differing investment strategies, surprisingly little research has focused on the underlying reasons for these gender differences. Proposes that gender differences in information processing styles may account for the lower risk‐taking tendencies among female investors as well as the tendency toward lower confidence levels. Implications regarding marketing strategies for the financial services sector are discussed.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Edward J. Stendardi, Judy F. Graham and Mary O’Reilly

To research the gender literature in order to determine whether it is advisable for a financial advisor to adjust their planning and advising processes based on the gender…

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2380

Abstract

Purpose

To research the gender literature in order to determine whether it is advisable for a financial advisor to adjust their planning and advising processes based on the gender of their client.

Design/methodology/approach

To correlate the gender literature with the personal financial planning process in order to determine whether advisors should adjust their approach based on the gender of their client.

Findings

The gender literature reveals significant differences concerning how men and women invest; consequently, it is felt that it is advisable for financial advisors to tailor their approach based on the gender of their client.

Research limitations/implications

The financial planning process should be modified to incorporate the gender of the client.

Practical implications

Financial advisors should tailor their approach to the gender of their clients in order to ideal with them more effectively.

Originality/value

As female investors grow in importance, processes should be modified or adjusted in order to accommodated their preferences.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Cecilia Hermansson

The purpose of this paper is to understand if and how saving motives can predict bank customers’ use of financial advisory services. In addition, it analyzes possible…

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1143

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand if and how saving motives can predict bank customers’ use of financial advisory services. In addition, it analyzes possible gender differences regarding this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a large and unique sample of Swedish bank customers, combining objective bank register data with subjective data from a questionnaire. A probit regression is used. Since decisions regarding the use of financial advisory services can be influenced by, e.g., age, wealth, gender and marital status, the author analyzes results at both the overall level and the group level.

Findings

All three saving motives are found to be predictors, i.e., motives to save for wealth, retirement, and a rainy day (with opposite sign). Only the motive to save for retirement is significant for both women and men. Wealth differences seem more important than gender differences, except for the rainy day motive where gender differences are observed also among the wealthy.

Practical implications

The study is important since there is a need for financial advisors to understand their customers’ context, including motives to save. Saving motives involving longer time horizons and more uncertainty are likely to predict the use of financial advisory services.

Originality/value

This paper is original because it deepens the understanding of the relationship between saving motives and customers’ use of financial advisory services, focusing also on the aspect of gender differences, while controlling for demographics and socioeconomics, and customers’ interest and confidence in financial matters, risk tolerance, and financial literacy.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 43 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Inga‐Lill Söderberg

This paper aims to investigate the relationships between advisor characteristics and consumer risk perception, willingness to follow advice and perception of advisor…

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2072

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationships between advisor characteristics and consumer risk perception, willingness to follow advice and perception of advisor credibility in a financial services context. It answers calls for more knowledge about financial advisors’ influence on financial decision‐making among consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental study, displaying financial advice together with photographs of advisors, was completed by convenience sampling of 200 Swedish consumers and analysis using statistical techniques to compare groups: two‐way between‐groups ANOVA.

Findings

This study shows that advisor gender affected consumer risk perceptions, willingness to follow advice and perception of advisor credibility in a financial services context, whereas advisor mood affected only consumer willingness to follow advice. No biases depending on buyer–seller similarity were found.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on consumer perceptions – not real‐life investment choices. Conclusions are drawn from a relatively small sample. However, the policy implications are important, suggesting that characteristics other than those of consumers (e.g. gender, educational level, occupation, financial literacy) can be of relevance for policymakers in their attempts to improve consumer protection.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful insights for marketing practitioners that could help adjust information disseminated to consumer segments and that could have implications for marketing and hiring practices in the financial sector.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the role of advisor characteristics in consumer financial decision‐making and calls for more research on financial advisory services.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Egidio Riva

The purpose of this paper is to outline and assess the role of industrial relations in introducing work-family-related policies and investigate the drivers, nature and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline and assess the role of industrial relations in introducing work-family-related policies and investigate the drivers, nature and scope of contract provisions that were bargained in the following domains: flexible working arrangements, leave schemes, care services and other supportive arrangements. Analyses draw on information filed in a unique and restricted access repository, the SEcond-level Collective Bargaining Observatory (OCSEL) held by Confederazione Italiana Sindacati Lavoratori (CISL), one of the major trade union organizations in Italy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents and examines, by means of descriptive statistics and content analysis, available information on 285 company-level agreements around work-family-related issues that were signed in Italy between January 2012 and December 2015, in the aftermath of the great recession.

Findings

Work-family issues do not seem to be a major bargaining concern. The availability of specific arrangements is mostly limited to the domain of working time flexibility and it is not quite innovative in its contents. Besides, there is little evidence that the mutual gains rationale is embedded in collective bargaining in the field. However, mature and well-established labour relations result in more innovative and strategic company-level bargaining that is also conducive to work-family-related arrangements.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is not representative. Thus, the results obtained in this study cannot be extended to make predictions and conclusions about the population of collective agreements negotiated and signed in Italian companies in the period under scrutiny.

Originality/value

Research on the industrial relations context that lies behind the design and implementation of work-family workplace arrangements is still limited. Furthermore, the evidence is inconclusive. This manuscript intends to address this research gap and provide a much more nuanced understanding.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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