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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Carol A. Hurney, Carole Nash, Christie-Joy B. Hartman and Edward J. Brantmeier

Key elements of a curriculum are presented for a faculty development program that integrated sustainability content with effective course design methodology across a…

Abstract

Purpose

Key elements of a curriculum are presented for a faculty development program that integrated sustainability content with effective course design methodology across a variety of disciplines. The study aims to present self-reported impacts for a small number of faculty participants and their courses.

Design/methodology/approach

A yearlong faculty development program to introduce content and effective course design for teaching about sustainability was created through a content-driven, backward design approach. Faculty participants from two cohorts were surveyed electronically to evaluate their perceptions of the impact of the program on their courses and professional development either one or two years after completing the program.

Findings

The theoretical model, curriculum and assignments for the sustainability-enhanced program are presented and discussed. Faculty participant responses to a survey (n = 14) following completion of the program indicated that the process changed pedagogical approaches, created a sense of community and raised awareness of campus resources. Faculty perceived that sustainability content enhanced their course redesign by providing “real-world” relevance, awareness and engagement. More than half of the respondents reported using tools they learned in the program to redesign elements of other courses. Three respondents indicated that integrating sustainability content into their courses had little to no benefit.

Research limitations/implications

The study did not explore the impact of the program on faculty and student learning.

Practical implications

The tools presented are practice-ready.

Originality/value

This study can inform the design and evaluation of other sustainability-related faculty development programs.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Jayson W. Richardson and Edward J. Brantmeier

The world is now in an era of condensed space and time in which cultural dynamics, including cultural conflict, are increasingly mediated by powerful technologies that…

Abstract

Purpose

The world is now in an era of condensed space and time in which cultural dynamics, including cultural conflict, are increasingly mediated by powerful technologies that hold the potential to accelerate change and create new opportunities. Conversely, these same powerful technologies, and the denial thereof, are used to sustain oppressive conditions and wage war for ideological (e.g. religion and politics) and material purposes (e.g. water, oil, and food). From the power of networking, in addition to the tyranny of isolation, information and communication technologies (ICTs) hold the potential for transformative change, as well as to maintain status quo through oppression and domination. The purpose of this paper is to create a model that attempts to delineate the role of ICTs in catalyzing a peaceful and democratic conflict transformation, while using a snapshot of the Egyptian Revolution of 2011; also to hypothesize that the adoption of modern digital technologies has created a mechanism for protests to achieve their ends through relatively peaceful mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

This analysis explores the use of ICTs in the protest process, using a snapshot of the Egyptian protests of 2011. The authors test a model of ICTs for peace and conflict transformation.

Findings

It is found that, in essence, it effectively describes nuances of the modern protest process. However, the researchers propose a modified explanatory model of how ICTs are used, and can be used, for political mobilization on the road toward sustainable peace.

Research limitations/implications

Every protest and every regime change is unique. The model used in this case needs to be tested further in other instances.

Social implications

This model could be used to analyze other protests and uprising to understand an array of stakeholders' needs.

Originality/value

Analyzing those events that are fundamentally being changed through the use of modern technology is a valuable contribution to the field.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Edward J. Brantmeier, Antonette Aragon and James Folkestad

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a very difficult, yet all important and ongoing research question – how do we best use online collaborative learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a very difficult, yet all important and ongoing research question – how do we best use online collaborative learning modalities (CLM) to supplement conversations in multicultural education courses?

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study examined emergent themes in asynchronous threaded discussions created by 23 students within a Master's level multicultural education course at a large land‐grant university in the USA.

Findings

Engagement in threaded discussions fostered student understanding of a systems perspective of social realities. Power, privilege, and oppression related to race, gender, and economics in the USA were explored through student use of real world, concrete examples – something that does not always occur in face‐to‐face classroom encounters constrained by time and the pacing of curriculum.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers would like to see more empirical research in using technologically mediated, CLM to foster conversations surrounding power, oppression, and privilege in efforts to advance the pedagogies of critical multicultural education.

Practical implications

Using threaded discussions seems to be a promising practice in teaching critical multicultural education content.

Social implications

This research project provides understanding of how CLM can help establish systems perspectives – perspectives critical to multicultural education.

Originality/value

This paper advances the conversation related to promising practices in multicultural education. Scarce empirical research exists related to critical approaches to multicultural education online.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Edward J. Brantmeier

The situated appropriation of the content of globalization by Navajo people and institutions in their unique U.S. Southwest context is the focus of this chapter. The local…

Abstract

The situated appropriation of the content of globalization by Navajo people and institutions in their unique U.S. Southwest context is the focus of this chapter. The local is transforming the content of the global for local ends; this conversation narrative posits situated cultural exchange rather than a conversion narrative that implies a uni-directional mode of cultural assimilation. Reflections on cultural change in both formal and non-formal educational contexts based on the author's years of experience in the Navajo Nation provide data to freshly examine a conceptual framework for explaining cultural change amid contemporary globalization. The concepts of situated appropriation, adaptive intelligence, and mutual appropriation are employed in the analysis of cultural conflict and change in this chapter.

Details

Power, Voice and the Public Good: Schooling and Education in Global Societies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-185-5

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Abstract

Details

Power, Voice and the Public Good: Schooling and Education in Global Societies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-185-5

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Abstract

Details

Exploring Self Toward Expanding Teaching, Teacher Education and Practitioner Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-262-9

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