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Article
Publication date: 13 December 2023

Kofi Agyekum, Annabel Morkporkpor Ami Dompey, Hayford Pittri and Edward Ayebeng Botchway

Design for maintainability (DfM) is a construction technique that links maintenance objectives with the design process. Adopting DfM within the construction industry is a solution…

Abstract

Purpose

Design for maintainability (DfM) is a construction technique that links maintenance objectives with the design process. Adopting DfM within the construction industry is a solution that can make the maintenance of buildings cost-efficient and simpler. This study investigates the level of implementation of DfM among design professionals in the Ghanaian construction industry (GCI).

Design/methodology/approach

The data from design professionals comprising architects and civil/structural engineers were collected via a questionnaire survey. The data obtained were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical tests.

Findings

The findings revealed a high level of engagement of design professionals in DfM practices in the Ghanaian construction sector. This high level of engagement is credited to the high level of awareness of the concept of DfM among design professionals, the level of education of design professionals, experience in professional roles and familiarity with the principles of DfM.

Originality/value

This study offers information and fresh perspectives on how cutting-edge DfM principles are practiced in the GCI. The study raises awareness and the level of DfM implementation among design professionals in the GCI. It offers information on how the application of DfM principles enhances cost-effective maintenance that allows facilities to stand the test of time and prove more relevant for users. The understanding and application of DfM in different countries are important if such concepts are to take deep root in the global built environment sector.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2024

Hayford Pittri, Godawatte Arachchige Gimhan Rathnagee Godawatte, Kofi Agyekum, Edward Ayebeng Botchway, Annabel Morkporkpor Ami Dompey, Samuel Oduro and Eric Asamoah

Despite endeavors to alleviate construction and demolition waste and the indications that the process of deconstruction has the potential to steer waste reduction initiatives…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite endeavors to alleviate construction and demolition waste and the indications that the process of deconstruction has the potential to steer waste reduction initiatives, there has not been a progressive increase in the adoption of Design for Deconstruction (DfD) in the global south, especially Ghana. This paper aims to identify and analyze the barriers to implementing DfD in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire survey was used to solicit the views of 240 design professionals in the Ghanaian construction industry (GCI). The questionnaire was developed by reviewing pertinent literature and complemented with a pilot review. Data were analyzed using descriptive and nonparametric statistics.

Findings

The findings revealed ten (10) significant impediments to implementing DfD within the construction industries in developing economies. These impediments revolve around cost, legal matters, storage, incentive and design-related matters. Key among these barriers is “For recovered materials, there are little performance guarantees,” “The absence of strict regulations regarding design for deconstruction,” “Lack of a large market enough for components that have been recovered,” “The need for building codes that address how to design with reused materials” and “Lack of effective design for deconstruction tools.”

Originality/value

The results of this research shed light on a relatively unexplored area within the construction sector, particularly in a developing country like Ghana. Furthermore, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, the study contributes fresh and supplementary knowledge and perspectives regarding the challenges in implementing DfD practices.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 October 2023

Kofi Agyekum, Judith Amudjie, Hayford Pittri, Annabel Morkporkpor Ami Dompey and Edward Ayebeng Botchway

Circular economy (CE) is guided by principles, the key being the R-framework. All R-frameworks have a hierarchy. Although several studies have prioritized these principles, there…

Abstract

Purpose

Circular economy (CE) is guided by principles, the key being the R-framework. All R-frameworks have a hierarchy. Although several studies have prioritized these principles, there is still an urgent call for country-specific prioritization. This study prioritized circular economy (CE) principles among Ghana's built environment (BE) professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

An explanatory sequential mixed methods approach was adopted. Six principles of CE were identified through a review of related literature and incorporated into a questionnaire. In total, 162 questionnaire responses were received. The quantitative data were analyzed through descriptive and inferential analyses. The data were further validated via semi-structured interviews with eight interviewees of different professional backgrounds in the BE.

Findings

The findings revealed that BE professionals in Ghana highly perceived CE principles as important. The findings further revealed the order of prioritization of the CE principles as follows: (1) recycle, (2) reuse, (3) repair/remanufacture, (4) renewable energy usage, (5) redesign and (6) reduce. To further elaborate on these prioritized principles via the qualitative phase, the interviewees agreed to and confirmed the importance of the identified principles through their verbatim comments.

Originality/value

Although there is a growing interest in research regarding CE in the Ghanaian construction industry, its principles have yet to be prioritized and ranked by professionals in the Ghanaian construction industry. This study unearths why, in terms of prioritization of the CE principles, the construction industry in Ghana does not follow the well-known hierarchy (i.e. reduce, reuse and recycle) in the order of high to low level of circularity.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2023

Hayford Pittri, Kofi Agyekum, Edward Ayebeng Botchway, João Alencastro, Olugbenga Timo Oladinrin and Annabel Morkporkpor Ami Dompey

The design for deconstruction (DfD) technique, a contemporaneous solution to demolition by optimizing disassembly activities to enable reuse, has recently emerged with several…

Abstract

Purpose

The design for deconstruction (DfD) technique, a contemporaneous solution to demolition by optimizing disassembly activities to enable reuse, has recently emerged with several promises to promote the circular economy. However, little attention has been given to its implementation among design professionals, especially in the Global South. Therefore, this study aims to explore the drivers for DfD implementation among design professionals in the Ghanaian construction industry (GCI).

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a mixed research approach (explanatory sequential design) with an initial quantitative instrument phase, followed by a qualitative data collection phase. Data from the survey were analyzed using mean, standard deviation, one-sample t-Test, and normalization value (NV) test after a review of pertinent literature. These data were then validated through semistructured interviews with ten design professionals with in-depth knowledge of DfD.

Findings

The findings revealed that although all ten drivers are important, the eight key drivers for the DfD implementation were identified as, in order of importance, “Availability of computer software applications regarding DfD,” “Inclusion of DfD in the formal education of design professionals,” “Increasing public awareness of the concept of DfD,” “Organizing workshops/seminars for design professionals on the concept of DfD,” “Availability of DfD training,” “Regulation regarding DfD,” “Industry guidance regarding DfD” and “Establishing a market for salvaged construction components.”

Originality/value

This study's findings provide insights into an under-investigated topic in Ghana and offer new and additional information and insights into the current state-of-the-art on the factors that drive DfD implementation.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2023

Edward Ayebeng Botchway, Kofi Agyekum, Jenefailus Nikoi Kotei-Martin and Samuel Owusu Afram

This study explores the utilization of simulation tools for building performance assessments among design professionals in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the utilization of simulation tools for building performance assessments among design professionals in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach was used to obtain responses from 104 design professionals in Ghana through a structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was generated through a critical review of the related literature on the subject matter. Data from respondents were analyzed through descriptive and inferential statistics.

Findings

Results from the analysis indicated that design professionals in Ghana possessed a low level of awareness of the simulation tools used for building performance assessments. Subsequently, the findings also revealed that the design professionals' level of usage of the simulation tools was low.

Practical implications

Practically, the establishment of this study informs design stakeholders, educational institutions and researchers in Ghana. For design professionals, these findings will focus on enhancing their use of simulation tools for evaluating building performance in Ghana. For educational institutions, these findings will enable them to implement the necessary strategies for incorporating the concept of building performance simulation into their curriculum in order to boost awareness and utilization. Finally, researchers will also use the study's findings to identify any research gaps for future studies.

Originality/value

The findings from this study pioneer knowledge on an under-investigated topic within the Ghanaian construction industry. It also provides insight into the developing state-of-the-art technology employed in the built environment.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 October 2023

Edward Ayebeng Botchway, Kofi Agyekum, Judith Amudjie and Hayford Pittri

This study aims to explore occupants’ perceived importance and satisfaction with high-rise students’ housing facilities’ fire safety considerations (FSCs). The specific objectives…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore occupants’ perceived importance and satisfaction with high-rise students’ housing facilities’ fire safety considerations (FSCs). The specific objectives are to explore the FSCs for high-rise students’ housing facilities and assess the level of importance and satisfaction with the FSCs provided in high-rise students’ housing facilities in controlling fire outbreaks.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an exploratory sequential design with an initial qualitative phase followed by a quantitative data collection phase. Twenty FSCs were identified through the qualitative phase via semistructured interviews. Their importance and satisfaction were revealed through survey questionnaires with 168 respondents who stayed in or were involved in the operation of high-rise students’ housing facilities. Data from the qualitative phase were analyzed thematically, and those obtained from the quantitative phase were analyzed descriptively and inferentially.

Findings

The study’s findings revealed that all the 20 FSCs identified via the qualitative phase and confirmed through the quantitative phase were perceived to be very important in fighting fires in high-rise students’ housing facilities. However, only 9 out of the 20 FSCs received some satisfaction among the respondents in fighting fires in the facilities.

Originality/value

This study offers insight into a rare study area, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In addition, it grants insight into the occupants’ perspective regarding which FSCs they consider essential and their level of satisfaction with such FSCs in fighting fires in high-rise students’ housing facilities.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2023

Judith Amudjie, Kofi Agyekum, Emmanuel Adinyira, Samuel Amos-Abanyie and Edward Ayebeng Botchway

This study aims to examine the strategies that can be adopted to enhance the practice of circular economy (CE) principles among built environment (BE) firms operating in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the strategies that can be adopted to enhance the practice of circular economy (CE) principles among built environment (BE) firms operating in the Ghanaian Construction Industry (GCI).

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire survey was used to solicit the views of 162 BE professionals working in construction, consulting, and developer firms on the issue under investigation. The questionnaire was developed through a review of related literature and complemented with a pilot review. Data were analysed by descriptive and inferential statistics.

Findings

The findings revealed four major categories of strategies (i.e. systems and technical related strategies, market orientation and operational strategies, knowledge dissemination and awareness-related strategies, and environmental and regulatory strategies) to promote the practice of the principles of CE among BE professionals in the GCI.

Originality/value

This study’s findings provide insights into an under-investigated topic in the construction industry, especially, in a developing country such as Ghana, and offer new and additional information and insights into the current state-of-the-art on CE implementation.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2023

Edward Ayebeng Botchway, Kofi Agyekum, Hayford Pittri and Anthony Lamina

This study explores the importance of and vulnerabilities in deploying physical access control (PAC) devices in a typical university setting.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the importance of and vulnerabilities in deploying physical access control (PAC) devices in a typical university setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts face-to-face and telephone interviews. This study uses a semi-structured interview guide to solicit the views of 25 interviewees on the subject under consideration. Qualitative responses to the interview are thematically analyzed using NVivo 11 Pro analysis application software.

Findings

The findings reveal five importance and seven vulnerabilities in the deployment of PAC devices in the institution. Key among the importance of deploying the devices are “prevent unwanted premise access or intrusions,” “prevent disruptions to university/staff operations on campus” and “protect students and staff from outside intruders.” Key among the identified vulnerabilities are “tailgating”, “delay in emergent cases” and “power outage may affect its usage.”

Originality/value

This study offers insight into a rare area of study, especially in the Sub-Saharan Africa region. Furthermore, the study contributes to the state-of-the-art importance and vulnerabilities in deploying PAC devices in daily human activities. The study is valuable in that it has the potential to establish a foundation for future studies that may delve into investigating issues associated with the deployment of PAC devices.

Details

Frontiers in Engineering and Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-2499

Keywords

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