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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Edward Hanna and Richard J. Hall

Global temperature has risen by 1°C since 1900, while since the 1990s the Arctic has recently experienced an accelerated warming of about double the average rate of global…

Abstract

Global temperature has risen by 1°C since 1900, while since the 1990s the Arctic has recently experienced an accelerated warming of about double the average rate of global warming. Nearly all climate scientists agree that the main cause of this temperature rise is ever-increasing accumulations of ‘greenhouse gases’, especially carbon dioxide and methane, within our atmosphere. Sea level rise could easily exceed one metre this century under ‘business as usual’. However, global warming is not just about rising temperatures, melting ice and rising sea levels, but it also affects the frequency and severity of many extreme weather events. Planetary warming is not a uniform process, can spring surprises in regional climate change and is probably linked with the tendency for Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes to have more extreme (variously hot/cold/dry/wet) weather, especially during the recent period of rapid Arctic warming. There is overwhelming scientific evidence that human activity through enhanced greenhouse gas emissions is largely responsible for recent climate change and accompanying extreme weather, and we are already clearly seeing these changes. However, it is equally evident that, although initial remedial steps are being taken, finding an adequate solution will not be easy unless much larger changes are made to the way in which we all live. Limiting global warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial temperatures would require global carbon dioxide emissions to decrease by approximately 40–60% by 2030 relative to 2010 levels. This can only be achieved through a collective solution that fully involves diverse communities, among them religious stakeholders.

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Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Abstract

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Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Abstract

Details

Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Abstract

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Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Mark G. Macklin and John Lewin

Rivers have played a defining role in the global development of human societies and culture. This will undoubtedly continue in the twenty-first century with a growing demand for…

Abstract

Rivers have played a defining role in the global development of human societies and culture. This will undoubtedly continue in the twenty-first century with a growing demand for water, increasing pollution of river channel and floodplain environments, and anthropogenic global warming-related changes in the frequency of floods and droughts. These will have major environmental and societal impacts worldwide. We consider how rivers initially shaped societies, and then how urbanisation, industrialisation and intensified agriculture have more recently transformed river systems, so compromising planetary health and human ways of life. So where do we go from here? Humanity now faces an existential environmental catastrophe of its own making, and it will be on the world's most densely populated floodplains where this crisis will be played out. We highlight likely areas facing the greatest challenges. Ironically, many of these are where ancient civilisations began. Interdisciplinary catchment-based approaches, and new technologies such as those based on satellite imagery and unmanned aerial vehicles, are now beginning to address pressing societal and planetary problems in the unfolding climate crisis.

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Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Fetalai Gagaeolo, Sarah Hemstock and Connor Price

This chapter examines the perceived socio-cultural impacts of relocation to Fiji through the lens of target communities in Kiribati. Findings based on the perceptions of Kiribati…

Abstract

This chapter examines the perceived socio-cultural impacts of relocation to Fiji through the lens of target communities in Kiribati. Findings based on the perceptions of Kiribati communities reveal that relocation is the last ‘adaptation resort’ to escape and offset individual losses caused by climate change. It is viewed as an option that will compromise their socio-cultural practices and values in the long term. This study indicates that attention should not be focused only on factors that drive human relocation but should also prioritise justifications of those who choose not to relocate. This approach will better serve community expectations for in-country climate change adaptation and help shape future strategies and/or policies on climate change-driven relocation. Finally, policies and adaptation initiatives should be holistically framed; integrating values that are important to grassroots level such as socio-cultural values; and spiritual and mobility concerns for informed decision-making at all levels.

Details

Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Peni Hausia Havea

As a scholar from Tonga, I developed this reflection based on my own experiences as a training Pastor for the Free Wesleyan Church (FWC), working in Pacific Island region on the…

Abstract

As a scholar from Tonga, I developed this reflection based on my own experiences as a training Pastor for the Free Wesleyan Church (FWC), working in Pacific Island region on the area of climate change and religion. Here, I am taking a quote from the Bible (e.g. Luke 18:27) and used it as a theme to tell the story of Pacific people about Moana and how this state-of-the-art idea helps in shaping resilience (Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction). In the context of the Pacific (e.g. Tonga), the meaning of Moana is complex. Using this leading-edge idea as a guide, I model a framework named ‘Moana: Nothing is impossible with God’. By implementing this model to affected communities, Resilience Moana and Sustainable Development Goals are expected to be achieved by 2030 and beyond.

Details

Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Theresa G. Mercer and Andrew P. Kythreotis

This chapter discusses how society can be more involved in climate research and policy as a more socially equitable and just way of tackling future climate impacts through the…

Abstract

This chapter discusses how society can be more involved in climate research and policy as a more socially equitable and just way of tackling future climate impacts through the lens of education. The first section discusses previous and contemporary social and political conditions in relation to increased and more equitable and just citizen engagement in climate action in the science–policy domain. The second section then explores how collaborative education approaches through Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) can be ramped up to catalyse increased citizen engagement in climate action. The chapter concludes by critically discussing future directions for research in ESD and climate change as a more inclusive and just form of climate governance.

Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Sheila Moore Andrus

The climate crisis is frightening for many people because of evident and often dire impacts. Although these impacts are alarming, it's often not clear what one person, or one…

Abstract

The climate crisis is frightening for many people because of evident and often dire impacts. Although these impacts are alarming, it's often not clear what one person, or one community, can do to drive down greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. For this reason, the Episcopal Diocese of California initiated the development and rollout of an Internet accessible tool – sustainislandhome.org – that can help people and communities be part of climate solutions. This chapter focuses on why sustainislandhome.org was developed, its design principles and how it works, and lessons the Episcopal Church is learning from rollout of this tool across Episcopal dioceses in the United States. It's my hope that our effort can serve as a model for other faith communities in educating and mobilizing their members for climate action and advocacy.

Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Sally Myers

This chapter offers an analysis of the different voices and perspectives comprising the book. It explores the main themes that have emerged from the chapters and conversations…

Abstract

This chapter offers an analysis of the different voices and perspectives comprising the book. It explores the main themes that have emerged from the chapters and conversations, offering an overview of areas of difference, but also of surprising fundamental agreement, not just on the ‘what’ but also the ‘how’ of what needs to happen next.

Details

Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

Keywords

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