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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Joseph Murphy and Philip Hallinger

Eleven representative examples of professional development areexamined in what is labelled a new era of administrator training. Ananalysis is presented of the conditions…

Abstract

Eleven representative examples of professional development are examined in what is labelled a new era of administrator training. An analysis is presented of the conditions that have helped foster interest in the creation of new approaches to the training of school administrators. Ten current conditions in the area of administrator training where improvement is needed are reported on. Commonalities among the new approaches to training are discussed and these principles juxtaposed against the status quo in administrator training. It is concluded that the new era of professional development is significantly different from many current training programmes, in terms of both process and content. These differences are examined in detail. Potential problems in these newer approaches to administrator training are noted.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Barry John Bannister

Proposes that the improvement of educational management practicesat the operational level requires the adoption of an approach based onneeds analysis, evaluation, and…

Abstract

Proposes that the improvement of educational management practices at the operational level requires the adoption of an approach based on needs analysis, evaluation, and training. Assumes that educational managers are accountable to the public for their actions and performance and that they seek improvements in the quality of the educational services they provide and stresses the importance of understanding and attempting to measure the results of such services. This in turn requires an analysis of educational programme dynamics and the limitations upon managers in working to achieve increases in service quality. In constructing a training scheme aimed at management improvement, this aspect is referred to as a “needs analysis based on programme dynamics”. Identifies factors involved in the design of a training scheme for educational administrators, namely: needs analysis based on programme dynamics: key competences for administrators: training design: a HRD agenda: and an implementation plan. Discusses only the first of these, given the current constraints of time and space, with the other factors being the subject of a subsequent article.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Waheed Hammad and Aisha Salim Ali Al-Harthi

In a global context characterised by a growing recognition of the role that educational leaders play in ensuring school effectiveness and the consequent need to design…

Abstract

In a global context characterised by a growing recognition of the role that educational leaders play in ensuring school effectiveness and the consequent need to design effective leadership preparation programmes, many educational leadership preparation providers around the world have borrowed international standards and frameworks in order to guide their programmes and assure their quality. This trend has been on the rise as a response to globalisation pressures and a growing interest in acquiring international recognition through accreditation agencies. However, this raises important questions about the potential repercussion of using foreign, mainly Western, frameworks to develop or assess national leadership preparation provision. Evidence from relevant literature indicates that these frameworks, when applied to local contexts, need to take contextual factors into account. In this chapter, we engage with existing literature in relation to leadership preparation, internationalisation and professional standards to reflect on our experience of using international standards to develop the Masters in Educational Administration programme offered by Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) in Oman. We hope to contribute to existing internationalisation literature by providing a different perspective on educational administration and leadership preparation from a non-Western tradition, thereby expanding the understanding of meaningful leadership preparation in general.

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Internationalisation of Educational Administration and Leadership Curriculum
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-865-9

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Christian Imdorf, Kristinn Hegna, Verena Eberhard and Pierre Doray

How do institutional settings and their embedded policy principles affect gender-typed enrolment in educational programmes? Based on gender-sensitive theories on career…

Abstract

How do institutional settings and their embedded policy principles affect gender-typed enrolment in educational programmes? Based on gender-sensitive theories on career choice, we hypothesised that gender segregation in education is higher with a wider range of offers of vocational programmes. By analysing youth survey and panel data, we tested this assumption for Germany, Norway and Canada, three countries whose educational systems represent a different mix of academic, vocational and universalistic education principles. We found that vocational programmes are considerably more gender-segregated than are academic (e.g. university) programmes. Men, more so than women, can avoid gender-typed programmes by passing on to a university education. This in turn means that as long as their secondary school achievement does not allow for a higher education career, they have a higher likelihood of being allocated to male-typed programmes in the vocational education and training (VET) system. In addition, social background and the age at which students have to choose educational offers impact on the transition to gendered educational programmes. Overall, gender segregation in education is highest in Germany and the lowest in Canada. We interpret the differences between these countries with respect to the constellations of educational principles and policies in the respective countries.

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Gender Segregation in Vocational Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-347-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1975

A. ROSS THOMAS

The award of a Commonwealth Visiting Fellowship enabled the writer to investigate preparation programmes for educational administrators in twelve prominent Canadian…

Abstract

The award of a Commonwealth Visiting Fellowship enabled the writer to investigate preparation programmes for educational administrators in twelve prominent Canadian universities. Interviews with professors, students and practising administrators, participation in lectures, seminars and assessment procedures provided the basis for the writer's impressions. An analysis of pre‐Master's, Master's and doctoral programmes revealed that, in general, students must select courses from (i) organization and administration theory, (ii) educational personnel supervision, (iii) education in Canada and (iv) a series of options. Evidence of a combination of discipline, theory, problems and career‐based approaches was found in most programmes. The writer argues that Canadian professors of educational administration are (i) anxious to improve the quality of the courses offered and grappling with the problem of programme relevance, (ii) not generally concerned with teaching as a skill and restricted in methods used, particularly simulations, (iii) somewhat insular in outlook and (prior to the establishment of CASEA) lacking an adequate means of inter‐departmental communication. Future developments in the preparation of educational administrators are foreshadowed by the writer.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Emmanuel Bugingo and John R. Verduin

The pertinent literature is reviewed and a paradigm or a frameworkis presented to guide conceptualisation and implementation for theprogramme development process in…

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5449

Abstract

The pertinent literature is reviewed and a paradigm or a framework is presented to guide conceptualisation and implementation for the programme development process in educational administration in an African country, Rwanda. The framework components include four dimensions and related systematic conceptual levels and procedural stages. It is argued that improvement of education requires the definition of the goals of educational administration, the upgrading of the instruction for on‐the‐job practitioners, and the development of a pre‐service programme for prospective school administrators responsible for efficient and effective management of the centralised educational system. The framework claims to be a disciplinary matrix for developing a pre‐service programme in the field of educational administration.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Günter Hefler and Jörg Markowitsch

The purpose of this paper is to show how a typology of participating patterns is developed to deepen understanding of participation in formal adult education and the…

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1375

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how a typology of participating patterns is developed to deepen understanding of participation in formal adult education and the relationship between current workplace and educational programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of conceptual work based on a qualitative analysis of 89 cases studies covering 113 participating employees in small and medium‐sized enterprises in 12 European countries.

Findings

Five main types of participation patterns in formal adult education are identified. When employed participants focus on their education, they may complete their formal programme (“Completing”), overrule an earlier decision to leave the educational system (“Returning”) or look for a starting‐point to change their professional career (“Transforming”). When focusing on employment, employees may use formal adult education for “Reinforcing” their earlier career decisions. Here, four subtypes are proposed. Finally, employees may enjoy their studies for features not available at work (“Compensation”).

Research limitations/implications

The typology was based on qualitative data; the sample does not claim to be representative. However, it could become the basis for a quantitative survey design.

Practical implications

The typology is likely to be of value in a wide array of fields such as whether the employer organisation should offer support, or whether there should be an economic return to education.

Originality/value

The typology builds on a life‐cycle model and combines it with the relationship between the educational programme and the workplace. It is not restricted to certain groups of learners or formal programmes.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Cecil Miskel

The intention is to review the literature dealing with the role andstatus of research in preparation programmes for educationaladministrators, and to generate alternative…

Abstract

The intention is to review the literature dealing with the role and status of research in preparation programmes for educational administrators, and to generate alternative ways to incorporate research into the programmes. To guide the reviews and to generate alternatives, a framework consisting of three categories is used – a historical perspective, the knowledge base and faculty orientations. A primary conclusion is that educational administration must not only improve the quality and increase the quantity of research, but programmes must also be changed to include research in central and coherent ways.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

David L. Giles and Richard J.M. Smith

This article aims to discuss the conceptualisation process of developing a new one‐year taught‐master's programme in educational leadership at an Aotearoa/New Zealand university.

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633

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to discuss the conceptualisation process of developing a new one‐year taught‐master's programme in educational leadership at an Aotearoa/New Zealand university.

Design/methodology/approach

The perspective taken is a highly personalised one from the two lead “drivers” of the programme and outlines the two‐year process of development of the programme from conception through to the first papers delivered in semester one 2008. The article describes the process, the concerns, the underlying philosophy, content and intended delivery pattern within the Master of Educational Leadership (MEdL) programme. As the programme designers, the authors wanted something discernibly different in orientation from the postgraduate programmes offered by other tertiary providers in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The content had to be both educationally and culturally relevant and reflect the nation's bi‐cultural heritage, yet growing multi‐ethnic population base.

Findings

The proposed programme was somewhat controversial and had a rather difficult journey through the New Zealand Vice Chancellors' Committee (NZVCC) that deals with the accreditation process. The philosophy of the programme centred on leadership rather than a management focus. Moreover, the philosophy was premised on both theory and practice as praxis and drew on both developmental and experiential models for leadership development.

Originality/value

This article leads a critical discourse amongst tertiary educators in educational leadership programmes towards a greater exploration and articulation of the critical, humanistic, and phenomenological nature of the programmes it offers.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Montserrat Cabré i Pairet, Marta García-Lastra and Tomás A. Mantecón Movellán

Starting from the premise that lifelong learning is a significant asset when it comes to enjoying an active ageing process and an important resource for exploring new…

Abstract

Starting from the premise that lifelong learning is a significant asset when it comes to enjoying an active ageing process and an important resource for exploring new interests and capacities that were not developed in previous life stages, this contribution explores our findings regarding the participation of older women in higher education in Cantabria, a Northern Atlantic Spanish region. Through analyzing secondary data provided by the main higher education institutions and associations involved with the organization of lifelong learning programmes, it identifies gendered patterns of participation in both the formal and informal educational options. Women's greater involvement in these programmes is analyzed in terms of overcoming a patriarchal traditional culture that in past times had not considered women as active participants in educational spaces. This was particularly clear in the context of the years following the end of the Spanish Civil War and during Franco's dictatorship. Through education, for women, ageing becomes a new life opportunity for self-construction and empowerment as well as for their own decision making in relation to their own life chances. Educational changes implemented in Spain in the last decades have opened up many alternatives to formal education at adult educational centres and university levels. These include informal and semi-formal programmes and educational options opened to people independently of their previous educational backgrounds that provide many opportunities for filling educational gaps to generations of women who could not have consistent access to formal, high-quality training in their youth.

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